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Course Listings

Course Listings

For the days and times that the following classes meet, please refer to the Schedule of Classes at: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/more/SearchClasses!input.action

Detailed information as to how these courses apply towards requirements for the History of Art major or minor

Note that courses are arranged by Subject Area : Introductory survey courses and Freshman Seminars, 1000W courses, then courses in Non-Western, Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, and Modern Art, followed by Elective courses and Advanced Seminars.

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Effective Fall 2015, Vanderbilt University has introduced a new course catalog numbering scheme. For assistance with the translation between the new (4-digit) and old (3-digit) numbers, please consult the  Course Renumbering Lookup Tool.


SUMMER 2018 HISTORY OF ART
 COURSE OFFERING (Summer Session 2)

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. 
An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor. [3] Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

 

FALL 2018 HISTORY OF ART COURSE OFFERINGS

HART 1100: History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval Art.
 
An introduction, through lectures and readings, to the extraordinary range of works of art and architecture produced in the first 30,000 years of Western civilization up to about 1400--from the Prehistoric through Ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Medieval cultures. The first goal of this course is to enable students to apply the methods and vocabulary of art history in their thinking and writing, so that they will be able to analyze and compare the formal qualities of works of art. The second will be to deepen our understanding of the works we study by reading selected primary sources contemporary with the works of art, to learn something of their social, religious, and cultural circumstances. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor. [3] Moodey. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. 

An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor. [3] Johns, Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 1111-05: Impressionism in its Historical Context. Freshman Seminar. 
While Impressionist paintings by artists and their contemporaries are so popular in exhibitions, publications, and museum gift shops, the radical origins of the movement and its contested history are often overlooked. We will focus on nineteenth-century Impressionist artists such as Monet, Manet, Renoir, and Degas. We will ask questions beyond defining Impressionism as a style: What does it mean? Why did the Impressionists turn to landscape as their subject matter? What were the artists' attitudes toward industrialization, urbanization, and suburbanization? We will employ different critical strategies as we seek to answer these questions and raise new ones. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Fryd. (AXLE: HCA). 

HART 1111-12: Pompeii: Life and Death of a Roman City . Freshman Seminar.
Destroyed in the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE, the city of Pompeii is a unique time capsule, preserving physical evidence of all aspects of public and private life, social structures, and religion. This seminar will study Pompeii's evolution from its origins through its final days. We will consider urban forms and monuments and analyze art, inscriptions, gardens, and waterworks. We will explore city amenities, from theaters and amphitheaters to baths and brothels, and we will reconstruct domestic and public ritual practices. We will witness Pompeii's destruction in contemporary literature and track its afterlife since its rediscovery in the eighteenth century. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an Elective with departmental permission. [3] Robinson. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 1210W: Art and Ritual in Asia.
This course explores the arts of Asia through the lens of their ritual function across time. We will ask the questions: How has art-making developed in response to social and religious rituals over the course of centuries? In what ways have diverse social formations and religious traditions shaped rituals to suit their needs, and what are the different roles that the arts have played in them? What characteristics unite, as well as distinguish, the arts of the different Asian sub-regions? Finally, in the age of globalization, how have various cultures preserved their artistic traditions and rituals? Class time will be divided between lecture and discussions of both Asian art—in China, Japan, Korea, India, and elsewhere—and the craft of writing itself. The collections of the Vanderbilt University Fine Arts Gallery will provide prompts for some writing activities. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. (Note: the “Non-Western” requirement for the HART major requires a 2000-level course or above, see below in course listings). [3] Shin. (AXLE: INT). 

HART 1330W: Sacred Sites in World History. 
This course explores how human beings throughout history and across the world have created extraordinary places that connect them to the divine. Why are temples and tombs consistently the most grandiose creations of human societies? How do cultures design spaces that will enable them to reach beyond ordinary realities? What do these spaces share in common across time and space, and how do they differ? Each week we will explore several monuments or great works of architecture that illustrate a particular aspect of sacred buildings, such as the Pyramids, the Parthenon, Stonehenge, Romanesque cathedrals, Hagia Sophia, and Angkor Wat. In addition to gaining insight into the nature of religious architecture, students will also gain an overview of great works of architectural history, and of ancient civilizations across the world. Will count toward the HART Major, HART or ARCH Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Guengerich. (AXLE: SBS).

