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Jeong-Oh Kim teaches Intro to Poetry sitting with students on Library Lawn

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Course Lists | Course Requirements for Majors and Minors | AXLE in the English Department

The courses below are offered by the English department. Courses in other departments may also count toward the major or minor in our program. For a full list of eligible courses, please see the Vanderbilt undergraduate catalog or YES (enrolled students only). 

Summer 2021 Courses

ENGL 1210W.01 Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques

Gabriel Briggs - Online Synchronous

MTWRF 1:10 - 4:00 PM

This course will provide a close study of short stories and novels and written explication of these forms. In particular, it examines Ernest Hemingway, one of the most influential writers in twentieth-century American Literature. To better understand Hemingway’s enduring cultural presence, students will read a number of short stories, novels, and non-fiction prose he produced between 1924 and 1951. Students will also develop strategies for positioning the author and his work within specific historical and theoretical contexts. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1210W.02 Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Redrawing Fictional Boundaries

Jeong-Oh Kim - Online Synchronous

MTWRF 10:10 - 1:00 PM

“Redrawing Fictional Boundaries”  will help students develop their writing skills while exploring and examining the forms and techniques of prose fiction. The texts in this course reinvent communities while providing  a critique of their communal, communicative truth claims, reimagining uncanny gothic (Dracula), urban heterotopia (Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), postmodern entropy (The Crying of Lot 49) and the rights of (wo)man (Frankenstein) as well as adolescents (A High Wind in Jamaica). We will think specifically through spatial relations and their internal networks, a new approach to re-drawing boundaries of prose fiction by examining its film and cultural adaptations. Class will be a mixture of synchronous discussion and asynchronous writing. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1260W.01 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis

Judy Klass - Online Synchronous

MTWRF 1:10 - 4:00 PM

This course focuses on adaptation: how stories are told and re-told across genres, eras and cultures; what changes and what doesn't. We'll look at what different iterations of a text say about the societies that created them. We'll watch The Seven Samurai and The Magnificent Seven, look at Jane Austen's Emma and watch Clueless, look a Gone with the Wind and read The Wind Done Gone, and compare Romeo and Juliet (and various films of it) to West Side Story. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3333 Love Books

Jessie Hock - Online Asynchronous

What does it mean to write about love, beauty, and pleasure in the expectation that someone else will read what you’ve written? From a spiritual, sublime, or cosmological force to an embodied, even pornographic or ridiculous experience, “love” in the texts we will read in this class is a highly diverse phenomenon. In all its forms, the idea of love allows poets and philosophers to explore what it means to write – or read – about subjectivity and emotion. Readings will include texts by Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, Petrarch, Stampa, Shakespeare, Marvell, Behn and more, and will span a wide range of genres, including epic, lyric, dramatic, narrative, epistolary, and philosophical prose. Students will become acquainted with ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literary and cultural history. Course requirements will likely include short reading responses, group work, a midterm, and a final.  [3] (HCA)

ENGL 1210W.02 Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques

Gabriel Briggs - Online Synchronous

MTWRF 10:10 - 12:00 PM

This course will provide a close study of short stories and novels and written explication of these forms. In particular, it examines Ernest Hemingway, one of the most influential writers in twentieth-century American Literature. To better understand Hemingway’s enduring cultural presence, students will read a number of short stories, novels, and non-fiction prose he produced between 1924 and 1951. Students will also develop strategies for positioning the author and his work within specific historical and theoretical contexts. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1100.01 Composition

Elisabeth Covington - Online Synchronous

MTWRF 9:10 - 11:00 PM

The primary objectives of this course are to demystify the college-level essay and to develop your writing skills so that you will be able to write quality essays during and after your time at Vanderbilt.  In addition to thinking about questions of style, we will conduct in-depth investigations of the three fundamental elements of an excellent essay: analysis, argumentation, and explication. I will ask you to think critically and to craft subtle, persuasive, well-reasoned essays.  The analytical and argumentative skills developed in this class will help you to articulate your ideas clearly and convincingly. [3] (No AXLE credit)

 

ENGL 1250W.01 Introduction to Poetry

Kate Daniels - Online Synchronous

MTWRF 8:10 - 10:00 PM

 

 

ENGL 1100.02 Composition

Judy Klass - Online Synchronous

MTWRF 11:10 - 1:00 PM 

We will be reading fiction and non-fiction in this class, and while considering what a writer’s objective should be when engaged in each kind of writing. Students themselves will be concentrating concentrate on non-fiction writing: writing persuasive and analytical essays which that employ various rhetorical strategies. Each stage of the writing process is important: carefully considering an issue before choosing one’s thesis, qualifying one’s position if necessary, including substantive examples and specific details, editing out repetition, using transitional words to aid organization and readability, proofreading, and revising drafts of essays. This course is about reading critically, writing in a clear and compelling way, building persuasive arguments, developing confidence in one’s own voice as a writer, and doing research and documenting sources when necessary. [3] (No AXLE credit)

 

ENGL 1260W.02 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Radiant Intertextuality

Jeong-Oh Kim - Online Synchronous

MTWRF 10:10 - 12:00 PM 

 “Radiant Intertextuality” is based on the premise that in a complex world, we must approach problems from many different angles. The current focus on inter- disciplinarity reflects this premise. Yet all too often, interdisciplinarity is treated more as a rhetorical slogan than as an actual practice. Its transformative challenge is reduced to an additive list without clear motivation: philosophy plus literature, anthropology plus history . . . a principle of X Plus Y. We will take the challenge of interdisciplinarity seriously to ask how it changes the way we do things: the questions we ask, the materials we work with, and what we do with those materials. This course will also include work in cognitive studies, helping students engage in a critical reading of neuroscience ethics, particularly the issues related to Neuro-Culture. [3] (HCA)

 

 

Spring 2021 Courses

ENGL 1100.01 Composition: On Begin Human

Thea Autry - Online Synchronous

MWF 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM

Improve your writing and analytical skills by engaging questions of the human person in nonfiction works by such authors as Amy Tan and Elie Wiesel. The texts will model or otherwise facilitate the kind of writing you will be asked to do. Grading is based on four formal papers in multiple genres, paper revisions, and in-class workshops, all designed to prepare you for writing across academic disciplines.

 

ENGL 1100.02 Composition: Comp in the Time of Covid

Joanna Huh - Online Synchronous

TR 2:20 - 3:35 PM

This course will foster an inclusive and intensive environment for exploring, analyzing, and writing around the topic of the Covid-19 pandemic. We will examine the mechanics of composition at the level of sentences, paragraphs, and essays to demystify the college-level essay. We’ll read different types of essays in order to understand the mechanics of writing while conducting in-depth investigations of the three fundamental elements of an essay: analysis, explication, and argumentation. We’ll also analyze distinct styles, structures, and genres as a way to become better rounded and more versatile authors. Each of you will develop a “toolbox” of skills and strategies through focused assignments and readings that will prepare you for collegiate, professional, and personal writing. You will end the semester a more critical thinker, reader, and writer and more adept in communicating your ideas through academic writing conventions.

ENGL 1111.19 FYWS Growing Up Latinx

Candice Amich - Online Synchronous

MWF 9:10 - 10:00 AM

What does it mean to “grow up Latinx” in the multicultural United States? In this course we will survey a broad range of cultural texts that provocatively and poignantly address the issues of language, education, race, migration, class, and gender that influence the development of Latinx children and adolescents. We will pay special attention to coming-of-age stories that explore the psychological and political dimensions of encountering cultural difference and responding to the pressures of assimilation. The short stories, memoirs, essays, poems, journalism, films and video performances we will watch and read challenge their audiences to recognize the rich differences that define the Latinx community in the United States. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

 

ENGL FYWS Existential Fictions 

Mark Schoenfield - In Person

*** This FYWS will be offered twice ***

ENGL 1111.31  |  MW 8:45 - 10:00 AM

ENGL 1111.99  |  MW 1:25 - 2:40 PM

Freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose/Nothing ain’t worth nothing but it’s free…   --“Me and Bobby McGee”

This course begins with traditional existentialists—Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Albert Camus—and their concerns about the dynamics of freedom, social responsibility, and the construction of identity and selfhood.  We will consider themes that emerge from these works, with some emphasis on how problems of fragility and nothingness—the crowd, emptiness, war, absences, longing—influence how these authors understand human consciousness.  As we follow how existential ideas diffuse into popular culture, for example through a series of movies, we will discuss questions about the self thrown into a social world constructed through consumption, gender norms, national allegiances, problems of sustainability and globalization, and economic and technological contingencies.  The course will be discussion based, with two smaller papers leading to a Digital Story project and a culminating paper on a topic selected by each student. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

 

ENGL 1111.33 FYWS The 19th-Century Criminal

Rachel Teukolsky - Online Synchronous

MWF 3:00 - 3:50 PM

Sherlock Holmes, Jekyll and Hyde, Jack the Ripper: the world of Victorian crime has been fascinating us for more than a century. Why did this era become known for classic crime fiction? And how do we analyze this literature’s ongoing appeal? We’ll track the nineteenth-century criminal across a range of materials and media, including Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist; detective stories by Edgar Allen Poe; Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle; and Dion Boucicault’s stage melodrama, The Octoroon. We’ll also watch modern-day film and television adaptations, including the Jack-the-Ripper movie From Hell (2001) and the TV show Sherlock (2010). We will read studies by criminologists, anthropologists, philosophers, and historians of crime. The course will ultimately ask some big questions: What is a criminal? And how has society defined concepts of crime and deviance? [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

 

ENGL 1111.44 FYWS Formations of American Identity

Gabriel Briggs - Online Synchronous

TR 2:20 - 3:35 PM

Decades before the heralded "American Renaissance" in literature that included Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, and Poe, a coterie of American authors created works that shaped America's literary landscape, challenged conventional wisdom, and helped us to imagine alternative literary histories in the United States. This course will examine how early American authors challenged conceptions of national identity in the burgeoning Republic and engaged historical moments of crisis, such as the Indian Removal and slavery. The novels will cut across several literary genres, including American Gothic and Historical Romance, and feature writers such as Lydia Maria Child and Charles Brockden Brown. Repeat credit for students who have completed 115F section 39. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

 

ENGL 1111.45 FYWS WWI: A Hundred Years Later

Andrea Hearn - In Person

MWF 9:10 - 10:00 AM

This course will explore the cultural legacy of the “War to End All Wars” (1914-1918) in three broad phases: we will study texts produced during, shortly after, and well after the conflict to discover what the Great War meant to those who experienced it firsthand, to those who came later, and to us now.  We will engage a range of texts: poems, novels, diaries, letters, films, posters, history, criticism, and a play.  In addition to a variety of formal academic writing assignments in response to our shared texts and a small group presentation on a selected vignette of the war, students will write about a war memoir and film of their choosing. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

