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Upcoming Courses

Spring 2023

Undergraduate Courses

Sex and Gender in Everyday Life
Course Number: GSS 1150
Instructor: Allison Hammer or Kristen Navarro
Description: Sex and gender roles in culture and society. Gender, race, and class. Women and men in literature, art, culture, politics, institutions.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives, Eligible for African American and Diaspora Studies, Eligible for Latino/Latina Studies

 

Sex and Society
Course Number: GSS 1160
Instructor: Danyelle Valentine or Stacy Simplican
Description: Historical, cultural, and social contexts of sexual diversity, discrimination, and sexual violence. Understanding the centrality of sexuality to identity; challenging harmful modes of sexual expression; developing critical awareness of sex and sexuality.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives

 

Gender and the City
Course Number: GSS 1273
Instructor: Julie Gamble
Description: Gender and urban processes; spatial and social organization of the city. Geography of gender relations. Gender, sex, race/ethnicity, class, and ability as spatial power relations.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives

 

Sex and Scandals in Literature
Course Number: GSS 2252
Instructor: Allison Hammer
Description: From the eighteenth century to the present. Women’s and men’s disorderly conduct as represented in literary texts. Charlotte Rowson, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, Henry James, and Toni Morrison.
Attributes: AXLE: Humanities and the Creative Arts

 

Feminist Fictions
Course Number: GSS 2254
Instructor: Rory Dicker
Description: From the nineteenth century to the present. Feminist ideas and ideals as represented in literary texts. Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf, Alice Walker, and Margaret Atwood.
Attributes: AXLE: Humanities and the Creative Arts

 

Reading and Writing Lives
Course Number: GSS 2259W
Instructor: Nancy Reisman
Description: Interdisciplinary exploration of life-stories as narratives. Strategies of self-representation and interpretation, with particular attention to women. Includes fiction, biography, autobiography, history, ethnography, and the writing of life-story narratives.
“What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open.” This is Muriel Rukeyser’s view, and so many of us have learned how crucial can be to speak, to tell our stories and those of others, to be in conversation about our lives.
This course is about those stories, and the many ways of telling, illuminating emotional truths, bearing witness to other lives; and also about opening up the creative possibilities and play that enable us to write stories of our own.
In “Reading and Writing Lives” we’ll read and encounter a mix of forms – poems, stories, essays, graphic form memoir, film, performance – and talk both about the meanings of the work and the craft of making it. We’ll have some conversations with artists as part of the class. The course will give you the chance to explore your own creative writing using flash forms, and it is designed for people looking for ways into creative writing, as well as those with more familiarity. For the other writing in the course, we’ll draw on essay forms to synthesize responses to published texts and other media, and the artist conversations. The readings will include work by Alison Bechdel, Lydia Conklin, Melissa Febos, Claire Jimenez, Liss Platt, Donika Kelly, Hannah Gadsby, Danielle Evans, and many others.
No creative writing experience required.
Attributes: AXLE: 2000-level and above W course, AXLE: Humanities and the Creative Arts, Eligible for American Studies Major

 

Seminar on Gender and Violence
Course Number: GSS 2267
Instructor: Cara Tuttle Bell
Description: In-depth study of violence against women, with a service-learning component in a community setting. Topics include domestic abuse, rape, sexual harassment, pornography, and global violence. Focus on problems and potential solutions, examining violence on a societal, institutional, and individual level, interrogating the “personal as political,” and exposing power structures that shape our communities.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives, Eligible for Medicine Health and Society

 

Womanism in Global Context
Course Number: GSS 2610
Instructor: Danyelle Valentine
Description: Survey of global Womanist (Black Feminist) theory and praxis. Race, class, sexuality, spirituality, and activism. Controversies over female bodies.
Attributes: AXLE: International Cultures

 

Reproductive Justice in Transnational Contexts
Course Number: GSS 3301
Instructor: Stacy Simplican
Description: Women of color and human rights movement for bodily autonomy and comprehensive reproductive rights in the United States. How activists around the world use different strategies to promote sexual and reproductive human rights. How opponents attack abortion rights in US and globally.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives

 