HART 1740W: Introduction to Design Studies.
Design encompasses us.  From the typeface in which these words are printed to the buildings that keep our classrooms comfortable to the forester-managed national parks that we visit in order to escape the artificial city, we inhabit an age in which everything on our planet is a product of human design.  And designers, born into a thoroughly designed world, continue to revise and recreate that world.  Indeed, the relationship between design and society are profoundly reciprocal. This class critically examines the exchange between the designed world of objects, images, and experiences, and the culture that creates, manipulates, and absorbs these designs. Our work together will lead to new questions and innovative ways of thinking about our material and immaterial worlds. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 3174: The South Asian Temple: Art and Devotion in South Asia.
Temples occupy a crucial place in the physical and sacred landscape of South Asia. At once meeting places for diverse communities, markers of piety and power, and architectural and sculptural wonders, temples are where artistic practice, devotion, and political and social aspirations come together. This lecture course explores the history, forms, and meanings of South Asian temples both as important works of architecture and centers of religious and social activity. Through topics such as ritual and sacred space, pilgrimage practice, representations of cosmology, and iconoclasm and appropriation, we will develop a multifaceted understanding of the temple in South Asia. The course will begin with the rock-cut cave temples of ancient India and end with contemporary temples in diaspora, for which we will visit the Sri Ganesha Temple in Nashville. This course will count toward the “Non-Western” area requirement for the HART major. [3] Shin. (AXLE: INT).

HART 2815: Digital Heritage: Methods and Practice: The Parthenon --Athens, Nashville, and Virtual.
This class will focus on digital approaches to artwork, architecture and built assemblages (civic and sacred space and place), and cultural landscapes. The Parthenon in Athens, Greece will be our subject, and the Nashville Parthenon our field school. Class time will be divided between substance and practice: 1) We will study the architecture, setting, and decoration of the Athenian Parthenon. 2) We will learn about the current “state of the art” and underlying theory of digital heritage studies, and gain practical experience in applications such as photography and photogrammetry; 2D and 3D modeling, rendering, and orthographic projections. Class time will include lectures, discussions, skill development, and workshopping. Students will gain experience in research design, the recording, processing, analysis, and presentation of two- and three-dimensional data—highly desirable skills in current art history, museum work, and heritage studies. Final projects will range from traditional studies of form, subject, iconography, and cultural context, to the use of photogrammetry and 3D modeling to explore the Parthenon. This course will count toward the “Ancient” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, ARCH Minor. [3] Robinson. (AXLE: HCA). 

HART 2270 Early Christian and Byzantine Art.
An introduction to the art of Late Antique and early medieval Europe from ca. 300-ca. 1000. We will begin with the later years of the Roman Empire, in Rome and then Constantinople, when the Christian Church was founded and began to develop its own art and architecture, and end with the Ottonian rulers in the 11th c., when the Western and Eastern branches of the Christian Church, increasingly divided by language (Latin for the West and Greek for the East) and by theological disputes, officially parted company. The patronage of this period is overwhelmingly Christian, in its Western and Byzantine branches, but we will also consider the influence of the art that emerged with the coming of Islam in the seventh century. This course will count toward the “Medieval” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, ARCH Minor. [3] Moodey. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 3334: Michelangelo Buonarroti, Life and Works.
This course will focus on the Italian Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti, 1475-1564. We will consider his sculpture, painting, architecture, and drawings, and to a somewhat lesser degree, his written works, including his poetry and letters. Our study of Michelangelo will be grounded in the cultural, historical, and religious climate of his day. Furthermore, we will consider the artistic ambient in Florence at the time of his training, and his profound influence not only upon artists of his generation, but those following. Thus, some consideration will also be given to other artists working in Florence and Rome, including Leonardo da Vinci and Raphael Santi, so that students will have an understanding of High Renaissance Art in Central Italy as a whole. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2600: Eighteenth-Century Art.
The history of European painting, sculpture, and printmaking from the Late Baroque era to the rise of Neoclassicism, ca. 1675–1775. Geographical focus on Italy and France. Artists include Maratti, Rusconi, Carriera, Tiepolo, Watteau, Chardin, Fragonard, and others. This course will count toward the "Modern" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Johns. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2710: Twentieth-Century European Art. 

A survey of major movements and artists, with examples from painting, architecture, prints, sculpture, performance and conceptual art, music, and cinema. Emphasis is placed on a close examination of the stylistic elements of the artworks, with that analysis contextualized within the social, political, and economic dynamics of the time in which they were made. Instruction places a heavy emphasis on the ideological nature of art and on its role as a major indicator of its time and place. This course will count toward the "Modern" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).   

HART 2765: Art since 1945.
The theory and practice of mostly American art since 1945, focusing upon modernism and postmodernism. Beginning with the emergence of large-scale abstract painting in New York in the post-war years, we will examine challenges to "formalist" conceptions of the picture and its priority on aesthetic quality as the guarantor of artistic value. We consider what was at stake in the redeployment of avant-garde artistic strategies in the 1950s and the adoption of serial forms and mechanized production processes by Minimalist and Pop artists in the 1960s. We analyze the so-called "dematerialization" of the art object and the rise of Conceptual Art; the relationship between art, its institutions and politics; the emergence and impact of new media; the rise of installation art as a dominant presentational form; and the work of selected contemporary artists. Besides examining a range of different art forms, we will also keep track of the critical debate that surrounded their emergence--students will be given an initial introduction to key ideas drawn from formalist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, feminist, and postmodern theory. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Fryd. (AXLE: US). 

