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Being Muslim: How Local Islam Overturns Narratives of Exceptionalism

WORKSHOP III
Muslims Negotiating Modernities 
[click here for PDF of Workshop III Program] [click here for PDF of Workshop III Poster

SARRATT STUDENT CENTER, ROOM 216-220 

THURSDAY 18 SEPTEMBER

09:00-09:30:  Introductions and The Mapping Of The Intellectual Project
Tony K. Stewart, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in Humanities, Professor and Chair, Department of Religious Studies, and Project Convener, Vanderbilt University 
John M. Sloop, Interim Dean, College of Arts and Science, Vanderbilt University

09:30-12:30: Authoritative Forms of Modern Discourse 
Gary Bunt, Reader in Islamic Studies and Religious Studies, University of Wales Trinity Saint David
    “Islamic ‘Big Data’—the Fatwa Machine and Religious Authority Online”
Scott S. Reese, Professor, Department of History, Northern Arizona University
    “The Qadi is not a Judge: The Qadi’s Courts, Community and Authority in Early Twentieth Century Aden”
Leor Halevi, Associate Professor, Department of History, Vanderbilt University
    “Stealing Electricity, Handling Pork: Scruples and Qualms in the Transnational Labor for God and Mammon” Respondent: David J. Wasserstein, Eugene Greener, Jr. Professor of Jewish Studies, Professor of History, Vanderbilt University

13:30-16:30: Material Culture

Teren Sevea, Assistant Professor, Department of South Asia Studies, University of Pennsylvania
    “Muhammad’s American Gun: Technological Negotiations of Shooter-Faqirs in Modern Malaya”
Sarover Zaidi, Doctoral Fellow, Max Planck Institute, Department of Religious Diversity, Göttingen, Germany
    “Religious Moderns: Architecture and Selfhood in Bohra Shias of Bombay”
Pauline Lewis, PhD Student, Department of History, University of California–Los Angeles
    “Building Modernity: A Microhistory of a Late Ottoman Engineer" 
Respondent: Samira Sheikh, Associate Professor, Department of History, Vanderbilt University

FRIDAY 19 SEPTEMBER

09:00-13:00: Theorizing State and Sovereignty 
Simon Wolfgang Fuchs, PhD Candidate, Department of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University
     “Abū Muʿāwiyah’s Longings for the State: the Dialectics of the Local and the Transnational in Sunnī Shīʿi Sectarianism”
Ahmed Khanani, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of International Studies, Indiana University
    “Refiguring Islam and Democracy: Moroccan Islamiyun and the Language of Democracy”
Eric T. Schluessel, PhD Candidate, Department of History and Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University
    “The Muslim Emperor of China: Sacred History and Apocalypticism in Xinjiang, 1870s–1920s”
James M. Caron, Lecturer, Department of the Languages and Cultures of South Asia, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
    “Anarchism and Religion Across the Modern Indo-Afghan Frontier, 1880-1925”
Respondent: Moses Ochonu, Associate Professor, Department of History, Vanderbilt University

14:00-16:00: Expanding Media
Elizabeth Lhost, PhD Candidate, Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations and Department of History, University of Chicago 
    “Of Phonographs and Fatwas: Disputation, Print Culture, and Debating Islamic Modernism in British India”
Ahmad Nuril Huda, PhD Candidate, Netherlands Interuniversity School for Islamic Studies, Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, Leiden University
    “Santri Making Film: Islamic Temporality, Negotiated Technology, and Narratives of Modernity in an Indonesian Pesantren” 
Respondent: Richard McGregor, Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Vanderbilt University

SATURDAY 20 SEPTEMBER  

09:00-12:00: Everyday Negotiations  
Katrina Daly Thompson, Associate Professor, Department of African Languages and Literatures, University of Wisconsin–Madison
    “Gay Men Arising in Zanzibar: Transgressing Islamic Sexual Norms through Popobawa Talk”
Candace Mixon, PhD Candidate, Department of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina– Chapel Hill
    “Sufis in the City—Thinking of Style and Practice in the Lives of Modern Sufi Students”
Mara A. Leichtman, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Michigan State University
    “NGO-ization as Legitimization: The Expansion of a Shici Islamic Organization Within and Beyond Senegal” Respondent: Dianna Bell, Mellon Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Vanderbilt University

12:00-12:30: Closing Remarks 
David Gilmartin, Professor, Department of History, North Carolina State University
Richard McGregor, Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Vanderbilt University
Tony K. Stewart, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in Humanities, Professor and Chair, Department of Religious Studies, Vanderbilt University