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Course Listings

For the days and times that the following classes meet, please refer to the Schedule of Classes at: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/more/SearchClasses!input.action

Click here for detailed information as to how these courses apply towards requirements for the History of Art major or minor.

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SUMMER 2020 HISTORY OF ART and ARCHITECTURE COURSE OFFERINGS

SUMMER SESSION 2

HART 2325: Great Masters of the Italian Renaissance.
A roughly chronological introductory survey of the major developments in Italian Art from the late Gothic to the High Renaissance, ca. 1300-1520. Landmarks in painting, sculpture, and architecture in central Italy, focusing on Siena, Florence, and Rome. Trecento Sienese masters Duccio and the Lorenzetti; Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Botticelli, and Leonardo in Florence; and Michelangelo and Raphael in Rome. Tempera and fresco technique; civic, ecclesiastic, and domestic buildings; stylistic progression, context and meaning. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor; ARCH Major, ARCH Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt (AXLE: INT).

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FALL 2020 HISTORY OF ART and ARCHITECTURE COURSE OFFERINGS

Note that courses are arranged by Subject Area   : Introductory survey courses, Freshman Seminars, 1000W courses, then courses in Non-Western, Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, and Modern Art, followed by Elective courses and Advanced Seminars.

 

HART 1100: History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval Art.
 
An introduction, through lectures and readings, to the extraordinary range of works of art and architecture produced in the first 30,000 years of Western civilization up to about 1400--from the Prehistoric through Ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Medieval cultures. The first goal of this course is to enable students to apply the methods and vocabulary of art history in their thinking and writing, so that they will be able to analyze and compare the formal qualities of works of art. The second will be to deepen our understanding of the works we study by reading selected primary sources contemporary with the works of art, to learn something of their social, religious, and cultural circumstances. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Elizabeth Moodey. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. 

An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 1122: History of Western Architecture II.
In this course,various buildings, urban schemes, landscapes and other architectural subjects from 1700 to the present will be considered in relation to their aesthetic, cultural, social, and political contexts at the time of their construction and in their later reappraisals by historians and designers. This course, in addition to providing a survey of prominent as well as some obscure but significant designs and styles, will investigate projects’ relevance to contemporary practice and discourse. Among the architects we will consider are Perrault, Piranesi, Wren, Viollet-le-Duc, Corbusier, Wright, and Gehry. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: INT).

 

HART 1200: Arts of East Asia.
An exploration of the cultural traditions of East Asia--China, Japan, and Korea--from the 2nd millennium BCE to the 19th century CE through the visual arts. Architecture, painting, ceramics, and sculpture will be examined both as works collected and admired for their aesthetic qualities as well as examples of the culture in which they were produced. Considerations of style will be used to aid in answering questions regarding a work's commission, production, and social significance. Thus, the historical, religious, philosophical, and cultural background will form the framework of our study. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor as a 1000-level course. (Note: the “Non-Western” requirement for the HART major requires a 2000-level course or above, see below in course listings). [3] Tracy Miller. (AXLE: INT).

 

HART 1111-07: The Meaning of Modern Art in its Political Context. Freshman Seminar. 
This course will present art of the modern period, the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and ask of that art what it means, and how and why that meaning was produced. Why is modern art so difficult to understand? Why does it look so unrealistic, and why is its meaning so hidden? This course will approach these questions seriously. To understand modern art and why it looks as it does, we must study modern history and society, especially its politics. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Leonard Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).  

 

HART 1111-10: Ancient Art and Ethics.  Freshman Seminar. 
Who owns the past? Should the British Museum return the so-called Elgin Marbles to Greece? Whatever happened to the antiquities stolen from the Baghdad Museum following the US invasion in 2003? This course considers the ethical issues surrounding the visual and material culture of ancient societies, including the looting of archaeological sites, the international antiquities market, the display of artifacts in museums, repatriation of stolen antiquities, and cultural heritage management. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Mireille Lee. (AXLE: HCA). 

