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Graduate School Courses (PDF) - Anthropology courses page 78

ANTH 5106. Culture and Power in Latin America. (Also listed as ANTH 2106) Survey of native cultures and Spanish and Portuguese heritage. Fundamental traditions, including marriage and the family, the relationship between men and women, racial and ethnic identity, social class, and religion. Peasant communities and contemporary urban life. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2106. [3]

ANTH 5108. Indigenous Peoples of Lowland South America. (Also listed as ANTH 2108) Native societies of Amazonia, the Orinoco basin, and other forest, savanna, and coastal regions of South America. Ecology, cosmology, social organization, and political relations in historical and contemporary populations. Government policies, human rights, environmentalism, sustainable development, and indigenous activism and advocacy. [3]

ANTH 5109. Food Politics in America. (Also listed as ANTH 2109) The cultural, social, political, and economic contexts of the contemporary food system. Issues of health and nutrition. Land use, ecological relations, food chains, and links to climate change. Ethics of food production, distribution, and consumption. Agricultural policy, immigration, work conditions, animal welfare, and local economies. Roles of citizens and consumers. Rise of movements seeking sustainable alternatives. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2109. [3]

ANTH 5110. Gender and Cultural Politics. (Also listed as ANTH 2110) Cross-cultural comparison of women’s roles and status in western and non-Western societies. Role of myths, symbols, and rituals in the formation of gender identities and the politics of sexual cooperation, conflict, and inequality. Case studies from Africa, the Middle East, Europe, North and South America, Asia, and Melanesia. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2110. [3]

ANTH 5112. Psychological Anthropology. (Also listed as ANTH 2112) How personality and culture affect each other. Socialization and the life cycle, the definition of sex roles, individual psychology and group aggression, religion and group personality, and the nature of mental illness and normalcy in non-Western societies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2112. [3]

ANTH 5130. Global Infrastructure and Everyday Life. Relations between infrastructure and society around the world, past and present. Analysis of large technical systems as sites of cultural meaning, political struggle, and everyday social interaction. Water, energy, communication, and transportation networks in Africa, Asia, and the Americas, with an emphasis on Latin America. [3]

ANTH 5211. Archaeology. (Also listed as ANTH 2211) An introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to study the nature and development of prehistoric societies. Approaches to survey, excavation, analysis, and interpretation are explored through lectures, case studies, and problem assignments. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2211. [3]

ANTH 5220. Anthropological Approaches to Human Landscapes. (Also listed as ANTH 2220) Anthropological approaches to sociocultural processes and human-environment interactions in the formation of landscapes and settlement systems. Relationship of archaeology and cultural anthropology in the understanding of social space, sacred landscapes, urban plans, and historical ecology. Cross-cultural comparisons. Methods of interpretation and quantification. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2220/2220W. [3]

ANTH 5221. Old World Archaeology. (Also listed as ANTH 2221) Ancient Cultures of the Old World. Archaeology of the Near East, Africa, Asia, and Oceania. The origins of the great civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia. The beginnings of cities, agriculture, trade, and empires in light of recent archaeological discoveries. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2221. [3]

ANTH 5223. Native North Americans. (Also listed as ANTH 2223) Indian societies of North America; their archaeological origins, development, and changing adaptation to white society. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2223. [3] ANTH 5230. South American Archaeology. (Also listed as ANTH 2230) From 12,000 years ago to the present. Archaeology, ethnohistory, and ethnography. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2230. [3]

ANTH 5231. Ancient Andean Civilizations. (Also listed as ANTH 2231) Introduction to the archaeology and peoples of ancient South America. Early hunters and gatherers, origins of agriculture and urbanism, and the rise and fall of the Huari and Inca empires. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2231. [3]

ANTH 5342. Biology of Inequality. (Also listed as ANTH 2342) Biological and health consequences of racial and social inequalities. Psychosocial stress and measurement of its health impact. Effects on disease and precursors to disease. Measures of molecular biology, such as epigenetics and gene expression. Biomarkers of inflammation, cardiometabolic health, and immune function. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2342. [3]