ENGL 1210W.01 Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques

Elizabeth Meadows - In Person

MWF 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM

What can the origins and evolutions of the detective novel—and its enduring popularity—tell us about the conventions of prose fiction and the cultural norms of the period in which such novels were written? This course develops critical reading and writing skills by exploring how detective fictions shape and are shaped by the cultural values, concerns, anxieties, and desires of the historical moments in which they are produced and consumed. We will examine detective fiction from its origins in the nineteenth century to its current incarnations, examining how the genre responds to its changing cultural contexts. Three essays, two movie or television reviews, presentations, and lively class participation will determine the majority of your grade. Readings will include works by Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, Walter Mosley, and Tana French. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1220W Drama: Forms and Techniques

Pavneet Aulakh - Online Synchronous

Section 01: TR 9:35 - 10:50 AM

Section 02: TR 11:10 AM - 12:25 PM

Moved to an awareness of his own inaction by an actor’s performance of Hecuba, Hamlet is flummoxed by the actor’s ability to generate emotion for a character far removed from his life. He ponders: “What’s Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba?”. In this course, we will appropriate Hamlet’s question in our study of plays from ancient Greece to the contemporary United States to ask: what are Antigone, Medea, and Othello to us? We will pursue this question not only by reading the works by Sophocles, Euripides, and Shakespeare, , but also by studying more recent plays that have reimagined these characters and staged their continuing relevance to the world we inhabit. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1230W.02 Literature and Analytical Thinking: Missing Persons

Jennifer Gutman - In Person

MWF 10:20 - 11:10 AM

Since the days of 19th-century rogues’ galleries, which classified and publicized criminals through portrait photography, new media technologies have been used in the service of surveillance. Today, the effort to track individual activity within larger spheres of collectivity finds continued expression in systems of digital surveillance, such as facial recognition software and data mining techniques. This class considers the politics of surveillance through recent stories that feature a missing person, whose absence nonetheless registers as a fictional presence. We will pay specific attention to new subject positions that arise out of digital experience, such as “the user” who negotiates the divide between self-promotion and abstraction, the desire to be seen and the right to be forgotten. Students will think critically about their own processes of self-mediation or absention, analyze contemporary literature and media engaged with such questions, and write argumentative essays on this new era of paradoxical anonymity and hypervisibility. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1230W.03 Literature and Analytical Thinking: Ocean and Literature

Jeong-Oh Kim - Hybrid attendance 

MWF 3:00 - 3:50 PM

This course examines the cultural meaning of the sea in British literature and history, from early modern times to the present. Interdisciplinary in conception, it charts metaphorical and material links between the idea of the sea in the cultural imagination and its significance for the social and political history of Britain, offering a fresh analysis of the ocean’s impact on the formation of British cultural identities. We will read and discuss such authors as  William Shakespeare, John Milton, Samuel Coleridge, Walter Scott, Robert Stevenson, Mark Twain, and Rachel Carson, among others. By combining the interests of three related but distinct areas of study—the analysis of sea fiction, critical maritime history, and cultural studies—to highlight the historical meaning of the sea in relation to its textual and cultural representation, this course will offer a new perspective on the nexus between the ocean and literature. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1250W.01 Introduction to Poetry: Poetry of Welness

Wilnide Lindor - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MWF 8:00 - 8:50 AM

Wellness is a conscious, self-directed response to traumatic experiences, depression, anxiety,  and unforeseen disabilities. This course will explore ancient, early modern, and contemporary reflections on mental health and wellness through the work of Ovid, Shakespeare, Emily Dickenson, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sylvia Plath and more. Students will learn to identify form, meter, word choice and poetic movements and will improve their writing skills through revisions and workshops. Course requirements include three formal written assignments: a close-reading paper, a short midterm paper and a research-based final paper. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1250W.02 Introduction to Poetry: William Wordsworth and his Contemporaries

Jeong-oh Kim - Hybrid Attendence

MWF 12:40 - 1:30 PM

Once upon a time a course such as this would have been called “The Age of Wordsworth.” This course assumes no such primacy, but rather conceives of British Romanticism as a movement that is both contested and shifting. The aim is to read Wordsworth not simply with and/ or against Samuel T. Coleridge, but also to position his work against that of the popular narrative poems of Walter Scott and Lord Byron as well as of Shelley and Keats, and against other genres . The syllabus will extend into unfamiliar territory (“The Excursion,” Poems on the Naming of Places, and his early poems, Salisbury Plain) and the late Wordsworth (the Continental Tour poems), where pairings shift: Felicia Hemans and Alfred Tennyson. This course is a series of different perspectives from which to consider Romantic poetry: form, theme, and cultural context. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1250W.03 Introduction to Poetry: The Atmosphere of Romantic Poetry

Jeong-oh Kim - Hybrid Attendence

MWF 1:50 - 2:40 PM

What is atmosphere? Is it air and weather? Or is it the in-between? By examining contemporary concepts of atmosphere in the context of Green-Eco-Environmentaland Geo-Romanticism, we will investigate the landscapes of poetic imagination that inform the Romantic conditions of atmosphere. We are both part of atmosphere and part of different atmospheres— climatic, spatial, psychical, emotional, and material. We will articulate the ways in which we can speak of the “Atmosphere of British Romantic poetry” when we consider the 3 Ms—Message (agents), Method (sources), and Medium (conditions) of atmosphere. We will explore this topic by considering poetic works across a swath of long- Romanticism from Anne Finch to the late Wordsworth. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1250W.04 Introduction to Poetry

Judy Klass - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MWF 4:10 - 5:00 PM

In this course students will develop their skills at writing persuasive essays of literary analysis while gaining more understanding of subtext and more appreciation for the techniques that poets use.  We will read the work of great poets: some ancient, some from several centuries ago, some modern; and we will discuss eras, movements and evolving traditions in this long, ongoing conversation. We will look at poetry that is rhymed, at blank verse, and at free verse. We will  consider how different poets approach certain topics and themes, read some writers in depth, discuss genres and modes, and consider sound, alliteration, symbolism, metaphor.  The main focus of this course will be engaging with the works we read, with the essays you write and with class discussion while at the same time  discovering some wonderful writers. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1250W.05 Introduction to Poetry

Didi Jackson - In Person

TR 11:10 AM - 12:25 PM

Wordsworth said, "Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings.” Much of our music and stories emerge from the ancient art of poetry. In this course, students will explore Wordsworth’s statement by looking at a variety of poetic forms, styles, and subjects.  We will read poems from various historical periods and places while also focusing on poetry of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will consider the poem’s place in history, in social context, and within each students’ personal lexicon. By learning to read and analyze poetry closely, students will become readers of poetry for analysis, for pleasure, and for life. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1250W.06 Introduction to Poetry

Lisa Dordal - Online Synchronous

TR 2:20 - 3:35 PM

In our increasingly fast-paced lives, reading poetry can be a great way to slow down and pay meaningful attention to the world around us and to our own inner landscapes. Although the main objectives of this course are to help you become close readers of poetry and to help you develop your critical writing skills, the poems that we read might very well deepen your understanding of your own life and who you understand yourself to be. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, imagery, figures of speech, sound, etc.). The second part of the course focuses on the poetry of Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Langston Hughes, Marie Howe, Mark Doty, Natasha Trethewey, and Li-Young Lee. Requirements include two papers (plus revisions), short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1260W.01 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Horror Noire: The Black Experience in American Horror

Webster Heath - Online Synchronous

MWF 8:00 - 8:50 AM

From zombies, ghouls, and monsters to complex antiheroes, the horror genre of film has always provocatively explored the notions of race and representation in American popular media. African Americans have been the subject of criticism and fear in American cinema since its inception, but with the turn of the century, films, particularly the horror genre, took  a progressive step forward, depicting African Americans as sympathetic agents. Instead, horror films suggest that the thing to be feared is society itself. . This course will trace the history, characters, and representations of blackness, while also exploring how Black participation in horror has been used to challenge negative representations of Black people. By surveying the genre, this class will address the place of African Americans in Hollywood both on-screen and behind the camera. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1260W.02 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Reading and Writing Black Lives

Ifeoma Nwankwo - Online Synchronous

MWF 1:50 - 2:40 PM

What is “real” Black culture? Who has the right to decide that and to define a “positive” image? What can committed cross-racial allies do to counter racism and discrimination?”? What did Harlem Renaissance era writers, musicians, and intellectuals have to say about these issues? Are their views still valid today? How do their views compare with modern day musicians and word artists’?

We will gain new perspectives on this distinctive era often thought to be one of the most pivotal in American cultural history. Young Black writers, musicians, workers, and soldiers from New York as well as from the U.S. South and the Caribbean birthed exciting innovations in literature, popular music, film, dance, business, and politics. They showed and showed off what they viewed as the inherent richness of their cultures. As they did so, they asked key questions about how Black culture should be understood and presented in the public sphere. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1260W.03 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Freedom and Confinement

Marzia Milazzo - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MW 1:25 - 2:40 PM

Beginning with a reflection on movement restrictions, this course will be concerned with concrete, metaphorical, and discursive borders and the social realities of exclusion, inequality, and privilege that shape them. Through the study of multiple literary genres, we will explore themes such as racial segregation, solitary confinement, the prison industrial complex, and the condition of being undocumented. In the process, we will consider how concepts such as race, gender, sexuality, citizenship and criminality are socially, historically, geographically and discursively constructed, yet have real and crucial implications. Students will be introduced to modes of critical analysis that question how people make meaning through writing and creative expression, and will learn to engage literature from an interdisciplinary perspective, making use of ideas and theories developed in critical race theory as well as gender and sexuality studies. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1260W.05 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Who Wants to be Human? 

