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Course Listings

For the days and times that the following classes meet, please refer to the Schedule of Classes at: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/more/SearchClasses!input.action

Click here for detailed information as to how these courses apply towards requirements for the History of Art major or minor.

Note that courses are arranged by Subject Area  : Introductory survey courses and Freshman Seminars, 1000W courses, then courses in Non-Western, Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, and Modern Art, followed by Elective courses and Advanced Seminars.

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Effective Fall 2015, Vanderbilt University has introduced a new course catalog numbering scheme. For assistance with the translation between the new (4-digit) and old (3-digit) numbers, please consult the  Course Renumbering Lookup Tool. 

 

SPRING 2019 HISTORY OF ART COURSE OFFERINGS

Note that courses are arranged by Subject Area  : Introductory survey courses, Freshman Seminars, 1000W courses, then courses in Non-Western, Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, and Modern Art, followed by Elective courses and Advanced Seminars.

 

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. 
An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: HCA). 

HART 1111-14: Art and Controversy in 20th-Century America. Freshman Seminar.
Art often mirrors culture, but what happens when art does not reflect the views of the society or culture that produces it? Since this is an Art History course, we will study recent and historical controversies concerning the visual arts that address questions of government funding, the role of public art, censorship, decency, morality, and issues of diversity and inclusion. As a writing course, this seminar will introduce students to the specific demands of academic writing. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an Elective with departmental permission; please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: US).

RLST 1111-13: Renaissance Art and Politics. Freshman Seminar.
This course examines the history of the Renaissance in Florence, Rome, and Nuremberg, three major cultural centers that underwent profound transformations in art, religion, and political structure. We will study politics and religion as a basis for interpreting the functions of Renaissance art. Above all, we will examine how art and religious culture contested and created political power and authority. Will count toward the HART Major as an Elective with departmental permission; please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies. [3] David Price. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 1205: Arts of South and Southeast Asia.
This survey course provides an introduction to the arts of South and Southeast Asia from the second millennium BCE to the present, including countries such as India, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Burma, and Malaysia.  We will look at selective artifacts and sites from these regions to understand the development of artistic traditions in response to cultural exchange and political dynamics.  We will also explore the formation of political and social identities as reflected in the artistic production of South and Southeast Asia. The main goals of the course are two-fold: 1) to learn the basic vocabulary and concepts for discussing different artistic traditions of South and Southeast Asia, and 2) to develop skills in analyzing Asian arts critically, using vocabulary and concepts acquired throughout the course. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor as a 1000-level course. [3] Heeryoon Shin. (AXLE: INT).

HART 1285W: Introduction to Medieval Art.
The period we call the Middle Ages was once considered the murky space between antiquity and modernity, but it includes a variety of distinctive cultures and their achievements in works as diverse as tiny illuminated manuscripts, massive stone cathedrals, tapestries woven with gold, fine metalwork for devotion and adornment, and sculpture for the dead.  This course looks primarily at the art of Western Europe, with attention to Byzantine and Islamic art, from about the third to the fifteenth century.  The visual arts are our primary focus, but we will also consider the religious, political, and social forces that shaped them, and the people who created and used them.  Although we will be using works of art and art-historical articles as subjects, students will become familiar with forms and conventions that will be useful for academic writing in general, especially in the humanities. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. (Note: the “Medieval” requirement for the HART major requires a 2000-level course or above). [3] Elizabeth Moodey. (AXLE: INT).

HART 1400: U.S. Icons and Monuments.
The chronological scope of this lecture course ranges from 1776 to the present, and will cover important North American icons and monuments such as George Washington, the U.S. Capitol, the Statue of Liberty, Mount Rushmore, Marilyn Monroe, and Michael Jordan, among many others. We will consider how and why images of people, historical events, and symbols are revered, and the associated implications for national identity, historical memory, consumerism, and political ideologies. No credit for students who have completed the Freshman Seminar HART 1111-13 also taught by Prof. Fryd and similarly titled due to overlap in content. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor. [3] Vivien Fryd. (AXLE: US).