ANTH 5370. Death and the Body. (Also listed as ANTH 2370) Crosscultural study of death rituals. Mortuary archaeology and anthropology of death and the body. Biological and social perspectives on the corpse and living body, and their treatment in ritual and everyday life. The body as biological specimen and social artifact. Nature of beauty, body modification, and adornment. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2370. [3]

ANTH 5601. Introduction to Linguistics. (Also listed as ANTH 2601) Systematic study and analysis of human language. Formation of language sounds, sound systems, the structure of words, the structure of sentences, meaning, language change. Data from diverse languages of the world. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2601. [3]

ANTH 5602. Anthropological Linguistics. (Also listed as ANTH 2602) An introduction to the study of language in its anthropological context. Language and culture, the structure of symbolic systems, vocabulary as a guide to the ways societies classify their universe. Linguistic analysis as a tool for ethno-graphic investigation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2602. [3]

ANTH 5603. Comparative Writing Systems. (Also listed as ANTH 2603) The origins, development, and social uses of writing in the ancient Middle East, Mediterranean, and Mesoamerica. Decipherments of hieroglyphic systems. Literacy, historiography, and cross-cultural translation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2603. [3]

ANTH 5604. Introduction to Language Contact. (Also listed as ANTH 2604) Structural, social, and cultural issues involved in protracted contact between speakers of different languages. Bilingualism and multilingualism, lexical and structural borrowing, nativization, code switching, and Pidgins and Creoles. Linguistic psychosocial theories regarding common contact patterns. The sociocultural meaning of language contact in different societies. Case studies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2604. [3]

ANTH 5612. Introduction to a Maya Language. (Also listed as ANTH 2612) Beginning instruction in Kaqchikel, K’iche’, or Q’eqchi’. Basic speaking, reading, and writing skills. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2612. [3]

ANTH 5614. Conversational K’iche’ Maya. (Also listed as ANTH 2614) Intermediate level course with advanced grammar. Counterfactual constructions, deixis, verbal derivations of positional roots, sound symbolic verbs, and verbal nominalizations. Vocabulary and idioms. Various literary genres. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2614. [3]

ANTH 5866. Archaeological Excavation. (Also listed as ANTH 3866) Excavation techniques and field recording methods through participation in an archaeological dig. Excavation unit layout, digging techniques, feature and artifact identification. Mapping and field instrumentation. Data registry, statistical analysis, artifact curation, and conservation. Stratigraphy, relative and absolute dating, sampling strategies and techniques, data management. Research design and archaeological ethics. [4]

ANTH 6120. Sociocultural Field Methods. (Also listed as ANTH 3120) Research design and proposal writing, access to data, ethical issues, sampling techniques, interviewing questionnaire design and question writing, data analysis. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3120. [3]

ANTH 6121. Global Wealth and Poverty. (Also listed as ANTH 3121) The production of inequality. How wealth is accumulated, lost, exchanged, and displayed; how poverty is created, endured, and overcome. Explanations in terms of luck, hard work, immorality, occult forces, and public policies. Case studies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3121. [3]

ANTH 6122. The Anthropology of Globalization. (Also listed as ANTH 3122) Perspectives on globalization based on ethnographic case studies. The impact of new technologies on native cultures; different cultural meanings of global commodities; creation of new diaspora cultures; effects of neoliberal reforms on local economies; ethnic movements and terror networks. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3122. [3]

ANTH 6123. Maya Culture and Ethnography. (Also listed as ANTH 3123) Survey of the different cultural groups of the Maya peoples of Mexico and Guatemala. Comparison of cultural features and social and political history. Relationship of culture and language. Introduction to the Maya language family with a focus on Tzotzil. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3123. [3]

ANTH 6125. Public Scholarship Practicum in Community Research. Theory and methods for publicizing research to policy makers, organizations, and the public. Uses of media. Communicating research in civil rights; environmentalism; and advocacy on gender, sexuality, health, and religion. Translating original scholarship into pieces for newspapers, blogs, websites, video resources, and public presentations. Prior research experience is expected. Consent of instructor is required. [3]