HART 3810W-01: Exhibiting Historical Art: Daily Life in Ancient Mesoamerica.
In this course, students will curate a new exhibition on daily life in ancient Mesoamerica that will be displayed in Vanderbilt University’s Fine Arts Gallery. Students will be involved in content development, interpretive planning, and exhibition design. The basis of the show will be pre-conquest Mexican and Central American artifacts from Vanderbilt’s permanent collection. Students will learn about the history of these objects and critically engage with their interpretation. They will develop ways to contextualize them for exhibition visitors. This course will count as an Advanced Seminar, or as an “Ancient,” or as an Elective for the History of Art Major and Minor. [3] Eberl. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 3810W-02: Exhibiting Historical Art: Architecture at MoMA.
In July 2018, a major exhibition will open at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, entitled, “Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948-1980.” This seminar will investigate both the curation of the exhibition and its subject matter, the philosophically intricate, sometimes surreal, often spectacular architecture produced by the communist state of Yugoslavia during the Cold War. Among these are epic memorials that formed a pilgrimage network throughout Yugoslavia, unparalleled experiments in collective housing design, an elaborate infrastructure for coastal tourism, and the rebuilding of Skopje in a Brutalist idiom after the 1963 earthquake. The class will travel to New York City to encounter the exhibition first hand and to meet with members of the curatorial team. And, turning a critical eye to the exhibition as realized, the class will take forays into exhibition design, catalog production, and curatorial narrative, to develop a hypothetical alternate exhibition. This course will count as an Advanced Seminar, or as a “Modern,” or as an Elective for the History of Art Major and Minor, and ARCH Minor. [3] Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).

SPRING 2019 HISTORY OF ART COURSE OFFERINGS

(Tentative list; please check back for additions and updates.)

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. 
An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor. [3] VanDiver. (AXLE: HCA). 

HART 1205: Arts of South and Southeast Asia.
This survey course provides an introduction to the arts of South and Southeast Asia from the second millennium BCE to the present, including countries such as India, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Burma, and Malaysia.  We will look at selective artifacts and sites from these regions to understand the development of artistic traditions in response to cultural exchange and political dynamics.  We will also explore the formation of political and social identities as reflected in the artistic production of South and Southeast Asia. The main goals of the course are two-fold: 1) to learn the basic vocabulary and concepts for discussing different artistic traditions of South and Southeast Asia, and 2) to develop skills in analyzing Asian arts critically, using vocabulary and concepts acquired throughout the course. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor as a 1000-level course. [3] Shin. (AXLE: INT).

HART 1285W: Introduction to Medieval Art.
The period we call the Middle Ages was once considered the murky space between antiquity and modernity, but it includes a variety of distinctive cultures and their achievements in works as diverse as tiny illuminated manuscripts, massive stone cathedrals, tapestries woven with gold, fine metalwork for devotion and adornment, and sculpture for the dead.  This course looks primarily at the art of Western Europe, with attention to Byzantine and Islamic art, from about the third to the fifteenth century.  The visual arts are our primary focus, but we will also consider the religious, political, and social forces that shaped them, and the people who created and used them.  Although we will be using works of art and art-historical articles as subjects, students will become familiar with forms and conventions that will be useful for academic writing in general, especially in the humanities. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. (Note: the “Medieval” requirement for the HART major requires a 2000-level course or above). [3] Moodey. (AXLE: INT).

HART 1740W: Introduction to Design Studies.
Design encompasses us.  From the typeface in which these words are printed to the buildings that keep our classrooms comfortable to the forester-managed national parks that we visit in order to escape the artificial city, we inhabit an age in which everything on our planet is a product of human design.  And designers, born into a thoroughly designed world, continue to revise and recreate that world.  Indeed, the relationship between design and society are profoundly reciprocal. This class critically examines the exchange between the designed world of objects, images, and experiences, and the culture that creates, manipulates, and absorbs these designs. Our work together will lead to new questions and innovative ways of thinking about our material and immaterial worlds. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).