Colin Dayan - Online Synchronous

TR 11:10 AM - 12:25 PM

In Melville’s novel Pierre, Isabel roots herself in the living landscape of her dream and loses “the power of being sensible of myself as something human.” Giving affect and sensitivity to the nonhuman, Melville encourages his readers to confront the limits and dangers of that value-laden term “humanity.” In this seminar, we will examine that uncertain reservoir on which all creatures might draw but from which most humans have learned to cut themselves off completely. Instead of opposing humans to animals, how can we best question the limits of humanity? At this time of pious surmises about humane treatment, teacup dogs (sized to fit the human palm) and all kinds of hybrids produced for consumption by people, we need to forego the question of how and where we draw the line between humans and animals. Instead, we need to apprehend how and why human beings, often quite arbitrarily, devise, formulate and apply the lines separating human and animal—or deliberately blur them. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1270W.01 Introduction to Literary Criticsm 

Elizabeth Covington - In Person

MWF 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM

This course is an introduction to various forms of literary and cultural criticism. We will study several “schools” of theory in order to understand some of the diverse ways we understand literature and all manner of cultural objects, including advertising, social media, and films. We will begin with an analysis of the mock-horror film, “Tucker and Dale vs. Evil” and continue reading theory side-by-side with stories of horror and mystery. By analyzing these stories and films in terms of literary and cultural theory, we will learn how to engage literature and culture on many new and exciting levels. [3] (HCA)

ENGL 2311 Representative British Writers (1660 - present)

Scott Juengel - Hybrid Attendance 

TR 3:55 - 5:10 PM

This course will take its catalog title to heart, albeit with a twist.  This survey of British literature from 1660 to our contemporary moment will focus on twelve representative texts across three centuries, roughly one text per generation (approximately 25-30 years).  Some selections will be as short as a single lyric poem; others will be as substantial as a full-length autobiography or novel.  The goal will be to sample a wide range of literary forms—satire, comedy, romance, lyric, essay, narrative poetry, diaries, graphic novels, etc.—while also thinking about literary history as a sequence of generational shifts and intergenerational dialogues.  In sum, literature glimpsed from an evolutionary perspective.  While the selection of specific texts is still to be determined, we could read works by Aphra Behn, Jonathan Swift, Thomas Gray, Jane Austen, Mathew Arnold, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Muriel Spark, Alan Moore and others. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 2316W Representative American Writers 

Gabriel Briggs - Online Synchronous

Section 01: TR 11:10 AM - 12:25 PM

Section 02: TR 12:45 - 2:00 PM

This course will cover the rise of the novel in the United States from the end of the revolutionary period to the 1850s. We will read the work of authors who dominate American literary history, such as Charles Brockden Brown, James Fenimore Cooper, and Herman Melville. But we will also study other writers who challenge conventional wisdom, who help us to imagine alternative literary histories in the U.S.  In our reading, we will focus on two related questions: how does the novel capture the social and political pressures of a particular historical moment? Where is the line between fiction and history, dreams and reality? The novels we will examine cut across several literary genres, including the Sentimental Novel, the American Gothic, and the Historical Romance; and we will attempt  to understand and to theorize the relationship between literary and historical writing. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 2319 World Literature, Modern

Akshya Saxena - Online Synchronous

TR 11:10 AM - 2:25 PM

Do Instagram influencers and US Presidents tell you what to read? This course examines practices of global literary production, circulation, and reception that create something called “world literature.” Everything about the idea of world literature is disputed—its origin story, its representations of the world, its claims to define literature. Yet, since Goethe arguably coined the phrase in the 19th century, scholars and lay readers alike have been enthralled by it as a pinnacle of human achievement, a literature-without-borders. How did this come to be? This course dives deep into literary works from around the world that are considered world literature. Along the way, it asks big questions about our literary institutions and habits: who decides what is world literature and what makes the cut? Does this literature reflect or redress the inequality of the world? How do translations, book prizes, reviews, and controversies shape the “literary” and “worldly”? Readings by Rupi Kaur, Han Kang, Marjane Satrapi, Arundhati Roy, and JM Coetzee among others. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 2330W Introduction to Environmental Humanities

Teresa Goddu - Online Synchronous

MW 4:10 - 5:30 PM

Do you want to learn about the world from the point of view of trees? In this interdisciplinary, place-based course, we will bring the trees that surround us on campus into conversation with Richard Powers’ environmental epic, The Overstory (2018). We will study trees from an array of perspectives—scientific, artistic, historical, social—as we investigate such topics as how trees communicate and form communities, how they shape and are shaped by human environments, whether they should have rights, and how they are represented in art and literature. We will keep a tree journal and do a collaborative tree project as we study how stories can teach humans to better understand their relationship to the more-than-human world. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3312 The Medieval World: Fabulous History and Cultural Fantasy in the Middle Ages: Monsters, Race, and Nationhood.

Pavneet Aulakh - Online Synchronous

TR 2:20 - 3:35 PM

We’ve never been more medieval. From politics to pop culture, yearnings for, and fears of, a return to a Western medieval past saturate the present. To understand our historical moment, this course returns to medieval England and examines what it meant to be English, particularly in light of England’s complex relation to continental Europe and the East. Recently at the forefront of the Brexit debate, these questions in fact go back to the stories medieval English people constructed about their origins. Studying these narratives, we will consider the foreignness at the heart of England’s founding myths and the role of historical amnesia as well as religious and racial discrimination in the forging of national identity. To flesh out our understanding of the medieval world, we will enlarge our study of English literature with readings from Continental and Middle Eastern texts, including Jewish accounts of the first crusades, Muslim narratives of their own encounters with Europeans, and The Arabian Nights. [3] (Pre-1800 Requirement, P)

 

ENGL 3332W Renaissance Drama

Julia Fesmire - Online Synchronous

TR 12:45 - 2:00 PM

As poet Ben Jonson, a contemporary of Shakespeare, noted, the Bard was “not of an age but for all time!”  His assessment certainly seems prescient, as Shakespeare often seems the only poet associated with the English Renaissance; yet, he did not work in a vacuum.  Dozens of poets composed and co-created hundreds of plays between 1567, when the Red Lion playhouse was erected, and the closing of the theatres in 1642.  In this course, we will study the best (and perhaps some of the worst) plays, interludes, and entertainments.  We will encounter revenge, crossdressing, illicit sex, severed appendages, a carved-out heart on a dagger, and a bitten-out tongue.  Literary analysis will include discussions of gender, class, sexuality, medicine, religion, witchcraft, and popular culture.  We will attempt to understand the ways in which each text not only reflects but responds to and shapes aspects of the culture from which it arose.  We will appreciate not only plays that are not “Shakespearian,” but how the Renaissance as a whole raised and grappled with a range of questions relevant to us today.  We will examine the works of Marlowe, Kyd, Ford, and Webster, among others. [3] (Pre-1800 Requirement, HCA)

 

ENGL 3333.01 How to Think About Shakespeare?

Lynn Enterline / Peter Lake - Online Asynchronous

MWF 1:50 - 2:40 PM

How  do we think about Shakespeare? Team-taught by an historian and a literary critic, this lecture course allows you to consider this question from two angles. The readings are arranged chronologically over the course of Shakespeare’s career and cover all genres of his writing. We will read each work in light of contemporary historical events as well as literary history and theory. On one hand, we will examine his work in the context of 16th century religious and political issues as well as the way his contemporaries read and thought about those issues. On the other, we will explore the impact of rhetorical training and ancient literary invention on Shakespeare’s modes of invention as well as his representations of subjectivity, gender, and emotion. Though historicist and literary-theoretical approaches are sometimes thought to be incompatible, this course will encourage student to think how they can be put into conversation. [3](Pre-1800 Requirement, HCA)

 

ENGL 3336 Shakespeare: Shakespeare with a Difference

Joanna Huh - Online Synchronous

TR 3:55 - 5:10 PM

In the wake of Black Lives Matter protests across the nation, the rise of what Michelle Alexander calls The New Jim Crow, and the specter of death that haunts our cultural spaces from churches to nightclubs, it would be understandable for anyone to ask: why does Shakespeare even matter? And yet, as the symbol of genius, transcendence, and timelessness—a metaphor for the greatness of Western culture—it is imperative that we free Shakespeare from being white property. This course historicizes the “whitening” of Shakespeare and European culture, recognizing instead multiple, multicultural, accessible Shakespeares. We might, for instance, read Shakespeare’s The Tempest alongside Aimé Césaire’s Une Tempête and Gayatri Spivak’s “Can the Subaltern Speak?” or Othello with Franz Fanon’s Black Skin/White Masks and Keith Hamilton Cobb’s American Moor. Such pairings through the vectors of race, gender, and sexuality will help us see how the past has shaped our current circumstances. [3] (Pre-1800 Requirement, HCA)

 

ENGL 3337 Shakespeare (Part 2)

Kathryn Schwarz - Online Synchronous

MWF 12:40 - 1:30 PM

This course focuses on the second half of Shakespeare’s career, examining clusters of plays that invite us to think across genres. How do questions about social roles and personal bonds link a tragedy such as Othello to a comedy such as Twelfth Night? How might The Winter’s Tale illuminate both the mythic grandeur of Antony and Cleopatra and the political cynicism of King Lear? Given that Measure for Measure and Macbeth were written in close proximity, how can this help us analyze the specificities of form? Throughout the semester, we’ll take various angles on what might broadly be termed politics: the politics of nationalism, gender, history, violence, identity, and community.

Discussions will consider both early histories of production and more recent readings, stagings, and adaptations for new media. Course requirements include a group presentation, a midterm paper, research assignments, thematic meditations, and regular class participation. *Note: It is not necessary to take English 3336 as a prerequisite for English 3337. [3] (Pre-1800 Requirement, HCA)

 

ENGL 3348 Milton

Jessie Hock - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MW 4:10 - 5:30 PM

Poet, prophet, and revolutionary, John Milton (1608-1674) is one of the most influential English writers of all time. This course covers his major works, from the early English poems and major prose through Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. [3] (Pre-1800 Requirement, HCA)

 

ENGL 3614 The Victorian Period: The 19th-Century Criminal

Rachel Teukolsky - Online Synchronous

MWF 1:50 - 2:40 PM

Sherlock Holmes, Jekyll and Hyde, Jack the Ripper: the world of Victorian crime has been fascinating us for more than a century. Why did this era become known for classic crime fiction? And how do we analyze this literature’s ongoing appeal? We’ll track the nineteenth-century criminal across a range of materials and media, including Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist; detective stories by Edgar Allen Poe; Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle; and Dion Boucicault’s stage melodrama, The Octoroon. We’ll also watch modern-day film and television adaptations, including the Jack-the-Ripper movie From Hell (2001) and the TV show Sherlock (2010). We will read studies by criminologists, anthropologists, philosophers, and historians of crime. The course will ultimately ask some big questions: What is a criminal? And how has society defined concepts of crime and deviance? [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3654W.01 African American Literature: Twentieth and Twenty-first Century African American Poetry

Anthony Reed - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

TR 12:45 - 2:00 PM

Our survey of African American verse culture will situate poetry in the broader context of American society and culture, paying special attention to perennial debates among African American writers over the relationship between race, poetry, and literary form. We will read poets associated with the Harlem Renaissance, the modernist poets of the 1940s and 1950s, the politically assertive Black Arts era, and contemporary poets. Rather than an exhaustive survey, we will attend to matters of form in selected works from major figures. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Robert Hayden, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Rita Dove, Claudia Rankine and others. [3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, US)