ANTH 6130. Andean Culture and Society. (Also listed as ANTH 3130) Historical and archaeological background, languages, economy, environment, and cultural adaptation of Andean peoples. Spanish and native American heritage. Religion, family structure, political organization, contemporary social issues, and economic background. Urban and rural traditions, social movements, and change. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3130. [3]

ANTH 6132. Social Movements. (Also listed as ANTH 3132) Collective action, past and present. Class- and identity-based movements, transnational activism, and networks. The early U.S. labor movement; 1960s gay, women’s and civil rights movements. Global struggles for social justice. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3132. [3]

ANTH 6133. Political Anthropology. (Also listed as ANTH 3133) Comparative and ethnographic analysis of political and legal systems. Formal and informal means of control in egalitarian and hierarchical societies. Anthropological theories of power, authority, influence, and leadership. Social and cultural dimensions of conflict, consensus, competition, and dispute resolution. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3133. [3]

ANTH 6135. Development, Social Enterprise, Social Justice. Theories of economic and human development. Multidimensional approaches to poverty and well-being. Roles of inequality, discrimination, and social justice. Practical focus on social entrepreneurship in international context. [3]

ANTH 6140. Myth, Ritual, Belief: The Anthropology of Religion. (Also listed as ANTH 3140) Cross-cultural survey of religious and ritual beliefs in light of theories of religion. Topics include sacrifice, myth, witchcraft, divination, religious change, and millenarian movements. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3140. [3]

ANTH 6141. Anthropology of Healing. (Also listed as ANTH 3141) Ritual, symbols, belief, and emotion in health, illness, and therapeutic processes. Practices and politics of healing in western and non-western societies, including shamanism, faith healing, ecstatic religious experience, alternative medicine, and biomedicine. Mind-body interactions, medical pluralism, relations between patients and healers, and implications for improving medical care. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3141. [3]

ANTH 6142. Medicine, Culture, and the Body. (Also listed as ANTH 3142) Concepts of the human body from historical and cross-cultural perspectives. Exploration of experiences, representations, and medical theories of the body in birth, death, health, and illness in Western and non-Western societies. Comparison of methodologies of anthropology and history. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3142 or HIST 2830 or 5830. [3]

ANTH 6143. Medical Anthropology. (Also listed as ANTH 3143) Biocultural aspects of human adaptations to health, disease, and nutrition. Non-Western medical and psychiatric systems. Effects of cultures on the interpretation, diagnosis, and treatment of illness. Case studies from Africa, Oceania, Latin America, and the contemporary United States. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3143. [3]

ANTH 6150. Cognitive Anthropology. (Also listed as ANTH 3150) A survey of methods and approaches in linguistics and the cognitive sciences. Exploration of culture and thought; how culture affects our ways of reasoning. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3150. [3]

ANTH 6152. Activism and Social Change: Theory, Experience, and Practice. (Also listed as ANTH 4152) Introduction to theory and ethics of social activism and advocacy. Roles of academics and scholars. Theories of political organizing and mobilization. Application of anthropological research methods. Case studies in local, national, and global social issues, processes of civic mobilization, and social change. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4152. [3]

ANTH 6153. Economic Anthropology. (Also listed as ANTH 4153) Modern and postmodern cultural organization of Western and non-Western economies. Crosscultural comparison of concepts of self-interest and rationality. Relation of the growth of post-industrial (service and information) economies to economic strategies of ethnic groups. Survey of indigenous alternatives to development. Theoretical issues grounded in case studies from our own and other cultures. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4153. [3]

ANTH 6154. Environmental Anthropology. (Also listed as ANTH 4154) The relationship between human beings and the environments that sustain them. Global diversity of human ecological adaptations. Hunter-gatherers, pastoral nomads, slash-and-burn agriculturalists, and irrigation agriculturalists. Human impact on the environment. Theories of human ecological interaction. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4154. [3]