HART 1740W: Introduction to Design Studies.
Design encompasses us.  From the typeface in which these words are printed to the buildings that keep our classrooms comfortable to the forester-managed national parks that we visit in order to escape the artificial city, we inhabit an age in which everything on our planet is a product of human design.  And designers, born into a thoroughly designed world, continue to revise and recreate that world.  Indeed, the relationship between design and society are profoundly reciprocal. This class critically examines the exchange between the designed world of objects, images, and experiences, and the culture that creates, manipulates, and absorbs these designs. Our work together will lead to new questions and innovative ways of thinking about our material and immaterial worlds. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).

CLAS 2250: Roman Art and Architecture.
This course will investigate the sculpture, painting, architecture, and landscape architecture of the Roman world from later Hellenistic or Republican times to the reign of Constantine. Working chronologically, we will consider major genres, styles, and narrative modes, and highly developed practices in commemorative and political art. Where preservation allows, we will consider artistic programs in their original contexts, as in Pompeii and neighboring sites. Architectural topics will include city planning, landscape design, and architectural technology, as well as case studies of key building types and monuments. While our center-point will be the city of Rome, we will also survey cities across the imperial provinces, in which Roman architecture developed into a truly international style, at once symbolizing imperial unity and reflecting regional identity. This course will count toward the “Ancient” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, ARCH Minor. [3] Betsey Robinson. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2288: Art of the Book.  
Illuminated manuscript (literally “hand written”) books are arguably the most characteristic objects of the European middle ages, but contemporary artists have also responded to the challenge of making a book by hand. This course will consider the changing material and visual make-up of medieval illuminated manuscripts, and through them questions of literacy and audience, the mutation and popularity of certain texts and illustrations, the various contributions of script and picture, and the concerns of patron and artist. We will explore how much the impact of a work depends on the arrangement of words on the page, looking at examples from medieval grid-poems and pictorial initials, the Arts and Crafts revival of the book arts, Dada and Futurist publications, and contemporary artists’ books.  The class will work with medieval and modern material in Vanderbilt’s Special Collections. This course will count toward the "Medieval" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Elizabeth Moodey (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2320W: The Italian Renaissance Workshop. 
A consideration of Italian Renaissance artists' workshops and the collaborative artistic process, covering material from the 14th into the 16th century, but with a focus on the fifteenth-century in Florence. We will study the organization, structure, and production of shops, painting and sculpture techniques, and the role of artists in society. Case studies will include artists such as Lorenzo Ghiberti, Fra Angelico, Andrea del Verrocchio and the young Leonardo da Vinci, and Sandro Botticelli. A focus of the course will be the firsthand study of paintings in the Kress Collection at Vanderbilt, which originate primarily from Central and Northern Italy. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2390: Seventeenth-Century Art.
This lecture course provides a survey of the major developments in Western Art, including painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the later sixteenth through the seventeenth century, circa 1580-1700. Our focus this semester will be "Baroque" painting and sculpture, with the inclusion of several key architectural monuments. Our study will be organized geographically by artistic school and will begin in Italy, followed by Spain, France, Flanders, and Holland. The goal of this course is to introduce the pivotal movements and masters, and to enable students to analyse and understand a variety of works and monuments, considering their subject and meaning, style, patronage and audience, as well as relate works of art to their respective cultural and historical contexts, including their connection with certain religious, social, and political issues. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA). 

HART 2720: Modern Architecture.
 
An in-depth study of developments in the history of architecture from the early 19th century to the present. Works of architecture will be considered as objects of intellectual and physical labor that can be studied for information about the historical period of their production. In addition to buildings, we will take architecture to include theory, drawings, unbuilt architecture, city planning, and ways in which architectural ideas are used in non-architectural media. Formal analysis and a social historical approach will address questions such as: Why was this building constructed? Whose purpose did it serve? How was it received in its own time? How does a consideration of its style help to answer the previous questions? Emphasis will be placed on relationships between style and content, and in turn to general historical conditions. The course intends to demonstrate that architectural production, as other forms of human behavior, can yield meaningful information about the historical process. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, ARCH Minor. [3] Leonard Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 2740: Modern Design.
Over the past one-hundred-and-fifty years, scholars, designers, and cultural critics have responded to the changing nature of our artificial world in a variety of ways. Some have praised modernism, while others have looked at modernity as the end of civility, claiming that modern design destroys our values, morals, and ethics. This class looks at these varied responses and ways in which modernism has affected design processes and products.  Some of the topics we will assess include: new technology and the design process, race and modernism, modernity and gender, design and social class, design and luxury, design exhibitions, and modern design as cultural reform. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART major; HART Minor. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA). 