 

HART 1210W: Art and Ritual in Asia.
This course explores the arts of Asia through the lens of their ritual function across time. We will ask the questions: How has art-making developed in response to social and religious rituals over the course of centuries? In what ways have diverse social formations and religious traditions shaped rituals to suit their needs, and what are the different roles that the arts have played in them? What characteristics unite, as well as distinguish, the arts of the different Asian sub-regions? Finally, in the age of globalization, how have various cultures preserved their artistic traditions and rituals? Class time will be divided between lecture and discussions of both Asian art—in China, Japan, Korea, India, and elsewhere—and the craft of writing itself. The collections of the Vanderbilt University Fine Arts Gallery will provide prompts for some writing activities. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. (Note: the “Non-Western” requirement for the HART major requires a 2000-level course or above, see below in course listings). [3] Heeryoon Shin. (AXLE: INT). 

 

HART 2120: The Arts of Korea.
The history of Korea from ancient times to the present through the lens of art and culture. This interdisciplinary course examines intersections of art, religion, and politics in Korea, as well as Korea’s interactions with China and Japan. We will discuss: the formation of the early Korean kingdoms and the transmission of Buddhism; the role of female artists and patrons; the pre-modern Korean porcelain industry and trade in the trans-regional context; the influences of Buddhist and Confucian thought over Korean aesthetics and art production in pre-modern times; visual culture and politics under Japanese colonial rule; modern and contemporary Korean art and its interaction with the global art world; the relationship between art and state in the North Korean regime; and the interaction between contemporary art and K-pop. Students will have opportunities to examine art objects at the Vanderbilt University Fine Arts Gallery, and learn how to apply interdisciplinary methods to analyze visual materials. No background in Asian/Korean studies or art history is necessary for the successful completion of this course. This course will count toward the “Non-Western” area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Heeryoon Shin. (AXLE: INT). 

 

HART 2210: Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt.

This course explores the development of Egyptian art and architecture from the Predynastic period through the era of Roman rule. Emphasis will be placed on the use of monumental building projects such as pyramids and temples, and visual images including sculpture and painting in constructing the ideology of pharaonic rulership. Other topics include: the emergence of social stratification and statehood; the economy and administration of the Egyptian state; relationships between Egypt and neighboring cultures; Egyptian daily life; roles of slaves and the working classes; roles of women; relationships between humans and the divine; and Egyptian beliefs in the afterlife. Finally, we will consider how others’ esteem for the Egyptians, in antiquity and the modern era, has affected our understanding of this fascinating culture. This course will count toward the “Ancient” area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major, HART Minor, and toward the ARCH Major, ARCH Minor. [3] Mireille Lee (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2270: Early Christian and Byzantine Art.
 
An introduction to the art of Late Antique and early medieval Europe from ca. 300-ca. 1000. We will begin with the later years of the Roman Empire, in Rome and then Constantinople, when the Christian Church was founded and began to develop its own art and architecture, and end with the Ottonian rulers in the 11th c., when the Western and Eastern branches of the Christian Church, increasingly divided by language (Latin for the West and Greek for the East) and by theological disputes, officially parted company. The patronage of this period is overwhelmingly Christian, in its Western and Byzantine branches, but we will also consider the influence of the art that emerged with the coming of Islam in the seventh century. This course will count toward the “Medieval” area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Elizabeth Moodey. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2620: Nineteenth-Century European Art.
From the French Revolution to the early twentieth century. International context for artistic movements, including Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. The rise of abstraction and the relationship between art, politics, and social change. This course will count toward the "Modern" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Christopher Johns. (AXLE: INT).

 

HART 2710: Twentieth-Century European Art. 

A survey of major movements and artists, with examples from painting, architecture, prints, sculpture, performance and conceptual art, music, and cinema. Emphasis is placed on a close examination of the stylistic elements of the artworks, with that analysis contextualized within the social, political, and economic dynamics of the time in which they were made. Instruction places a heavy emphasis on the ideological nature of art and on its role as a major indicator of its time and place. This course will count toward the "Modern" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Leonard Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2755: Women in Art since 1850.  
Historical survey of European and American women artists and their artistic contributions from 1850 to the present. Arranged chronologically and thematically, we will consider how gender identity influenced the circumstances under which women artists work and examine the forms their art took. We will begin by learning about second-wave feminism in the 1970s and the concurrent development of feminist art history. Building on this theoretical foundation we will examine how employing a feminist lens alters the way we look at art produced throughout history and even challenges dominant notions of art itself. A priority is placed upon the visual analysis of specific art objects and an attentive, critical engagement with key texts. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: P). 