CLAS 2250: Roman Art and Architecture.
This course will investigate the sculpture, painting, architecture, and landscape architecture of the Roman world from later Hellenistic or Republican times to the reign of Constantine. Working chronologically, we will consider major genres, styles, and narrative modes, and highly developed practices in commemorative and political art. Where preservation allows, we will consider artistic programs in their original contexts, as in Pompeii and neighboring sites. Architectural topics will include city planning, landscape design, and architectural technology, as well as case studies of key building types and monuments. While our center-point will be the city of Rome, we will also survey cities across the imperial provinces, in which Roman architecture developed into a truly international style, at once symbolizing imperial unity and reflecting regional identity. This course will count toward the “Ancient” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, ARCH Minor. [3] Robinson. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2288: Art of the Book.  
Illuminated manuscript (literally “hand written”) books are arguably the most characteristic objects of the European middle ages, but contemporary artists have also responded to the challenge of making a book by hand. This course will consider the changing material and visual make-up of medieval illuminated manuscripts, and through them questions of literacy and audience, the mutation and popularity of certain texts and illustrations, the various contributions of script and picture, and the concerns of patron and artist. We will explore how much the impact of a work depends on the arrangement of words on the page, looking at examples from medieval grid-poems and pictorial initials, the Arts and Crafts revival of the book arts, Dada and Futurist publications, and contemporary artists’ books.  The class will work with medieval and modern material in Vanderbilt’s Special Collections. This course will count toward the "Medieval" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Moodey (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2390: Seventeenth-Century Art.
This lecture course provides a survey of the major developments in Western Art, including painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the later sixteenth through the seventeenth century, circa 1580-1700. Our focus this semester will be "Baroque" painting and sculpture, with the inclusion of several key architectural monuments. Our study will be organized geographically by artistic school and will begin in Italy, followed by Spain, France, Flanders, and Holland. The goal of this course is to introduce each student to the pivotal movements and masters, and to enable him or her to analyse and understand a variety of works and monuments, considering their subject and meaning, style, patronage and audience, as well as relate works of art to their respective cultural and historical contexts, including their connection with certain religious, social, and political issues. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA). 

HART 2720: Modern Architecture.
An in-depth study of developments in the history of architecture from the early 19th century to the present. Works of architecture will be considered as objects of intellectual and physical labor that can be studied for information about the historical period of their production. In addition to buildings, we will take architecture to include theory, drawings, unbuilt architecture, city planning, and ways in which architectural ideas are used in non-architectural media. Formal analysis and a social historical approach will address questions such as: Why was this building constructed? Whose purpose did it serve? How was it received in its own time? How does a consideration of its style help to answer the previous questions? Emphasis will be placed on relationships between style and content, and in turn to general historical conditions. The course intends to demonstrate that architectural production, as other forms of human behavior, can yield meaningful information about the historical process. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, ARCH Minor. [3] Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2740: Modern Design.
Over the past one-hundred-and-fifty years, scholars, designers, and cultural critics have responded to the changing nature of our artificial world in a variety of ways. Some have praised modernism, while others have looked at modernity as the end of civility, claiming that modern design destroys our values, morals, and ethics. This class looks at these varied responses and ways in which modernism has affected design processes and products.  Some of the topics we will assess include: new technology and the design process, race and modernism, modernity and gender, design and social class, design and luxury, design exhibitions, and modern design as cultural reform. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART major; HART Minor. [3] Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).  

HART 2775: History of Prints.
Woodcut, engraving, etching, and lithography from the fifteenth to the twentieth century. Scientific, devotional, ornamental, and documentary functions. Dürer, Piranesi, Hogarth, Daumier, and Kollwitz. Advances in technique and marketing, relationship to fine art, and place in popular culture. This course will count as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Price. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 3173W: Art and Empire in India, 1700-1950.
In this seminar, we will explore the visual and material cultures – painting, architecture, sculpture, photography, craft, print culture, and film – and institutions of art in the Indian subcontinent that rose from the impact of British colonial activity in South Asia since c. 1650. As we encounter these hybrid cultural forms, from portraits of East India Company officers in Mughal robes to Gothic Revival buildings in Bombay, we will examine the multidirectional process of negotiating and adapting different ways of making and seeing art, and ask how such interactions create spaces of dominance and resistance. Topics include cross-cultural, cross-media exchanges; formation of political, social, and religious identities; emergence of new audiences, patrons, institutions, and technology. This course will count as an “Advanced Seminar” for the HART Major or toward the “Non-Western” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Shin. (AXLE: P). 

HART 3605W: French Art in the Age of Louis XV: From Rococo to Neoclassicism.
This seminar will explore various topics and interpretive problems in the visual culture of French court art from 1715 to 1775.  A major focus will be the origins and aesthetic development of the Rococo in painting, sculpture, interior design and architecture.  Major artists to be studied include Antoine Watteau, Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin, François Boucher, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Etienne Falconet, Jean-Baptiste Pigalle, and Jean-Germain Boffrand.  Other important topics to be addressed include chinoiserie and various exoticisms, the emergence of women patrons such as Mme de Pompadour and Mme du Barry, the development of the porcelain industry at Sévres, and the domestication of royal spaces at Versailles. This course will count as an “Advanced Seminar” for the HART Major or toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Johns. (AXLE: INT).  

 

Updated 3/5/2018