 

ENGL 3654W.02 African American Literature: Slavery's Fiction

Anthony Reed - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

TR 2:20 - 3:35 PM

This course will take a broad view of the fictions of racial slavery and its many afterlives in the Americas. Focusing primarily on contemporary narratives of slavery, this seminar will consider the strategies of representing slavery as moral, political and economic crisis and as everyday reality. We will pay special attention to the strategies of representing slavery as quotidian and organize our reading around such difficult questions as the technical and ethical limits of representation, the voices and narratives authors tend to privilege or suppress, and the balance of aesthetic and political concerns. . Beginning with canonical narratives by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, contemporary writers may include Dionne Brand, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, and others. Throughout our readings, we will also track shifting definitions of slavery and freedom. Finally, we will pay attention to the ways race and gender interact in shifting understandings of national belonging, as well as the shifting standards and values of accuracy when addressing historical trauma. [3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, US)

 

ENGL 3658 Latino and Latina American Literature: Testimonio

Lorraine Lopez - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MWF 9:10 - 10:00 AM

The course focuses on life stories, or testimonio, by writers who are inculcated in the US experience and self-identify as Latinx.  Despite its complicated history, testimonio proves a powerful tool for bearing witness and generating knowledge, while articulating nuances of cultural and personal identity.  As such, we will read, discuss, present on, and write about life stories by men and women of Latin-American heritage who primarily live and write in the U.S.  Assigned reading includes memoir, creative nonfiction, and/or personal essays by Fred Arroyo, Joy Castro, Jaquira Díaz, Alex Espinoza, Reyna Grande, Daisy Hernandez, Carmen Maria Machado and Sergio Troncoso, among others.  Literary models will be placed within historical contexts as we examine how race, culture, sexual identity and orientation, social class, and language shape life experiences and literary production by Latinx authors.  The final project provides options for students similarly to explore autobiographic or biographic writing. [3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, P)

 

ENGL 3670 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature: Accent

Akshya Saxena - Online Synchronous

TR 3:55 - 5:10 PM

Everyone has an accent but not all accents are created equal. Some are heard as neutral and others as markers of difference. This simple fact has serious implications in the real world: accent discrimination costs jobs, housing applications, and asylum claims. How do voices and accents resonate in English literature and criticism? Do narrators and literary voices have accents, the way people do? This course probes practices of reading, writing, and criticism as accented—as textual sites that consolidate or reject difference. Course readings include literary and visual representations of accented English as well as interdisciplinary scholarship on race and voice (e.g. brown voice, white voice, “Mock Asian,” Black English), the cybernetic voices of virtual assistants like Siri, listening in the courtroom, and call centers. Students will interrogate the politics of accent in literature, while learning to use their own accented voices to produce critical readings and informed social interventions. [3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, HCA)

 

ENGL 3678 Anglophone African Literature: Post-Apartheid South African Literature

Marzia Milazzo - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MW 8:45 - 10:00 AM

This course focuses on South African literature in English, with an emphasis on post-1994 works by young Black writers that creatively capture the hustle and bustle of everyday life in the aftermath of apartheid. Beginning with an assessment of colonialism, segregation, and resistance, we will examine contemporary South African novels with an eye towards the experiences of young people. We will also analyze the impact that the philosophy of Black Consciousness and the vision of justice developed by anti-apartheid leader Steve Biko continue to exercise upon writers and activists. Through the study of works that will take us to from Cape Town to Johannesburg and from the colonial to the contemporary era, the course aims not only to provide students with key insights into the exciting post-apartheid literary landscape, but also to equip them with an understanding of actual challenges that shape ordinary life in present-day South Africa, especially challenges that affect the young. [3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, INT)

 

ENGL 3692 Desire in America: Literature, Cinema, and History: American Cool

Ifeoma Nwankwo - Online Synchronous

MWF 3:00 - 3:50 PM

What do we want and why? Desire figures prominently in film, media, music, literature all around the world, including here in the US. Sexual desire, desire for consumer goods, and desire for particular kinds of experiences or adventures are only a few examples of kinds of desire that surface every day in the popular media we encounter daily. Also figuring prominently are conceptions and images of what’s “cool.”

Through this course we will deepen our understanding of the national and international dynamics of desire and coolness, especially as they relate to masculinity, race, class, and mobility. We will consider questions such as: how do US Americans and people in other countries factor into the shaping of each others’ desires and definitions of cool? What can understanding these international dynamics tell us about ourselves as individuals as about what being human means in our world today? [3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, US)

 

ENGL 3728W Science Fiction: The Afro-Futurist Work of Octavia Butler

Vera Kutzinski - Online Synchronous

TR 2:20 - 3:35 PM

This seminar gives you the rare opportunity to explore in depth the work of perhaps the best-known African American science fiction writer. The questions that Butler Octavia (1947-2006) raises are have become increasingly urgent in our country: What is the afterlife of slavery? How do we think and write about it? How do we imagine the future of the human species and of so-called Others in particular? How do we survive the violence that anti-black racism, along with persistent sexism and gender discrimination, has produced in our societies? What alternatives to such violence become thinkable in other temporal locations? After Kindred, which you may have encountered before, we will read the Patternist series (1976-1984); the Xenogenesis series (1987-1989); the Earthseed series (1993-1998), and her last novel, Fledgling (2005), along with some of Butler’s many interviews and select academic scholarship. This course is both reading- and writing-intensive. [3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, P)

 

ENGL 3734W Literature and Law: Guilty Things: Forfeiture, Legal Language, and Personhood in the United States

Colin Dayan - Online Synchronous

TR 12:45 - 2:00 PM

    In the United States, many forms of death wreak havoc on the lives of the weak, racially suspect, and politically unpopular. Forfeiture operates like a virulent infection to intimidate, control, and debase humans and non-humans. Unlike criminal forfeiture, civil forfeiture proceeds against the offending property, not the person: so, if your car carried (without your knowledge) illegal drugs, the car is forfeited—given up—to the state.
    Law enforcement has grown increasingly dependent on this failsafe way to make money. A piece of property doesn’t have the rights of a person; so, instead of proving crime beyond “a reasonable doubt,” suspicion — “probable cause” — is enough. Your property is guilty until proven innocent. With civil forfeiture, owners don’t have to be charged with a crime, let alone be convicted, to lose homes, cars, cash—even dogs.
    We will read novels, case law, and memoirs, including writings by Charles Brockden Brown, Beverley Tucker, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Denis Johnson, Jesmyn Ward, Kiese Laymon, and Cormac McCarthy. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3742 Feminist Theory

Candice Amich - Online Synchronous

MWF 10:20 - 11:10 AM

An introduction to feminist theory, this course is designed to provide you with the basic skills necessary to use gender as a tool of cultural analysis. We will read theory from and about twentieth-century “second-wave” feminism, as well as explore more recent queer and transgender engagements with feminism. Rubrics of study include gender and difference, gender and media, and gender and globalization. In addition to theoretical texts, we will examine a variety of feminist media, including poetry, performance, and film. Research projects derived from students’ individual interests will be an important part of understanding the theory. [3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, P)

 

ENGL 3892W Problems in Literature: Mysticism and Literature

Alex Dubilet - Online Synchronous

MW 4:10 - 5:30 PM

What is mysticism? What are its mode of speech, its conceptual operations, and its forms of experience? What texts have been written and categorized under the rubric of mysticism? What relevance have mystical figures and forms had for contemporary literature and theoretical reflection? This course will answer these and related questions by asking students to explore  mysticism from a variety of methodological perspectives: literary critical, historical, speculative, art historical, and sociological. Over the course of the semester, we will explore mysticism in relation to writing and speech, negation, law and the political, gender, and literary form. The course will introduce students to texts from a variety of historical periods (medieval, early modern, modern) and help them think about the afterlives of those texts in the contemporary world. [3] (Pre-1800 Requirement, HCA)

 

ENGL 3894W.01 Major Figures: Cormac McCarthy

Thea Autry - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MWF 12:40 - 1:30 PM

By turns violent and lush, romantic and surreal, Cormac McCarthy’s literary landscape is often the site of compelling paradoxes; in this way, it says much to us about the human condition. Students will explore the depth and range of a writer that many include among William Faulkner's literary heirs, and that the Times Literary Supplement recently acknowledged as an “American genius.” McCarthy’s uniquely American mythology includes such iconic figures as a demoniacal mercenary roving the western plains; a single father protecting his son against the apocalypse; a bogeyman on a mission; and two star-crossed lovers. We will read five of McCarthy’s major novels -- including No Country for Old Men and The Road -- as well as critical responses to those works. Final grade will be based on participation, a presentation, and three formal writing assignments, including a comparative study of a McCarthy novel and its film adaptation.[3] (Diverse Perspectives Requirement, HCA)

 

ENGL 3896W Special Topics in Investigating Writing in America: Environmental Journalism: Investigating Climate Change

Amanda Little - In Person 

W 12:10 - 3:00 PM

This environmental journalism course explores the science, the solutions, the players, the politics, the history, and the local impacts of climate change. Students will pursue their own local reporting, investigating the effects of climate change and the emerging green economy in Nashville. You'll learn the rudiments of good environmental journalism and are welcome to join with or without previous journalism experience. This course aims to change the way you think about the importance and impact of storytelling, the way you write about complex topics with accessible and engaging prose, and the way you participate in the time of crisis and progress we live in. [1-3; maximum of 6 credits total] (No AXLE credit)

ENGL 1101 Creative Writing Tutorial: Fiction 

Hassaan Mirza - Online Synchronous

Individual instruction in writing fiction. Offered on a pass/fail basis only. Not open to students who have completed 3851 section 07. [1] (No AXLE credit)

 

ENGL 1240.01 Beginning Nonfiction Workshop

Justin Quarry - In Person

TR 12:45 - 2:00 PM

What is creative nonfiction?  If you're asking yourself that question--well, you're certainly not the only one.  In this workshop, novice writers will explore this ever-evolving genre, which includes, among others, personal essay and literary journalism--and they'll try their hands at storytelling in each of these categories, producing at least two pieces to be read and critiqued by the class in a workshop setting.  To help writers draft and revise their work,students will examine the ways in which authors and critics have defined and redefined the genre, studying factual accuracy, point of view, tone, and the incorporation of literary techniques more often seen in fiction.  No previous creative writing experience is necessary for this class. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1280.01 Beginning Fiction Workshop

Yi Jiang - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MWF 10:20 - 11:10 AM

Stephen King once wrote, “If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.” Through readings, writing exercises, and a workshop format where you’ll generate your own stories, you will learn to read and think like a writer by analyzing and trying to understand how elements of a writer’s craft—characterization, detail, setting, etc.—help shape narratives.  