ANTH 6160. Anthropologies and Archaeologies of Community. (Also listed as ANTH 3160) Creation, maintenance, and transformation of communities through time. Community as a village or settlement, and as an “imagined” or virtual aspect of social identity. Behaviorist, interactionist, discursive, and identity-oriented anthropological approaches to community. Community organization and the built environment. Ancient and modern case studies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3160. [3]

ANTH 6161. Colonial Encounters in the Americas. (Also listed as ANTH 3161) Theoretical discussion of colonialism as a sociocultural process. Comparative colonialism in pre- and post-Hispanic contexts. Methodological consideration of archaeological and archival analyses and their complementary epistemological statuses. Pan-American case studies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3161. [3]

ANTH 6200. Ancient Cities. (Also listed as ANTH 3200) Comparative examination of early cities in the Old World and pre-Columbian America. Analysis of social and economic processes supporting preindustrial urbanism. Role of geography, ideology, trade, and settlement systems in the rise of early urban societies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3200. [3]

ANTH 6202. The Collapse of Civilizations. (Also listed as ANTH 3202) Causes of the decline or collapse of complex societies. Old World and New World examples. Historical, anthropological, and paleoecological theories and controversies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3202. [3]

ANTH 6240. Ancient Mesoamerican Civilizations. (Also listed as ANTH 3240) Development of pre-Hispanic civilization in Mesoamerica from the beginnings of village life to the rise of the great states and empires: Olmec, Maya, Toltec, and Aztec civilizations. No credit for students who have earned credit for 6240. [3]

ANTH 6241. The Aztecs. (Also listed as ANTH 3241) Origins of the Aztec peoples of central Mexico and their culture; history and structure of the Aztec empire; pre-Columbian social, political, and economic organization; warfare and religion; the Spanish conquest; colonial society in central Mexico; ethno-graphic study of modern descendants of the Aztecs. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3241. [3]

ANTH 6242. The Archaeology of the Ancient Maya Civilization. Archaeological evidence and social theory on the enigmatic origins, complex nature, and sudden collapse of the ancient Maya civilization. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Open to advanced undergraduates with consent of the instructor. [3]

ANTH 6243. Classic Maya Religion and Politics. (Also listed as ANTH 3243) Anthropology of politics and religion in Classic Maya culture, A.D. 100-1000. Interpretation of Classic Maya iconography and epigraphy. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3243. [3]

ANTH 6250. The Inca Empire. (Also listed as ANTH 3250) The rise and fall of the Inca state in the Southern American Andes. Inca society, agriculture, economy, warfare, ancestor worship, mummies, and royal wealth. Imperial expansion, the role of the feasting in Inca politics, and place of ecology in Inca religion. Destruction of the empire during the Spanish conquest; persistence of pre-Columbian culture among Inca descendants in Peru and Bolivia. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3250. [3]

ANTH 6260. Ceramic Analysis in Archaeology. (Also listed as ANTH 3260) Ceramic sherds and vessels from ancient societies. Documentation of form, fabric, and decoration through illustrations. Qualitative and quantitative analysis. Integration with archaeological contexts for ceramic sequences and chronology. Technology, production, exchange, and consumption. Function and style. Emphasis on hands-on experience. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3260. [3]

ANTH 6261. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing. (Also listed as ANTH 3261) Computerized graphics and statistical procedures to recognize and analyze spatial patterning. Spatial data-collection, storage and retrieval; spatial analysis and graphic output of map features. Integration of satellite imagery with data from other sources through hands-on experience. Assumes basic knowledge of computer hardware and software. [3]

ANTH 6262. Ethics in Anthropology, Archaeology, and Development. (Also listed as ANTH 3262) Ethical perspectives on contemporary problems of archaeological and anthropological research, interaction, and interpretation of past and present non-Western societies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3262. [3]