Gender, Power, and Justice
Course Number: GSS 3304
Instructor: Kathryn Schwarz
Description: Theoretical, historical, and cultural analysis of power structures and politics; analysis of activist and academic responses to contemporary political questions.
What is the relationship between theory and practice? It’s an old question; still, as I write a course description amidst our current cultural dynamics, it strikes me with new force. We invest much energy to create theoretical paradigms for social experiences: theories of gendered, racial, economic, and sexual inequities; of discipline and ideology; of separatism, coalition, and community; of vulnerability, interdependence, oppression, and resistance. At what points do theory and practice meet to produce effective action, and to facilitate the pursuit of social justice?
As we consider the complicated nexus of gender, justice, and power, we’ll engage thinkers who interweave the conceptual with the experiential: feminists of color; queer activists; radical separatists; advocates for interrelation and coalition; creators of manifestoes and polemics. I’ll set some of these texts, but our archive will be a collaborative project. Each of you will have opportunities to share resources, drawn from your own disciplines, from contemporary popular discourses, and from other contexts that add depth and vitality to our conversations. We’ll work together to bring individual insights and experiences into conversation with one another. And we’ll approach theories of social justice not only on their terms but also on our own, with a degree of enthusiasm, a measure of skepticism, and at least a flicker of hope.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives, Eligible for ENGL credit

 

Reproductive Justice: The Politics of Reproduction, Family, and Liberty
Course Number: GSS 3306
Instructor: TBD
Description: Historical constructions of reproduction with attention to race, class, gender, sexuality, and dis/ability. Social constructs of family, motherhood, pregnancy, and parenting. Rights, health, agency, and freedom in the reproductive justice framework.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives

 

Gender, Justice, and the Urban Environment
Course Number:
GSS 3309
Instructor: Julie Gamble
Description: Transforming urban environments. Systems of power and privilege; inequalities such as gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, geographic location, and other dynamics that influence climate crisis response. Structures of oppression in the city via infrastructures, policies, and programs. Feminist, Black, Chicana, and decolonial methodologies.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives

 

Race, Citizenship, and Belonging in the United States
Course Number: GSS 3310
Instructor: Jenna Christian
Description: Citizenship and race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, ability. Citizenship through lenses of feminist scholarship, critical race theory, human geography, postcolonial theory, queer theory, and critical ethnic studies. Contemporary issues in U.S. context.
Attributes: AXLE: Perspectives

 

Capstone Colloquium
Course Number: GSS 4950
Instructor: Katie Crawford
Description: Seminar and workshop intended for immersion enrichment culminating in individual projects.

 

Senior Seminar
Course Number: GSS 4960
Instructor: Elizabeth Covington
Description: Advanced reading and research.

 

Graduate Courses

Gender and Pedagogy
Course Number: GSS 8302
Instructor: Kristen Navarro
Description: Feminist theories of teaching and learning; gender and diversity in the classroom; critical pedagogy.

 

Gender, Power, and Justice
Course Number: GSS 8304
Instructor: Kathryn Schwarz
Description: Theoretical, historical, and cultural analysis of power structures and politics; analysis of activist and academic responses to contemporary political questions.
What is the relationship between theory and practice? It’s an old question; still, as I write a course description amidst our current cultural dynamics, it strikes me with new force. We invest much energy to create theoretical paradigms for social experiences: theories of gendered, racial, economic, and sexual inequities; of discipline and ideology; of separatism, coalition, and community; of vulnerability, interdependence, oppression, and resistance. At what points do theory and practice meet to produce effective action, and to facilitate the pursuit of social justice?
As we consider the complicated nexus of gender, justice, and power, we’ll engage thinkers who interweave the conceptual with the experiential: feminists of color; queer activists; radical separatists; advocates for interrelation and coalition; creators of manifestoes and polemics. I’ll set some of these texts, but our archive will be a collaborative project. Each of you will have opportunities to share resources, drawn from your own disciplines, from contemporary popular discourses, and from other contexts that add depth and vitality to our conversations. We’ll work together to bring individual insights and experiences into conversation with one another. And we’ll approach theories of social justice not only on their terms but also on our own, with a degree of enthusiasm, a measure of skepticism, and at least a flicker of hope.
Attributes: Eligible for ENGL credit