 

HART 2820: Architectural Heritage: Research and Documentation.
In this seminar, students will collaborate to produce an historic structure report on the Vaughn Home, one of the earliest buildings on Vanderbilt’s Campus. The course will be taught at the Home, which houses the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities. Students will participate in an in-depth architectural analysis of the Vaughn Home including its original design, evolving function, later renovation, and preservation as an historically significant element of Vanderbilt’s campus. Investigative paths will include research into public records and historical publications, archival research in personal and institutional archives and construction records, surveying and documentation of existing conditions, and evaluation and contextualization of architectural designs and renovations. The student-produced report will detail the history and character of the house and will be delivered to the university for use in future planning, renovation, exhibition, and publications. Counts toward HART Major as an Elective; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: US).

 

HART 3140: Healing and Art in East Asia. 
Because the physical environment(s) of healing, as well as the appearance of healing specialists, medicines, and the tools to consume them, all impact the effectiveness of healing outcomes, much about a society’s conception of health and beauty can be explored through examining objects for curing and healing. In this course we will look at the influence of early healing practices on the development of the arts of East Asia. Topics to be examined include: magical healing texts, talismans, and tattoos; diagraming the body and the landscape; the art of the Buddha of Medicine, gardens and growing transformative herbs, and tea as medicine and art. This course will count toward the “Non-Western” area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Tracy Miller. (AXLE: HCA). 

 

HART 3334: Michelangelo Buonarroti, Life and Works.
 
This course will focus on the Italian Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti, 1475-1564. We will consider his sculpture, painting, architecture, and drawings, and to a somewhat lesser degree, his written works, including his poetry and letters. Our study of Michelangelo will be grounded in the cultural, historical, and religious climate of his day. Furthermore, we will consider the artistic ambient in Florence at the time of his training, and his profound influence not only upon artists of his generation, but those following. Thus, some consideration will also be given to other artists working in Florence and Rome, including Leonardo da Vinci and Raphael Santi, so that students will have an understanding of High Renaissance Art in Central Italy as a whole. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 3333/EES 3333. Climate and Society.
Climate change, sea-level fluctuations, and floods from antiquity to the present. Science of climate, coasts, and rivers. Interdisciplinary analysis of urban form and history. Physical, social, technological, and aesthetic influences. Past, present, and future cities in Near East, Europe, Asia, and North America, including Nashville, New Orleans, and New York. This course will count as an Elective for the HART Major, HART Minor, and toward the ARCH Major, ARCH Minor. [3] Betsey Robinson (HART) and Jonathan Gilligan, Steve Goodbred (EES) (AXLE: P).

 

HART 3605W: French Art in the Age of Louis XV: From Rococo to Neoclassicism.
This seminar will explore various topics and interpretive problems in the visual culture of French court art from 1715 to 1775.  A major focus will be the origins and aesthetic development of the Rococo in painting, sculpture, interior design and architecture.  Major artists to be studied include Antoine Watteau, Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin, François Boucher, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Etienne Falconet, Jean-Baptiste Pigalle, and Jean-Germain Boffrand.  Other important topics to be addressed include chinoiserie and various exoticisms, the emergence of women patrons such as Mme de Pompadour and Mme du Barry, the development of the porcelain industry at Sévres, and the domestication of royal spaces at Versailles. This course will count as an “Advanced Seminar” for the HART Major or toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Christopher Johns. (AXLE: INT).  

 

HART 3810W: Exhibiting Historical Art: The Vanderbilt Family and the Gilded Age.
The Vanderbilts were among America's most influential taste-makers of the Gilded Age. Their vast wealth fueled the acquisition of fine art, while it also financed the construction of both city and resort residences. In this course, students will consider varieties of exhibition practices and decide together the best way to present the Vanderbilt family's cultural influence. Students will plan and develop an exhibition using objects from Vanderbilt Library's Special Collections and from elsewhere on campus, together with proposing loans of objects from other libraries and museums. This course is part of an Immersion sequence on the Vanderbilts as Patrons, and while some students will be taking it for that purpose, it is not a required aspect of the seminar. This course will count as an Advanced Seminar or as a “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Kevin Murphy. (AXLE: HCA).

 

SPRING 2021 (TENATIVE) HISTORY OF ART COURSE OFFERINGS

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. 
An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor as a 1000-level course. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: HCA). 