But a story is not just a collection of parts to create a whole. People write to communicate deeper truths, stir the emotions of readers, and connect with people. It’s for this reason storytelling has existed since humans learned language. As Margaret Atwood says, “You’re never going to kill storytelling because it’s built into the human plan. We come with it.” So, you’ll also be exploring the question: what stories do you want to tell? [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1280.02 Beginning Fiction Workshop

Rebecca Kantor - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MWF 1:50 - 2:40 PM

How do writers create cohesive, engrossing, affecting experiences for their audiences? What does fiction reveal to us? In this introductory class, we will explore the art and practice of the literary short story. This course will introduce students to the contemporary short story, familiarizing them with crucial elements of craft. We will read  a selection of short stories from a broad range of voices, both original and translated, and analyze how elements of each piece build a unique, successful literary experience for the reader. We’ll also pay attention to aspects of impactful writing which are innovative and avoid easy categorization. Each student will practice the art of  constructing compelling narratives by writing two original short stories to be discussed in workshop. Throughout the class, we will develop our critical instincts and practice responding constructively to stories in a standard writers’ workshop environment [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1280.03 Beginning Fiction Workshop

Tony Earley - Online Synchronous

M 2:10 - 5:00 PM

Ghost stories: we’re going to read them, tell them and, most importantly, write them. Why do all cultures tell ghost stories? What do those stories reveal about the culture and individuals who produce them? Why are the best ghost stories never only about the ghost? As we ask these questions, we’ll tour the basic precincts of story-making: point-of-view, character, landscape, plot. You’ll write and revise fiction of various lengths, as well as read, critique and discuss the stories written by your peers. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1280.04 Beginning Fiction Workshop

Chelsea Novello - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

TR 11:10 AM - 12:25 PM

This course is an introduction to fiction writing, therefore students need no prior knowledge or experience. Any skill requires practice to improve, and much of our practice will come from learning to read and think like a writer. This will mean paying close attention to construction and craft elements, such as point of view, setting, characterization, pacing, and psychic distance, while also considering how to apply these elements to your stories. But every great story also has a beating heart, a magic to it that cannot fully be explained by mechanics, and we will discuss that too. Throughout this course, you will be expected to read and write a lot. Good writers are passionate readers. You’ll be presenting developed, original stories twice during the semester, and shorter pieces at other times. We'll begin with short writings, reading, and discussion, and after several weeks we’ll begin workshop. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1290.01 Beginning Poetry Workshop

Jessica Lee - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MWF 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM

Why does one poem move us more than others? What is the poet doing on the page and how does it affect us as readers? These are some of the many questions we will explore in this beginning poetry workshop that will help you learn to read and write poems with attention to craft.

Throughout the semester, we will read published poems and craft essays for instruction and inspiration. You will keep a writer’s notebook, complete generative exercises, write and revise your own poems, reflect on your work and process, and participate actively in our writing community by giving and receiving workshop feedback. Critiquing poems is another opportunity to practice thinking and reading like a poet, which is to say, giving your peers feedback will improve your own writing. Curiosity and a love of language are the only prerequisites for this introductory course; no prior poetry experience is required. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 1290.02 Beginning Poetry Workshop

Maria Carlos - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MWF 1:50 - 2:40 PM

This introductory course is designed to help you develop the reading and writing skills necessary for making poems: by studying the literary elements that give it both music and meaning, we will challenge and expand our notions of what a poem can be and how it might function. Your creative work and that of your peers will be our primary texts for analysis and discussion; to supplement your learning, we’ll study published poems and craft essays and attend virtual community readings, using a blend of online synchronous and asynchronous methods to facilitate workshops, discussions, and writing activities. By the end of the semester, you’ll have a small collection of polished poems and a foundational lexicon for discussing and analyzing literary techniques; more broadly, you’ll become a stronger writer, develop deeper and more attentive reading and revision processes, and have a revivified approach to the craft of poetry.  [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3210 Intermediate Nonfiction Workshop: The Short Personal Essay

Justin Quarry - In Person

T 3:10 - 6:00 PM

How do you tell a personal story in a short space, for a wide audience?  How do you shape your experiences into art?  In this workshop, students identify the parts of their lives rich with resonance and discovery—from day-to-day happenings to landmark moments—and craft them for the page with the goal of compelling readers.  Students will read two texts on the art of the personal essay as well as a diverse selection of essays by contemporary writers; and they will write four essays of varying lengths (two of 100 words, two of 1500-1750 words), all of which are then workshopped by their professor and peers.  The final project consists of revisions of all essays.  Of particular emphasis in students’ reading and writing is the broad topic of relationships—familial, platonic, romantic, etc.—to produce potential (but not required) submissions for, among others, the college contest editions of the “Tiny Love Stories” and “Modern Love” columns in The New York Times. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3220 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop: The Art and Craft of Opinion Writing

Amanda Little - In Person

W 3:10 - 6:00 PM

This advanced creative writing workshop explores the landscape of contemporary opinion and op-ed writing. We'll read and critique newspaper op-ed pages, contemporary manifestoes, blogs and social media. Students will craft opinion pieces on topics ranging from celebrity culture to social justice and climate change. Taught by an investigative writer and a columnist for Bloomberg covering the environment and politics, students will explore the lines that divide "objective" reporting and subjective opining, and examine the tactics and techniques at the core of persuasive writing. Students will be encouraged to comment on current events, publish their own blogs throughout the semester, and submit their best work for publication in print and on online platforms. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3220] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3230.01 Intermediate Fiction Workshop 

Sheba Karim - Online Synchronous

TR 9:35 - 10:50 AM

“There's a point, around the age of twenty, when you have to choose whether to be like everybody else the rest of your life, or to make a virtue of your peculiarities.”  

– Ursula K. Le Guin 

In this intermediate level workshop, we will continue to develop and refine craft and narrative techniques to help you explore your “peculiarities” as a writer, thinker, and citizen of the world.  The heart of this course is the workshop, the development and discussion of your own creative work.  Students will read and discuss published fiction and essays on craft, compose and revise one to two original short stories, read and critique original narratives by peers, complete writing exercises, and respond to two literary events. The final for the course will consist of a significant revision of the story written for this class. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3230] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3230.02 Intermediate Fiction Workshop 

Nancy Reisman - Online Synchronous

W 12:10 - 3:00 PM

What images, characters, situations, dynamics, and mysteries have captured your attention, or haunted you? What discoveries await? What material, style, and methods of storytelling interest you the most, and how can you best access your material? This workshop is a place for writers with some fiction writing background to delve into the sources of your work, deepen your knowledge of craft and technique, expand your understanding of fiction’s possibilities and take some new creative risks. We’ll consider fiction’s necessary mysteries, a broad range of approaches to form, and how clear representation of time, dramatic space/place, and perspective shape reader experience. In our readings, we’ll consider flash fiction and mainly character-based literary short stories from varied approaches, (realist, magical realist/fabulist/surrealist, meta-fiction, formalist). We’ll also consider connections to other artistic and literary forms. The core of the workshop will be your original work and the work of your peers, including individual and group responses to workshop fiction.   

Kindly note:

1) this course will not involve fictional forms/genres that rely on world-building, invented realms, and/or certain other genre specialization (i.e. fantasy, alternate world sci-fi, horror, fan fiction, romance, religious or classically-referenced allegory). 

2) This workshop is Immersion-adaptable.

For the Intermediate level workshop, interested writers should register for the wait-list, as instructor permission is required.  Permission will be based primarily on a brief writing sample. At the end of course selection, I’ll send guidelines to everyone on the wait-list, along with a short questionnaire. Previous fiction workshop experience strongly recommended. Writers are welcome to apply for admission to more than one fiction writing workshop but may only enroll in one fiction workshop per semester. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3230] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3240 Advanced Fiction Workshop

Lorrie Moore - In Person

W 12:10 - 3:00 PM

An advanced hands-on story-writing workshop, recommended for those who have prior experience with creative writing workshops and who like to discuss how sentences and narratives might be organized.  In addition to writing short stories we will be reading and discussing published work. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3240] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3250 Intermediate Poetry Workshop

Major Jackson - Online Synchronous

TR 9:35 - 10:50 AM

The objective of this course is to deepen students’ awareness of how poems are made but to also cultivate habits of writing that allow for artistic and personal growth. Emphasis on craft in this course will be focused on poetic form, imagery, metaphor, syntax, and rhythm. By exploring the possibilities of language, students will learn how writing is a practice that engages the full dimensions of human intellect and feeling where curiosity, risk, uncertainty, and openness are essential to the act of creation. The course is offered as a series of workshops with practical hands-on sessions devoted to in-class writing, revision, and group discussions of model poems by contemporary and canonized writers. In an intermediate course, students are expected to exhibit an even greater discipline and seriousness requisite to creating new works of literary merit. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3250] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3260 Advanced Poetry Workshop

Kate Daniels - Online Synchronous

M 3:10 - 6:00 PM

This is an advanced workshop in writing poetry for students with experience.  Students will read several volumes of poetry, attend the Vanderbilt Visiting Writers (poets only) Series, and write five original poems which will be submitted for critique by the workshop.  Other requirements include: written responses to peer poems, oral presentation on one of the assigned books, written responses to assigned exercises and visiting poet events, preparation of a portfolio of the semester’s work, and two 1:1 conferences with the instructor. NOTE:  Potential students must be approved for admission. Register for the class, and wait to be contacted by the professor. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3260] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3891.01 Special Topics in Creative Writing: Love Stories

Lorrie Moore - In Person

M 3:10 - 6:00 PM

As the lyricist Johnny Burke once wrote: Love is tearful, or it's gay/It’s a problem or it's play/It’s a heartache either way (“But Beautiful”). So often the subject of songs, love is only sometimes the subject of literary narrative. In this class we will look at a selection of love stories beginning with Boccaccio and Shakespeare but then leaping ahead into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries: what constitutes a love story? What is it trying to tell us about human love in all its romantic variety and drama? How is the subject returned to for purposes of storymaking and what do narratives about love have in common with one another through the years...Reading will likely include stories from Chekhov, Katherine Anne Porter, Raymond Carver, Annie Proulx, Junot Diaz, Alice Munro and others. Some weekly writing required. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3891.02 Special Topics in Creative Writing: Autobiography and Personal Memoir