ANTH 6343. Biology and Culture of Race. (Also listed as ANTH 3343) Biological and cultural perspectives on race in the United States and internationally. Patterns of human genetic variation. Biomedical use of racial categories. Social and cultural construction of race. Racism and racial discrimination. Racial disparities in health. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3343. [3]

ANTH 6344. Genetic Anthropology Lab Techniques. (Also listed as ANTH 3344) Applications of molecular anthropology techniques. DNA data analysis. Genetic methods and findings. DNA comparisons between world populations. Studies of ancient DNA. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3344. [3]

ANTH 6345. Human Evolutionary Genetics. (Also listed as ANTH 4345) Core issues in human evolution and population genetics. Molecular evidence for the origin of modern humans, reconstruction of human migrations, race, and detection of admixture between populations. Implications for human disease. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who earned credit for 294 section 1 in fall 2012. Prerequisite or corequisite: BSCI 1100, BSCI 1105, or BSCI 1510. [3]

ANTH 6371. Social and Health Consequences of Pandemics. (Also listed as ANTH 3371) Origins, spread, mortality, and the biological and social consequences. The epidemic of bubonic plague in the 1300s, known as the European Black Death. The devastation of indigenous New World populations by European diseases after 1492. Social and medical responses. Implications for modern societies. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3371. [3]

ANTH 6372. Human Osteology. (Also listed as ANTH 3372) Anatomy of the human skeleton. Determination of age, sex, stature, and biological affinity from bones and dentition. Analysis of archaeological skeletal remains for diagnosis of disease and identification of cultural practices. Use of human remains in criminal investigation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3372. [3]

ANTH 6373. Health and Disease in Ancient Populations. (Also listed as ANTH 4373) Paleopathology of mummies and skeletons. Skeletal evidence for violence and warfare. Gender and social status differences in diet, disease, and activity patterns to reconstruct ancient social organization. Biological relationships among ancient and modern populations. Ethics and federal law in the study of human remains. Laboratory analysis of skeletons. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4373. [3]

ANTH 6614. Advanced K’iche’ Maya. (Also listed as ANTH 3614) Vocabulary, listening, and speaking skills. Modern and colonial texts. Cultural context of linguistic practices in K’iche’ communities. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3614. [3] ANTH 6615. Readings in K’iche’ Mayan. (Also listed as ANTH 3615) Taught in K’iche’. Advanced vocabulary, grammar, syntax, reading, and writing. Colonial and modern texts. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3615. [3]

ANTH 6620. Maya Language and Literature. (Also listed as ANTH 3620) Introduction to a contemporary Maya language. Linguistic analysis and cultural concepts. By permission of instructor. May be repeated for the study of different Maya languages for a total of 6 credits. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3620. [1-6; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of ANTH 6620]

ANTH 6622. Classic Maya Language and Hieroglyphs. (Also listed as ANTH 3622) Linguistic analysis of Classic Maya Hieroglyphs from A.D. 100- 1000. Methods of decipherment, reading, and interpreting an ancient script. Role of socio-economic status in literacy. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3622. [3]

ANTH 6850. Independent Research. (Also listed as ANTH 3850) Readings on selected topics (of the student’s choice) and the preparation of reports. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3850. [1-3]

ANTH 6851. Independent Research. (Also listed as ANTH 3851) Readings on selected topics (of the student’s choice) and the preparation of reports. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3851. [1-3]

ANTH 6865. Field Research. (Also listed as ANTH 3865) Directed field research on topics of the student’s choice. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 6 credits per semester of enrollment. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3865. [1-6]

ANTH 6880. Internship Readings and Research. (Also listed as ANTH 3880) Readings and research conducted under the supervision of a member of the Anthropology department and a substantial research paper are required. Students from any discipline can gain experience working with a local, national, or international organization in developing a project to broaden their understanding of anthropological issues. Hours for background readings and research will be completed in ANTH 6880 concurrently with and regardless of the numbers of hours taken in internship training in 6881. Normally a 2.90 grade point average, 6 hours of prior work in ANTH, and prior approval of the student’s plan by the director of undergraduate studies in Anthropology are required. A research paper and report must be submitted at the end of the semester during which the internship training is completed. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3880. [Variable credit: 1-6]