 

HART 1205: Arts of South and Southeast Asia.
This survey course provides an introduction to the arts of South and Southeast Asia from the second millennium BCE to the present, including countries such as India, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Burma, and Malaysia.  We will look at selective artifacts and sites from these regions to understand the development of artistic traditions in response to cultural exchange and political dynamics.  We will also explore the formation of political and social identities as reflected in the artistic production of South and Southeast Asia. The main goals of the course are two-fold: 1) to learn the basic vocabulary and concepts for discussing different artistic traditions of South and Southeast Asia, and 2) to develop skills in analyzing Asian arts critically, using vocabulary and concepts acquired throughout the course. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor as a 1000-level course. [3] Heeryoon Shin. (AXLE: INT).

 

HART 1111-17: New York City Architecture: Form and Fantasy. Freshman Seminar. 
This course provides an introduction to architectural history and criticism and focuses on the history of the built environment of New York City as imagined and realized. Students will explore approaches to understanding the aesthetics and the operations of the built environment, and will trace the development of the city, as understood through its constructed environment, from European contact in the seventeenth century to the present. The course will consider architectural trends, urban planning, technologies of construction and transportation, the development of neighborhoods, the design and construction of urban parks, as well as impact of class and race, immigration, and global trade on patterns of urban life.  Discussion and readings will also consider the ambiguities of preservation and the difficulties of confirming and representing historical fact. Will count toward the HART Major, Minor or ARCH Major, Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: US). 

 

HART 1285W: Introduction to Medieval Art.
The period we call the Middle Ages was once considered the murky space between antiquity and modernity, but it includes a variety of distinctive cultures and their achievements in works as diverse as tiny illuminated manuscripts, massive stone cathedrals, tapestries woven with gold, fine metalwork for devotion and adornment, and sculpture for the dead.  This course looks primarily at the art of Western Europe, with attention to Byzantine and Islamic art, from about the third to the fifteenth century.  The visual arts are our primary focus, but we will also consider the religious, political, and social forces that shaped them, and the people who created and used them.  Although we will be using works of art and art-historical articles as subjects, students will become familiar with forms and conventions that will be useful for academic writing in general, especially in the humanities. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. (Note: the “Medieval” requirement for the HART major requires a 2000-level course or above). [3] Elizabeth Moodey. (AXLE: INT).

 

HART 1740W: Introduction to Design Studies.
Design encompasses us.  From the typeface in which these words are printed to the buildings that keep our classrooms comfortable to the forester-managed national parks that we visit in order to escape the artificial city, we inhabit an age in which everything on our planet is a product of human design.  And designers, born into a thoroughly designed world, continue to revise and recreate that world.  Indeed, the relationship between design and society are profoundly reciprocal. This class critically examines the exchange between the designed world of objects, images, and experiences, and the culture that creates, manipulates, and absorbs these designs. Our work together will lead to new questions and innovative ways of thinking about our material and immaterial worlds. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2100: Architecture and the Mapping of Empire in Asia.
Empires in Asia were built through military and economic conquest. But after the dust settled, architecture, as the most visible and persistent public art, was used to sustain imperial identity and authority.  Why did emperors, empresses, and aspiring officials sponsor monumental architectural constructs, including cities, palaces, temples, tombs, universities, and museums, to display their imperial aspirations, social stations, and/or spiritual inclinations in Asia? Once established, how was visual culture used to expand the reach of those individuals and the corporate structures they represented? This course examines methods of mapping empire through the construction of highly visible, highly potent monuments.  Major themes to be covered include cosmology in the construction of cities, temples, and gardens; physical manifestations of divine kingship and royal divinities, appropriation of ancient models to enhance legitimacy; architecture and the expression of ethnic/state identities across Asia from the 3rd century BCE through the 20th century CE. This course will count toward the “Non-Western” area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Tracy Miller and Heeryoon Shin. (AXLE: P).