Kate Daniels - Online Synchronous

R 3:10 - 6:00 PM

In this advanced workshop, we will explore the literary genre of autobiography.  Our particular focus will be on contemporary examples.  Readings include personal memoir, graphic narrative, hybrid nonfiction, and poetry.   Over the course of the semester, students will write their own extended autobiographical essay, working in stages and doing numerous process exercises.  Requirements: attendance, discussion, written responses to assigned books and writing exercises, two oral presentations, one short essay focused on one of the assigned books, and a final personal autobiography of 15 pages in length.  Reading list:  Fun Home, Alison Bechdel;  A Glass of Water Beneath My Bed, Daisy Hernandez;  Jane: A Memoir, Maggie Nelson; Tap Out, Edgar Kunzand The Beautiful Struggle, Ta-Nehisi Coates.  NOTE:  Potential students must be approved for admission. Register for the class, and wait to be contacted by the professor. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3891.03 Special Topics in Creative Writing: The Craft of Ekphrasis

Didi Jackson - In Person

T 3:10 - 6:00 PM

The Romantic poet William Blake said that poetry and art are ways to converse with paradise. So, it is no wonder that these two forms intersect and feed off of one another in his work and in the poetry of so many others. Poetry and the visual arts have been wedded since the ancient Greeks, and luckily the tradition of poems engaging in some sort of dialogue with visual works of art (be it paintings, sculpture, media installations, etc.) is still alive and well today in the works of such poets at Natasha Trethewey, Diane Seuss, Yusef Komunyakaa, Kevin Young, David Wojahn, Jorie Graham, Sylvia Plath, Robin Coste Lewis, and many others. In this course we will study a thematic array of ekphrastic poems based on several diverse ways to approach and engage with the visual arts. Once students immerse themselves in this poetic style, they then will apply these techniques to their own poetry. [3] (HCA)

 

ENGL 3711 Literature and Intellectual History: Materialisms 

Jessie Hock - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

MW 2:10 - 3:25 PM

Recent years have seen calls in a wide range of disciplines—literary studies, philosophy, science studies, and more—for a return to matter. The divide between systems of thought that admit both corporeals and incorporeals (body and spirit, for example) and those that acknowledge only matter is deep and old, stretching in the western tradition back to ancient Greece. This course takes up contemporary calls for a new materialism and considers the status of appeals to matter in different theoretical traditions: feminism, queer studies, Marxism, deconstruction, ecocriticism, and more. These new materialisms all appeal to “old" materialisms, such as the classical atomist philosophy espoused by the Roman poet Lucretius or the early modern materialism of Spinoza. While the contemporary turn to materialism is generally understood to be a reaction against deconstructive theory’s emphasis on language, we will pay special attention to literary genealogies of materialism from antiquity to the present.  [3] (HCA, ca cumulative 3.4 G.P.A. is required)

 

ENGL 3894W.02 Major Figures: James Joyce

Mark Wollaeger - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

TR 11:10 AM - 12:25 PM

In 1922 Ulysses hit the international literary scene like a thunderbolt. Rather than march through Joyce’s earlier major works, we’ll first read The Odyssey (composed in order to make Ulysses possible), and Hamlet (written to provide material for Stephen Dedalus’s theory of Shakespeare). The course will thus focus on an intertextual approach in order to grasp Ulysses not just as a day in the life of Stephen, Leopold and Molly Bloom (June 16, 1904), but as a web of nodal points that imagined the internet 50 years before its invention and forever changed the way novels are read. Although Ulysses has been described as extraordinarily difficult, approached in the right spirit – jocoseriously – it’s also a lot of fun: Stephen is a sourpuss, but Bloom is hilarious, Joyce more so. An honors seminar, the course also addresses critical and theoretical conversations that have arisen around Joyce over the last century.  [3] (HCA, ca cumulative 3.4 G.P.A. is required)

 

ENGL 4999 Honors Thesis

Mark Wollaeger - Online Synchronous/Asynchronous

TR 8:00 - 9:15 AM

For students who have successfully been admitted to the honors program and completed the Honors Colloquium course.  In this course, students develop their individual honors thesis, working with advisors, the Writing Studio, and their cohort. The thesis experience concludes with an oral examination on the thesis topic. [3] (No AXLE credit)

Gender and Sexuality Studies

GSS 2259W: Reading and Writing Lives

Nancy Reisman - Online Synchronous

TR 9:35 - 10:50 am 

"What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open.” This was the poet Muriel Rukeyser’s view, and this course takes on significant ways of telling, illuminating truths, bearing witness to other lives, using language and image to convey one’s own vision. “Reading and Writing Lives” is a hybrid of textual readings, artist conversations, discussion of craft, and original writing.  The course material will focus primarily but not exclusively on the lives of women and girls, and will include a visiting artist series with writers/artists about their work.  We’ll consider stories, poems, essays, graphic novel,  personal documentary film, among other forms.  This is a W class, and the writing will include short response papers and a related longer analytical piece.  We’ll also delve into storytelling in very short creative fiction and nonfiction (flash forms).  No previous creative writing experience required. [3] (HCA)

 

Jewish Studies

JS 2230W: American Southern Jews in Life and Literature

Adam Meyer - Online Synchronous

MWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm

From colonial times to the present. Interactions between Southern Jews and other Southerners, and between Southern and Northern Jews. The Civil War, Jewish economic activities, and the civil rights movement. [3] (US)

 

Comprehensive ENGL Course Catalog

Not all courses are offered in all semesters. If you need specific courses to meet major, minor, or AXLE requirements, please work with your academic adviser to ensure that you time your course schedule appropriately.

Students may elect to count one of the following 1000-level courses toward their major: ENGL 1111, 1210W, 1220W, 1230W, 1240, 1250W, 1260W, 1270W, 1280, 1290. 

  • ENGL 1100 Composition: For students who need to improve their writing. Emphasis on writing skills, with some analysis of modern nonfiction writing. [3] (No AXLE credit)
  • ENGL 1111 First Year Writing Seminar: Independent learning and inquiry in an environment in which students can express knowledge and defend opinions through intensive class discussion, oral presentations, and written expression. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication of topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits in any 1111 course per semester of enrollment. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)
  • ENGL 1210W Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Close study of short stories and novels and written explication of these forms. [3] (AXLE: 1000-level W course, HCA)
  • ENGL 1220W Drama: Forms and Techniques: Close study of representative plays of the major periods and of the main formal categories (tragedy, comedy) and written explication of these forms. [3] (AXLE: 1000-level W course, HCA)
  • ENGL 1230W Literature and Analytical Thinking: Close reading and writing in a variety of genres drawn from several periods. Productive dialogue, persuasive argument, and effective prose style. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (AXLE: 1000-level W course, HCA)
  • ENGL 1240 Beginning Nonfiction Workshop: Writing various forms of prose nonfiction. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 1250W Introduction to Poetry: Close study and criticism of poems. The nature of poetry, and the process of literary explication. [3] (AXLE: 1000-level W course, HCA)
  • ENGL 1260W Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Analysis of a range of texts in social, political, and aesthetic contexts. Interdisciplinary study of cultural forms as diverse as poetry, advertisement, and film. [3] (AXLE: 1000-level W course, HCA)
  • ENGL 1270W Introduction to Literary Criticism: Selected critical approaches to literature. [3] (AXLE: 1000-level W course, HCA)
  • ENGL 1280 Beginning Fiction Workshop: Introduction to the art of writing prose fiction. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 1290 Beginning Poetry Workshop: Introduction to the art of poetry writing. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2200 Foundation of Literary Study: Fundamentals of literary study: close reading; analytic writing; historical context; abstract reasoning in theory; creative expression. [3] (HCA). *2200 may count as an elective in any program. Please consult your adviser.
  • ENGL 2310 Representative British Writers (to 1660): Selections from British literature with attention to contexts and literary periods. From the beginnings to 1660. Provides a broad background for more specialized courses and is especially useful for students considering advanced studies in literature. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2311 Representative British Writers (from 1660): Selections from British literature with attention to contexts and literary periods. From 1660 to the present. Provides a broad background for more specialized courses and is especially useful for students considering advanced studies in literature. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2316 Representative American Writers: Selections from the entire body of American literature with attention to contexts and literary periods. Provides a broad background for more specialized courses and is especially useful for students considering advanced studies in literature. Repeat credit for students who have completed 2316W. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 2316W Representative American Writers: Selections from the entire body of American literature with attention to contexts and literary periods. Provides a broad background for more specialized courses and is especially useful for students considering advanced studies in literature. Repeat credit for students who have completed 2316. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 2318 World Literature, Classical: Great Books from the points of view of literary expression and changing ideologies: Classical Greece through the Renaissance. Repeat credit for students who have completed 2318W. [3] (HCA)
  • ENG: 2318W World Literature, Classical: Great Books from the points of view of literary expression and changing ideologies: Classical Greece through the Renaissance. Repeat credit for students who have completed 2318. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2319 World Literature, Modern: Great Books from the points of view of literary expression and changing ideologies: The 17th century to the contemporary period. Repeat credit for students who have completed 2319W. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2319W World Literature, Modern: Great Books from the points of view of literary expression and changing ideologies: The 17th century to the contemporary period. Repeat credit for students who have completed 2319. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2320 Southern Literature: The works of Southern writers from Captain Smith to the present. Topics such as the Plantation Myth, slavery and civil war, Agrarianism, and "post-southernism." Authors may include Poe, Twain, Cable, Faulkner, Welty, Percy, Wright. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2330 Introduction to Environmental Humanities: Interdisciplinary study of human beings' relationship to the environment. Literary, artistic, historical, and philosophical perspectives. Cultural understandings of the environment. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2330W Introduction to Environmental Humanities: Interdisciplinary study of human beings' relationship to the environment. Literary, artistic, historical, and philosophical perspectives. Cultural understandings of the environment. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2740 Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Literary, philosophical, and cultural texts on varied philosophical topics. May be repeated for credit if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course per semester. [3] (HCA)

 

For Creative Writing workshops, Pre-1800 and Diverse Perspective courses, please view their corresponding sections. 