ANTH 6881. Internship Training. (Also listed as ANTH 3881) Offered on a Pass/Fail basis only and must be taken concurrently with 6880. Hours of 6881 will not count toward the Anthropology major or minor. Students from any discipline can gain experience working with a local, national, or international organization in developing a project to broaden their understanding of anthropological issues. Hours for background readings and research will be completed in ANTH 6880 concurrently with and regardless of the numbers of hours taken in internship training in 6881. Normally a 2.90 grade point average, 6 hours of prior work in ANTH, and prior approval of the student’s plan by the director of undergraduate studies in Anthropology are required. A research paper and report must be submitted at the end of the semester during which the internship training is completed. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3881. [Variable credit: 1-9]

ANTH 6890. Special Topics. (Also listed as ANTH 3890) Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3890. [3]

ANTH 6900. Theories of Culture and Human Nature. (Also listed as ANTH 3900) Survey of the views of anthropological thinkers, from the late nineteenth century to the present, about the basic attributes of humankind and human culture. Comparison of different ideas of how people create culture and in turn are molded by culture. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3900. [3]

ANTH 6901. Problems in Anthropological Theory. (Also listed as ANTH 3901) An advanced seminar in anthropological theory: cultural evolution, cultural history, ethnic relations, cultural ecology, archaeological method and theory, social structure, political organizations, religious institutions. [3]

ANTH 7150. Urban Ecology. Environmental contexts and consequences of human and non-human life processes in cities through history. Transformations of landscapes, food systems, and built environments. Origins of cities, urbanization, industrial archaeology, urban planning, and environmental racism. Long-term perspectives on climate change, political ecology, environmental history, green politics, and prospects for sustainability. [3]

ANTH 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly ANTH 369] [0-12] ANTH 8000. History of Anthropological Theory I. [Formerly ANTH 314] An advanced consideration of the history of anthropological theory from its origins to the mid-twentieth century. [3] ANTH 8001. History of Anthropological Theory II. [Formerly ANTH 315] An advanced consideration of the history of anthropological theory from the mid-twentieth century to the present. [3]

ANTH 8010. Special Topics. [Formerly ANTH 367] Problems, themes, or issues in anthropological theory and methods. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3]

ANTH 8100. Political Violence. [Formerly ANTH 318] Comparative and ethnographic analysis of state violence, guerrilla insurgencies, paramilitarism and vigilantism; consequences of repression, impunity, and social fragmentation on historical memory and democratic processes. [3]

ANTH 8104. Seminar on Political Economy and Anthropology. [Formerly ANTH 323] Anthropological approaches to political economy and globalization. Fundamental works in political economy and economic anthropology. [3]

ANTH 8106. Ethics in Anthropology. [Formerly ANTH 345] Ethical obligations of anthropologists in dealing with human subjects on the interpretation, interaction, and action with non-western societies. Ethics from Socrates to radical postmodernism. Debate of specific issues presented by non-Western practices, cultural property rights, sites versus sacred places, repatriation, cultural relativism, and anthropological activism. [3]

ANTH 8107. Race as a Cultural and Legal Construct. [Formerly ANTH 333] Historical and contemporary roles of race and racism in settler colonialism, slavery, the nation-state, and empire. Theoretical perspectives from social constructionism, anti-colonial literature, critical race theory, and standpoint theory. [3]

ANTH 8110. Seminar in Maya Ethnography. [Formerly ANTH 303] Ethnographic survey of the Maya of Mexico and Guatemala; historical and current data, methods, theories. [3]

ANTH 8200. Archaeological Method and Theory. [Formerly ANTH 310] Development of archaeology as a discipline; relationships with anthropology and history; intellectual trends. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. [3]

ANTH 8201. Advanced Spatial Analysis. [Formerly ANTH 312] Theoretical and methodological training for advanced GIS applications in social science research. Implementing GIS in research design, field spatial data acquisition methods, data processing, management, visualization, and analysis. [3]

