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Courses Offered

LATS Courses for Fall 2019

ENGL 1111.19 First Year Writing Seminar: Growing Up Latino and Latina
TTh 9:35-10:50
Gretchen Selcke

What does it mean to “grow up Latinx” in the multicultural United States? In this course we will survey a broad range of cultural texts that provocatively and poignantly address the issues of language, education, race, migration, class and gender that influence the development of Latinx children and adolescents. We will pay special attention to coming-of-age stories that explore the psychological and political dimensions of encountering cultural difference and responding to the pressures of assimilation. The short stories, memoirs, essays, poems, journalism, films and video performances we will watch and read challenge their audiences to recognize the rich differences that define the Latinx community in the United States.

ENGL 1210W.08 Prose Fictions:  “Estamos Aquí:” Belonging in Contemporary Latinx Fiction
TTh 11:00-12:15
Gretchen Selcke

What does it mean to write about being Latinx in the United States? Explore the idea of belonging in literary works including Lucky Broken Girl, Juliet Takes a Breath, Her Body and Other Parties, and The Prince of Los Cocuyos. Works like these negotiate cultural, linguistic, gender, and class differences in dialogue with Tato Laviera's groundbreaking concept of nideaquínideallá. Performance will be evaluated by three essays, two cultural event responses, one presentation, and participation in class discussions. Students will develop critical writing skills and acquire greater knowledge of literary forms while reading and analyzing fiction by cutting-edge Latinx authors.  

Counts towards the Latino and Latina Studies major/minor and the African American and Diaspora Studies major/minor
Fulfills the “diverse perspectives” requirement for the English major/minor

ENGL 3658: Latino-American Literature: “Migration, Incarceration, and the Southern US Border”
MWF 9:10-10:00
Marzia Milazzo

This course aims to understand the relationship between migration and confinement in the United States, with a central focus on the politics of the Southern U.S. border and U.S.-Mexico relations in particular. As we center the significance of colonialism, anti-blackness, and anti-indigeneity to understanding anti-immigrant politics, we will consider the experiences of Latin American and Caribbean immigrants in the United States in light of larger Black and indigenous struggles for freedom and self-determination. In the process, we will ask: Why can some people cross borders more easily than others? What boundaries separate a “citizen” from an “alien” or a “criminal” from the “innocent”? What purposes do “Close the Border” discourses and anti-immigration propaganda serve? What does it mean to inhabit a border? What roles do neocolonialism and neoliberalism play in creating displacement and migration? What is the relationship between the Black Lives Matter movement, the immigrant rights movement, the prison abolition movement, and indigenous struggles for sovereignty in the United States? Main requirements: attendance, weekly homework, presentation, one midterm paper, one final paper or creative project. All students are welcome. No prior knowledge or special skill is required.

Counts towards the Latino and Latina Studies major/minor and the African American and Diaspora Studies major/minor
Fulfills the “diverse perspectives” requirement for the English major/minor

LATS 4961 and 5961: Latino and Latina Literature and Culture
Offered as an Independent Study

The Latino and Latina Studies seminar focuses on cultural productions and political and socioeconomic experiences of Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Dominicans inculcated with the U.S. experience. The seminar is designed to accommodate a range of voices and multiple manifestations of Latino and Latina identity and cultural expressions in historical and political contexts in film, poetry, narrative, essay, and music.  The reading include works such as Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderland/La Frontera, Juan Flores’ The Diaspora Strikes Back, and Miriam Jiménez and Juan Flores’ The Afro-Latino Reader, and films such as Miguel Piñero, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, and Zoot Suit. In this seminar students are expected to produce a research project as part of the course requirements.

Counts towards the Latino and Latina Studies major/minor
Fulfills the “diverse perspectives” requirement for the LATS and English major/minor

ELECTIVES: CATEGORY A: LATINA/O CULTURE
HOD 2510: Health Service Delivery to Diverse Population
SOC 3702: Racial and Ethnic Minorities in the United States
SPAN 3302: Spanish for Oral Communication Through Cultural Topics
SPAN 3303: Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature
SPAN 3345: Spanish for Business & Economics
SPAN 3830: Spanish for the Medical Profession
SPAN 4750: Afro-Hispanic Literature

CATEGORY B: HISTORICAL CONTEXT  
ANTH 3242: The Archaeology of the Ancient Maya Civilization
ANTH 3161: Colonial Encounters in the Americas
HIST 2570: Caribbean History, 1492-1983
HIST 2580: American Indian History before 1850
SPAN 4760: Literature and Medicine
SPAN 4465: The Theory and Practice of Drama

CATEGORY C: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES 
AADS 1010: Introduction to African American and Diaspora Studies
PHIL 3617: Philosophy of Language
PSCI 2219: Politics of Mexico
SOC 3701: Racial Domination, Racial Progress
WGS 1150: Sex and Gender in Everyday Life
WGS 1150w: Sex and Gender in Everyday Life  

LATS Courses for Fall 2019

CORE CLASSES:  
LATS/ENGL 1111 FYWS: Growing Up Latino and Latina
LATS/ENGL 1210W-08: Prose Fictions: “Estamos Aquí:” Belonging in Contemporary Latinx Fiction
LATS/ENGL 3658: Latino-American Literature 
LATS 4961: Latino and Latina Studies Seminar (as an Independent Study)

ELECTIVES: CATEGORY A: LATINA/O CULTURE 
SPAN 3302: Spanish for Oral Communication Through Cultural Topics   
SPAN 3303: Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature   
SPAN 3345: Spanish for Business & Economics

CATEGORY B: HISTORICAL CONTEXT  
ANTH 2106: Culture and Power in Latin America   
ANTH 3250:  The Inca Empire
ANTH 3240:  Ancient Mesoamerican Civilizations 

HIST 1380: Modern Latin America  
HIST 1383: Slave Resistance in the Americas  
HIST 2457: Drug Trafficking and Society in Latin America 
HIST 2510: Reform and Revolution in Latin America 
SOC 3602:  Change and Social Movements in the Sixties 
SPAN 3365: Film and Recent Cultural Trends in Spain 
SPAN 3893:  Special Topics in Hispanic Literature - Spanish Women Writers 
LAS 2101: Introduction to Latin America 
LAS 4550: Gender, Sexuality, and Family in Latin America

CATEGORY C: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES  
AADS 1010: Introduction to African American and Diaspora Studies  
ANTH 3134: Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples 
PSCI 2219: Politics of Mexico  
PSCI 2208: Law, Politics, and Justice 
SOC 3312: Environment and Development 
SOC 3704: Race, Gender, and Sport
WGS 1150: Sex and Gender in Everyday L
ife

For a list of forms including Undergraduate major change and Undergraduate enrollment in Graduate courses see the following:

Undergraduate Major Change/Declaration

Undergraduate enrollment in Graduate course