  • ENGL 3215 The Art of Blogging: Conventions of the rapidly evolving literary form of blogging. Creation and maintenance of a personal blog. Critique of online journalism across many genres, including activism, politics, science, and arts and culture. Interaction with professional bloggers. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3215W The Art of Blogging: Conventions of the rapidly evolving literary form of blogging. Creation and maintenance of a personal blog. Critique of online journalism across many genres, including activism, politics, science, and arts and culture. Interaction with professional bloggers. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed 3215. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3240W Pop Science: The Art and Impact of Popular Science Writing: Mechanics and influence of popular science writing in the 21st century. Students will critique bestselling books and award-winning journalism; develop and publish their own blogs with a focus on science, technology, and the environment; and interact with top science writers, editors, and podcasters. Not open to students who have earned credit for CSET 3890 section 01 offered fall Fall 2019. [3] (SBS)
  • ENGL 3280 Literature and the Craft of Writing: The forms and techniques of creative writing. Contemporary practices in fiction and poetry in historical context. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3610 The Romantic Period: Prose and poetry of the Wordsworths, the Shelleys, Byron, Keats, and others. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3610W The Romantic Period: Prose and poetry of the Wordsworths, the Shelleys, Byron, Keats, and others. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3610W. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3611 The Romantic Period: Continuation of 3610. Prose and poetry of the Wordsworths, the Shelleys, Byron, Keats, and others. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3614 The Victorian Period: Works of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hardy, and others. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3614W The Victorian Period: Works of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hardy, and others. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3614. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3618 The Nighteenth Century English Novel: The study of selected novels of Dickens, Thackeray, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, George Meredith, Thomas Hardy, and other major novelists of the period. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3620 Nighteenth Century American Literature: Explorations of themes, forms, and social and cultural issues shaping the works of American writers. Authors may include Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Douglass, Jacobs, Stowe, Melville, Dickinson, Alcott, Whitman, and Twain. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3622 Nighteenth Century American Women Writers: Themes and forms of American women's prose and poetry, with the emphasis on alternative visions of the frontier, progress, class, race, and self-definition. Authors include Child, Kirkland, Fern, Jacobs, Harper, Dickinson, and Chopin. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3624W Literature of the American Civil War: Origins and impact of the war as depicted in short stories, novels, poems, and films. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Stephen Crane, Margaret Mitchell, William Faulkner, and Margaret Walker. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 3630 The Modern British Novel: The British novel from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Forster, and other novelists varying at the discretion of instructor. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3634 Modern Irish Literature: Major works from the Irish literary revival to the present, with special attention to the works of Yeats, Synge, Joyce, O'Casey, and Beckett. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3640 Modern British and American Poetry: Yeats to Auden: A course in the interpretation and criticism of selected modern masters of poetry, British and American, with the emphasis on poetry as an art. Poets selected may vary at discretion of instructor. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3642 Film and Modernism: Film in the context of the major themes of literary modernism: the divided self, language and realism, nihilism and belief, and spatialization of time. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3644 Twentieth Century American Novel: Explorations of themes, forms, and social cultural issues shaping the works of American novelists. Authors may include Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Hemingway, Hurston, Ellison, McCarthy, Bellow, Kingston, Morrison, Pynchon. Emphasizes writers before 1945. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3645 Twentieth Century American Novel: Explorations of themes, forms, and social cultural issues shaping the works of American novelists. Authors may include Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Hemingway, Hurston, Ellison, McCarthy, Bellow, Kingston, Morrison, Pynchon. Emphasizes writers after 1945. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3646 Poetry Since World War II: Poets studied vary at discretion of instructor. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3680 Twentieth Century Drama: Topics in twentieth century drama drawn from the American, British, and/or world traditions. Formal structures of dramatic literature studied within contexts of performance, theatrical production, and specific dramatic careers. Authors may include O'Neill, Albee, Hansberry, Hellman, Stoppard, Wilson, and Churchill. Emphasizes American drama. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 3681 Twentieth Century Drama: Topics in twentieth century drama drawn from the American, British, and/or world traditions. Formal structures of dramatic literature studied within contexts of performance, theatrical production, and specific dramatic careers. Authors may include O'Neill, Albee, Hansberry, Hellman, Stoppard, Wilson, and Churchill. Emphasizes British and world drama. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 3683 Contemporary British Literature: The novel, short story, and verse in Great Britain since World War II. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3692 Desire in America: Literature, Cinema and History: The influence of desire and repression in shaping American culture and character from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 3694 America on Film: Art and Ideology: American culture and character through film, film theory, and literature. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 3695 America on Film: Performance and Culture: Film performance in the construction of identity and gender, social meaning and narrative, public image and influence in America. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 3710 Literature and Intellectual History: Fiction, poetry, and prose writings that represent overarching themes in English and/or American literature across conventional historical periods in order to define and trace their genealogy and evolution. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3711 Literature and Intellectual History: The emergence of modern consciousness in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3711 Literature and Intellectual History: The emergence of modern consciousness in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3711. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3720 Literature, Science and Technology: The relationship of science and technology to literature, film, and popular media. Focus on such topics as digital technology, genetics, and the representation of science in particular periods, genres, movements, and critical theories. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3720W. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3720W Literature, Science and Technology:The relationship of science and technology to literature, film, and popular media. Focus on such topics as digital technology, genetics, and the representation of science in particular periods, genres, movements, and critical theories. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3720. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3726 New Media: History, theory, and design of digital media. Literature, video, film, online games, and other interactive narratives. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3726W New Media: History, theory, and design of digital media. Literature, video, film, online games, and other interactive narratives. Serves as repeat credit for 3726. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3728 Science Fiction: Social and historical developments within the genre. Works from the late nineteenth century to the present. Cultural issues, including race, gender, sexuality, violence, and the representation of science. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3728W. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3728W Science Fiction: Social and historical developments within the genre. Works from the late nineteenth century to the present. Cultural issues, including race, gender, sexuality, violence, and the representation of science. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3728. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3730 Literature and the Environment: Environmental issues from British, American, and global perspectives. Methodological approaches such as ecocriticism, environmental and social justice, ethics, and activism. The role of literature and the imagination in responding to ecological problems and shaping environmental values. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3734 Literature and Law: Study of the relationship between the discourses of law and literature. Focus on such topics as legal narratives, metaphor in the courts, representations of justice on the social stage. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3734W. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3734W Literature and Law: Study of the relationship between the discourses of law and literature. Focus on such topics as legal narratives, metaphor in the courts, representations of justice on the social stage. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3734. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3736 Words and Music: An investigation of works of literature that have inspired musical settings and the musical settings themselves. Emphasis on literary and musical analysis and interpretation. No musical background assumed. Repeat credit for students who have completed MUSL 2330. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3740 Critical Theory: Major theoretical approaches that have shaped critical discourse, the practices of reading, and the relation of literature and culture. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3742 Feminist Theory: An introduction to feminist theory. Topics include cross-cultural gender identities; the development of "masculinity" and "femininity"; racial, ethnic, class, and national differences; sexual orientations; the function of ideology; strategies of resistance; visual and textual representations; the nature of power. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3744 Advanced Poetry: Formal analysis and close reading of major poems in the extended canon of British and American poetry. Related examples of historical, theoretical, and applied criticism. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3746 Workshop in English and History: Team-taught by a historian and an interdisciplinary scholar. Explores intersection of disciplines through close examination of texts in historical context. Preference to students majoring in the English-History program. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (No AXLE credit)
  • ENGL 3748 Introduction to English Linguistics: Systematic study of present-day English sounds, words, sentences, and the contexts of language production. Contemporary varieties of English. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3890 Movements in Literature: Studies in intellectual currents that create a group or school of writers within a historical period. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3890W Movements in Literature: Studies in intellectual currents that create a group or school of writers within a historical period. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3891 Special Topics in Creative Writing: Advanced instruction in creative writing in emerging modes and hybrid genres. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3892 Problems in Literature: Studies in common themes, issues, or motifs across several historical periods. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3892W Problems in Literature: Studies in common themes, issues, or motifs across several historical periods. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3894 Major Figures in Literature: Studies in the works of one or two writers with attention to the development of a writer's individual canon, the biographical dimension of this work, and critical responses to it. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3894W Major Figures in Literature: Studies in the works of one or two writers with attention to the development of a writer's individual canon, the biographical dimension of this work, and critical responses to it. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3896 Special Topics in Investigative Writing in America: Course will be taught by a distinguished visiting journalist from a major U.S. newspaper or magazine. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 287] (No AXLE credit)
  • ENGL 3897 Special Topics in Critical Theory: Diverse range of literary, philosophical, cultural, and political texts. May be repeated for credit if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course per semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3898 Special Topics in English and American Literature: Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3898W Special Topics in English and American Literature: Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3899 Special Topics in Film: Theory and practice of cinema as an aesthetic and cultural form. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course per semester. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3899] (HCA)

 

  • ENGL 2310 Representative British Writers (to 1660): Selections from British literature with attention to contexts and literary periods. From the beginnings to 1660. Provides a broad background for more specialized courses and is especially useful for students considering advanced studies in literature. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 2318 World Literature, Classical: Great Books from the points of view of literary expression and changing ideologies: Classical Greece through the Renaissance. Repeat credit for students who have completed 2318W. [3] (HCA)
  • ENG: 2318W World Literature, Classical: Great Books from the points of view of literary expression and changing ideologies: Classical Greece through the Renaissance. Repeat credit for students who have completed 2318. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3310 Anglo-Saxon Language and Literature: The study of the Old English language. Selected historical and literary prose. Short heroic poems. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3312 The Medieval World: English literature and culture in relation to Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. Cross-cultural exchange, national and religious identity, and race. Not open to students who have completed ENGL 3316. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3312W The Medieval World: English literature and culture in relation to Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. Cross-cultural exchange, national and religious identity, and race. Not open to students who have completed ENGL 3316. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3312. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3314 Chaucer: Study of The Canterbury Tales and Chaucer's world. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3316 Medieval Literature: The drama, lyrics, romance, allegory, and satire of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, studied in the context of the period's intellectual climate and social change. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3318 The History of the English Language: The development of English syntax. History of the English vocabulary: word formation, borrowing, semantic change, and meter. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3330 Sixteenth Century: Prose and poetry of the sixteenth century. Emphasis on Spenser and his contemporaries. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3332 English Renaissance: Drama: English drama, exclusive of Shakespeare, from 1550-1642: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and others. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3332W English Renaissance: Drama: English drama, exclusive of Shakespeare, from 1550-1642: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and others. Serves as repeat credit for 3332. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3335 English Renaissance: Poetry: Development of the English poetic tradition from 1500-1700. Repeat credit for students who have earned credit for 3335W. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3335W English Renaissance: Poetry: Development of the English poetic tradition from 1500-1700. Repeat credit for students who have earned credit for 3335. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3336 Shakespeare: About twenty of the major plays considered in chronological order over two terms, with emphasis on Shakespeare's development as a dramatic artist. Primarily comedies and histories. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3336W Shakespeare: Comedies and Histories: About twenty of the major plays considered in chronological order over two terms, with emphasis on Shakespeare's development as a dramatic artist. Primarily comedies and histories. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3336. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3337 Shakespeare: About twenty of the major plays considered in chronological order over two terms, with emphasis on Shakespeare's development as a dramatic artist. Primarily tragedies and romances. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3337W Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romaces: About twenty of the major plays considered in chronological order over two terms, with emphasis on Shakespeare's development as a dramatic artist. Primarily tragedies and romances. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3337. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3340 Shakespeare: Representative Selections: A representative selection of plays, including histories, tragedies, comedies, and romances, designed to give the student a sense of the full range of Shakespeare's work in one semester. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3340W. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3340W Shakespeare: Representative Selections: A representative selection of plays, including histories, tragedies, comedies, and romances, designed to give the student a sense of the full range of Shakespeare's work in one semester. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3340. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3346 Seventeenth Century Literature: Poetry and prose from 1600 to the English Civil War, such as Metaphysical and Cavalier poetry, essays, romances, and satires. Authors may include Bacon, Cavendish, Donne, Herbert, Jonson, Lanier, Marvell, and Wroth. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3348 Milton: The early English poems; Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes; the major prose. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3348W Milton: The early English poems; Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes; the major prose. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3348. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3360 Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Explorations of the aesthetic and social world of letters from the English Civil War to the French Revolution. Drama, poetry, and prose, including Restoration plays, political poetry, satire, travel narratives, and tales. Authors may include Behn, Dryden, Congreve, Addison, Swift, Finch, Pope, Fielding, Burney, Johnson, and Inchbald. Earlier writers. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3361 Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Explorations of the aesthetic and social world of letters from the English Civil War to the French Revolution. Drama, poetry, and prose, including Restoration plays, political poetry, satire, travel narratives, and tales. Authors may include Behn, Dryden, Congreve, Addison, Swift, Finch, Pope, Fielding, Burney, Johnson, and Inchbald. Later writers. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3364 The Eighteenth Century English Novel: The English novel from its beginning through Jane Austen. Development of the novel as a literary form, and study of selected works of Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, and other novelists of the period. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3370 The Bible in Literature: An examination of ways in which the Bible and biblical imagery have functioned in literature and fine arts, in both "high culture" and popular culture, from Old English poems to modern poetry, drama, fiction, cartoons, and political rhetoric. Readings include influential biblical texts and a broad selection of literary texts drawn from all genres and periods of English literature. [3] (HCA)