ANTH 8210. Preindustrial Political Systems. [Formerly ANTH 331] History, structure, and change of pre-modern political systems around the world. [3]

ANTH 8211. Space, Place, and Landscape. [Formerly ANTH 335] Crossdisciplinary approaches to the significance of space and landscape for human societies in the past and present. [3]

ANTH 8212. Historical Archaeology. [Formerly ANTH 340] Development, practice, methods, and theoretical perspectives in historical archaeology; relationships between archaeology and history. [3]

ANTH 8220. The Historical Archaeology of Latin America. [Formerly ANTH 349] The study of archaeological, historic, and ethnohistorical materials in examining the conquest, colonization, and process of culture change in Latin America. [3]

ANTH 8230. The Collapse of Civilizations: General Theories and the Maya Collapse. [Formerly ANTH 325] An advanced consideration of the causes and processes involved in the decline of complex societies. General theory is then illustrated by detailed interactive study of the evidence and interpretations of the collapse of the civilization of the Classic Maya, arguably the New World’s most advanced society. A seminar allowing each student to develop and define their own perspective on this major problem in archaeology and social theory. [3]

ANTH 8232. Seminar in Mesoamerican Archaeology. [Formerly ANTH 350] The prehistory of pre-Columbian civilizations of Mexico and Central America. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]

ANTH 8240. Seminar in South American Archaeology and Ethnohistory. [Formerly ANTH 360] The prehistory of pre-Columbian civilizations of the Andean and lowland regions of South America. [3]

ANTH 8300. Human Variation and Osteology. [Formerly ANTH 307] Survey of physical and genetic variation in modern human populations. Laboratory techniques in osteological analysis. [3]

ANTH 8301. Bioarchaeology Theory and Methods. The body as a form of material culture. Traumatic violence, structural violence, and community health profiles. Sex and gender in the bioarchaeological record. Skeletal analysis; paleopathology; stable isotope analysis; ancient DNA; radiocarbon dating. Knowledge of skeletal anatomy is encouraged. No credit for students who have earned credit for 8010 section 02 in fall 2015. [3]

ANTH 8310. The Anthropology of Death: Body, Place, and Memory. [Formerly ANTH 329] Cultural responses to death in Western and non-Western societies. Emphasis on issues of how social relations, emotion, and memory are shaped in relation to ideas and practices focused on the body and the significance of places as sites of identity. Theory and perspectives from anthropology, religion, and philosophy. [3]

ANTH 8311. Violence and Its Embodiments in the Past and Present. [Formerly ANTH 328] Anthropology and bioarchaeology of violence in ancient and modern communities. Bioarchaeological theory and method to identify trauma and violence against the body. Study of war and other forms of violence, including domestic abuse, ritual battles, corporeal punishment. [3]

ANTH 8500. Teaching Anthropology. Preparation for teaching anthropology courses at the university level. Pedagogical practice and theory. Observations of master teachers; teaching practice and evaluation. Design of syllabi, readings, and assignments. Approaches to teaching challenging topics. [3]

ANTH 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly ANTH 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of Qualifying Examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12]

ANTH 9000. Seminar in Research Design. [Formerly ANTH 319] Objectives and strategies of contemporary research problems in anthropology; formulation, writing, and construction of grant proposals; interplay between data, method, and theory; develop skill in critiquing research ideas, techniques, and designs. [3]

ANTH 9001. Research Design in Anthropology. [Formerly ANTH 330] Research design, formulating research questions, and definition of appropriate data and methods. [3]

ANTH 9002. Publishing in Anthropology. Preparation to publish in peer-reviewed journals in anthropology and related fields. Peer-review process and editorial decisions. Issues in publishing patterns by sub-discipline, professional rank, and gender. Review of manuscripts in preparation. Familiarity with research design is expected. [3] ANTH 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ANTH 399] [0-12]

Graduate School Courses (PDF) - Anthropology courses page 78