 

HART 2130: The Arts of Japan.
This course is an introduction to artistic culture created within the territory of Japan. The main goal of the course is to familiarize the student with the complexities in visual form present in this region from the Neolithic period through the nineteenth century.  As such we will touch on ceramics; tombs and the objects contained within them; the temples, sculpture, and paintings inspired by religion; the art and culture of tea; gardens, castles, and palaces; and the pictorial arts of the Floating World.  The course is structured chronologically, but within each time period emphasis will be placed on the cultural context of the works discussed, be it practical, political, or spiritual. This course will count toward the "Non-Western" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Tracy Miller. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2288: Art of the Book.  
Illuminated manuscript (literally “hand written”) books are arguably the most characteristic objects of the European middle ages, but contemporary artists have also responded to the challenge of making a book by hand. This course will consider the changing material and visual make-up of medieval illuminated manuscripts, and through them questions of literacy and audience, the mutation and popularity of certain texts and illustrations, the various contributions of script and picture, and the concerns of patron and artist. We will explore how much the impact of a work depends on the arrangement of words on the page, looking at examples from medieval grid-poems and pictorial initials, the Arts and Crafts revival of the book arts, Dada and Futurist publications, and contemporary artists’ books.  The class will work with medieval and modern material in Vanderbilt’s Special Collections. This course will count toward the "Medieval" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Elizabeth Moodey (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2320W: The Italian Renaissance Workshop.  
A consideration of Italian Renaissance artists' workshops and the collaborative artistic process, covering material from the 14th into the 16th century, but with a focus on the fifteenth-century in Florence. We will study the organization, structure, and production of shops, painting and sculpture techniques, and the role of artists in society. Case studies will include artists such as Lorenzo Ghiberti, Donatello, Fra Angelico, Andrea del Verrocchio and the young Leonardo da Vinci, and Sandro Botticelli. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2390: Seventeenth-Century Art.
This lecture course provides a survey of the major developments in Western Art, including painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the later sixteenth through the seventeenth century, circa 1580-1700. Our focus this semester will be "Baroque" painting and sculpture, with the inclusion of several key architectural monuments. Our study will be organized geographically by artistic school and will begin in Italy, followed by Spain, France, Flanders, and Holland. The goal of this course is to introduce each student to the pivotal movements and masters, and to enable them to analyse and understand a variety of works and monuments, considering their subject and meaning, style, patronage and audience, as well as relate works of art to their respective cultural and historical contexts, including their connection with certain religious, social, and political issues. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA). 

 

HART 2720: Modern Architecture.
 
An in-depth study of developments in the history of architecture from the early 19th century to the present. Works of architecture will be considered as objects of intellectual and physical labor that can be studied for information about the historical period of their production. In addition to buildings, we will take architecture to include theory, drawings, unbuilt architecture, city planning, and ways in which architectural ideas are used in non-architectural media. Formal analysis and a social historical approach will address questions such as: Why was this building constructed? Whose purpose did it serve? How was it received in its own time? How does a consideration of its style help to answer the previous questions? Emphasis will be placed on relationships between style and content, and in turn to general historical conditions. The course intends to demonstrate that architectural production, as other forms of human behavior, can yield meaningful information about the historical process. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Leonard Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 3753W: Imaging the “Other” in Art.
Constructions and displays of difference and “otherness” in American and European art from the 19th to the 21st centuries.  How has art and the display of art shaped ideas of racial difference? In this class we will consider the role and display of visual art in inscribing and at times challenging racial hierarchies. Focusing on representations of bodies, we will examine prints, paintings, performances, films, and photographs that contributed to the construction of Black, Native American, Latino/a identities, and interwoven issues of class, gender, and sexuality. As a discussion-based seminar, we will examine the relationship of art and “otherness” through topics including Orientalism, colonialism, primitivism, anthropology, the use of racial and ethnic stereotypes in art, as well as the politics of display and censorship. This course will count as an Advanced Seminar or as a “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: P).

 

HART 3810W: Exhibiting Historical Art: Curating the Vaughn Home.
HART 3810W is a course in which students research, design, and curate an exhibition. 
In Spring 2021, this course will focus on the Vaughn Home, one of Vanderbilt University's seven original faculty houses and thus among the oldest buildings on our campus, dating to 1875. For the rich history of the house, see: https://www.vanderbilt.edu/rpw_center/vaughnhistory.php  Today, it is the location of the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities. This Victorian house is architecturally and culturally important. Students will develop and design an exhibition that will focus on the home’s institutional and architectural history. Exhibited objects will cover a wide range, from documents and photographs to furniture and other decorative arts. This course will count as an Advanced Seminar or as a “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor; and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).

 

Updated 6/28/2020