Other 3000-level English electives may also fulfill the Diverse Perspectives Requirement based on the instructor's syllabus for that course. If so, this will be indicated in the course schedule. Additionally, courses from other departments may also fulfill the Diverse Perspectives Requirement per approval by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. 

  • ENGL 3650 Ethnic American Literature: Texts and theory relevant to understanding race, culture, and ethnicity in the formation of American culture. Literature from at least three of the following groups: African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Chicano/Latino Americans, Caribbean Americans, and European Americans. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3650W Ethnic American Literature: Texts and theory relevant to understanding race, culture, and ethnicity in the formation of American culture. Literature from at least three of the following groups: African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Chicano/Latino Americans, Caribbean Americans, and European Americans. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3654 African American Literature: Examination of the literature produced by African Americans. May include literary movements, vernacular traditions, social discourses, material culture, and critical theories. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3654W. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 3654W African American Literature: Examination of the literature produced by African Americans. May include literary movements, vernacular traditions, social discourses, material culture, and critical theories. Repeat credit for students who have completed 3654. [3] (US)
  • ENGL 3658 Latino-American Literature: Texts and theory relevant to understanding constructs of Latino identity, including race, class, gender, and basis for immigration, in the context of American culture. The course focuses on the examination of literature by Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and Latin American writers in the United States. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3658W Latino-American Literature: Texts and theory relevant to understanding constructs of Latino identity, including race, class, gender, and basis for immigration, in the context of American culture. The course focuses on the examination of literature by Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and Latin American writers in the United States. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3658. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3662 Asian American Literature: Diversity of Asian American literary production with specific attention to works after 1965. Topics such as gender and sexuality, memory and desire, and diaspora and panethnicity in the context of aesthetics and politics of Asian American experience. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3662W Asian American Literature: Diversity of Asian American literary production with specific attention to works after 1965. Topics such as gender and sexuality, memory and desire, and diaspora and panethnicity in the context of aesthetics and politics of Asian American experience. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3664 Jewish American Literature: Nineteenth century to the present. Issues of race, gender, ethnicity, immigration, and diaspora. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3670 Colonial and Post-Colonial Literature: Literature exploring European colonialism and its aftermath from the eighteenth century to the present: language, gender, and agency in the colonial encounter; anti-colonial resistance movements; and postcolonial cultures. Topics may vary; course may be taken more than once with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3670W Colonial and Post-Colonial Literature: Literature exploring European colonialism and its aftermath from the eighteenth century to the present: language, gender, and agency in the colonial encounter; anti-colonial resistance movements; and postcolonial cultures. Topics may vary; course may be taken more than once with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3674 Caribbean Literature: Caribbean literature from 1902 to the present. Emphasis on writing since 1952, which marks the beginning of West Indian nationalism and the rise of the West Indian novel. [3] (INT)
  • ENGL 3678 Anglophone African Literature: From the Sundiata Epic to the present with emphasis on the novel. Attention to issues of identity, post coloniality, nationalism, race, and ethnicity in both SubSaharan and Mahgrib literatures. Such authors as Achebe, Ngugi, Gordimer, Awoonor, and El Saadaw. [3] (INT)
  • ENGL 3678W Anglophone African Literature: From the Sundiata Epic to the present with emphasis on the novel. Attention to issues of identity, post coloniality, nationalism, race, and ethnicity in both SubSaharan and Mahgrib literatures. Such authors as Achebe, Ngugi, Gordimer, Awoonor, and El Saadaw. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3678. [3] (INT)
  • ENGL 3742 Feminist Theory: An introduction to feminist theory. Topics include cross-cultural gender identities; the development of "masculinity" and "femininity"; racial, ethnic, class, and national differences; sexual orientations; the function of ideology; strategies of resistance; visual and textual representations; the nature of power. [3] (P)
  • ENGL 3742W Feminist Theory: An introduction to feminist theory. Topics include cross-cultural gender identities; the development of "masculinity" and "femininity"; racial, ethnic, class, and national differences; sexual orientations; the function of ideology; strategies of resistance; visual and textual representations; the nature of power. Serves as repeat credit for ENGL 3742. [3] (P)

 

Admission to these courses is by consent of the instructor.

  • ENGL 3210 Intermediate Nonfiction Writing: Instruction in the forms and techniques of nonfiction writing. Admission by consent of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. [3] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3220 Advanced Nonfiction Writing: Further instruction in the form and techniques of nonfiction writing. Admission by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course per semester. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3220] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3230 Intermediate Fiction Workshop: Instruction in fiction writing. Supplementary readings that illustrate traditional aspects of prose fiction. Admission by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course per semester. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3230] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3240 Advanced Fiction Workshop: Continuing instruction in fiction writing. Admission by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course per semester. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3240] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3250 Intermediate Poetry Workshop: Instruction in poetry writing. Supplementary readings illustrating traditional aspects of poetry. Admission by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course per semester. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3250] (HCA)
  • ENGL 3260 Advanced Poetry Workshop: Continuing instruction in poetry writing. Admission by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course per semester. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ENGL 3260] (HCA)

 

  • ENGL 4998 Honors Colloquium: Background for writing the honors thesis. Emphasis on research methods, critical approaches, and the students' own projects. Limited to seniors admitted to the English Honors Program. [3] (No AXLE credit)
  • ENGL 4999: Honors Thesis: Prerequisite: 4998. [3] (No AXLE credit)
  • Honors Seminars: The Department of English offers two Honors seminars each semester (3000-level course with a pre-requisite of 3.4 GPA). 

ENGL 3851 & 3852 Independent Study

Independent study and directed study courses are primarily intended for majors in their junior and senior years. Exceptions may be made for well-qualified sophomores. To enroll in an independent study course, please complete the following steps:

  1. Obtain permission to enroll from the instructor of your choice and Director of Undergraduate Studies prior to the opening of your enrollment window for the semester in which you wish to complete the independent study course.
  2. Complete the Contract for Registration in Independent Study Course. The form requires details regarding the nature of the project and the amount of credit to be earned. It must be signed by your instructor and the DUS or Department Chair prior to the tenth day of classes. 
  3. Submit your contract for Independent study to Inge Klaps before the end of the change period (the first week of classes). You will then be manually registered in YES.

This elective may be repeated for a total of 6 credits in 3851 and 3852 combined if there is no duplication in topic. Students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. (No AXLE credit)

Course Requirements for Majors and Minors

students sitting in rows of desks during an English faculty reading

Note: for full degree requirements, see the Major and Minor page.

Required Courses

  • Depending on the program, the English major or minor requires 3-6 credit hours in pre-1800 literature and 3-6 credit hours in diverse perspectives. See the current semester’s course offerings, above, or the list of electives, below, for specific course options.
  • Creative Writing majors must complete 12 credit hours of 3000-level creative writing workshops in at least two different genres (nonfiction, fiction, and/or poetry). Admission to these courses is by consent of the instructor. These elective workshops are listed in the Creative Writing Requirement section below. 

Electives

When choosing electives for the major, please keep in mind:

  • Students may elect to count one 1000-level course toward their major or minor: ENGL 1111, 1210W, 1220W, 1230W, 1240, 1250W, 1260W, 1270W, 1280, or 1290.
  • Survey courses (2310, 2311, and 2316(W)) are recommended for sophomores, to provide background for more advanced courses.
  • All courses numbered 2050 and above (except English 4999) count toward the English major.
  • English 3890(W), 3892(W), 3894(W), and 3898 may be repeated for credit when the topics are different.

AXLE in the English Department

Almost all College of Arts and Science students take at least one English course to help fulfill the requirements of AXLE, the college’s core curriculum. The English department offers courses to meet both the Writing and Liberal Arts requirements. Courses that meet AXLE requirements are clearly marked in the course lists above, in the undergraduate catalog, and in YES.

Note: for full AXLE requirements, see the College of Arts and Science guide to AXLE.

Meeting the Writing Requirement

The Department of English is unique in offering courses to satisfy all four components of the AXLE Writing Requirement. These include: 

  • English Composition (ENGL 1100)
  • First-Year Writing Seminar (ENGL 1111)
  • One additional W course
  • One 1000-level or 2000-level English course, or another W course of any level

The Liberal Arts Requirement

The department also offers courses in five of the categories included in the AXLE Liberal Arts Requirement: Humanities and the Creative Arts (HCA), Perspectives (P), History and Culture of the United States (US), International Cultures (INT), and Social and Behavioral Sciences (SBS). You can locate these electives in the course lists above, in the undergraduate catalog, or in YES using their corresponding codes.