HART 2775: History of Prints.
Woodcut, engraving, etching, and lithography from the fifteenth to the twentieth century. Religious, political, ornamental, and documentary functions. Dürer, Cranach, Holbein, Merian, Rembrandt, Piranesi, Hogarth, Daumier, and Kollwitz. Advances in technique, relationship to fine art, and place in popular culture. The class will be working firsthand with prints in the Vanderbilt Fine Arts Gallery collection. This course will count as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] David Price. (AXLE: HCA).

CLAS 3600. Seminar in the Digital Humanities.
Theory, method, and applications in history, classics, and religious studies. Focus on historical data and research tools in the study of the Mediterranean world. Integration and manipulation of textual and spatial data. Scholarly interfacing and public access. New media. Developing research plans. This course will count as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] David Michelson. (AXLE: SBS).

HART 3810: Exhibiting Historical Art: Contemporary Art at the 13th Havana Biennial in Cuba.
This course intersects with the 13th Havana Biennial in Matanzas, Cuba, to occur Spring 2019, and for which Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, the Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Fine Arts, is the Artistic Director. The Havana Biennial, established in 1984, focuses on artists from the Americas, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East to underscore the international aspect of contemporary art. The April 12-May 19, 2019 Biennial will be held in Havana, as has been the tradition, but it will also be held in expositions outside that city for the first time. We will study a selection of about thirty international artists that Campos-Pons has chosen to be shown in her hometown of Matanzas. As part of our work for the course we will write exhibition text and signage, as well as an essay for one of the publications for the Symposium of Alternative Presses, which will run concurrent with the Biennial. This course will count as a “Modern,” or as an Elective for the History of Art Major and Minor. [3] Vivien Fryd. (AXLE: HCA).

HART 3173W: Advanced Seminar: Art and Empire in India, 1700-1950.
In this seminar, we will explore the visual and material cultures – painting, architecture, sculpture, photography, craft, print culture, and film – and institutions of art in the Indian subcontinent that rose from the impact of British colonial activity in South Asia since c. 1650. As we encounter these hybrid cultural forms, from portraits of East India Company officers in Mughal robes to Gothic Revival buildings in Bombay, we will examine the multidirectional process of negotiating and adapting different ways of making and seeing art, and ask how such interactions create spaces of dominance and resistance. Topics include cross-cultural, cross-media exchanges; formation of political, social, and religious identities; emergence of new audiences, patrons, institutions, and technology. This course will count as an “Advanced Seminar” for the HART Major or toward the “Non-Western” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Heeryoon Shin. (AXLE: P). 

HART 4960: Advanced Seminar: Art and Politics in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era.
This seminar will examine the relationship between art and politics in one of the most parlous periods in modern European history.  How did the French Revolution deconstruct and reconstruct the patronage system of the European ancien régime?  How were traditional iconographies redeployed for immediate political purposes, and what new visualities were invented?  When Napoleon took over the French state as dictator in 1799, how did his cultural programs redirect Revolutionary initiatives, and how did he “re-imperialize” patronage after the declaration of the French Empire in 1804?  Finally, what was the impact of the French art policies on the conquered and annexed states, above all in terms of national patrimony, the looting and confiscation of works of art, and the centralization represented by the Musée Napoléon established at the Louvre? This course will count as an “Advanced Seminar” for the HART Major or toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Christopher Johns. (AXLE: HCA).

Updated 10/5/2018

 

MAYMESTER AND SUMMER 2019 HISTORY OF ART COURSE OFFERINGS

Maymester 2019

HART 2722: Modern Art and Architecture in Paris (taught on location in Paris). Paris was the center of western modern art movements throughout the 19th century and until the mid-20th century. It became the exemplary modern city in Western Europe, and developed an extensive infrastructure of cultural institutions such as art academies, private galleries, and vast museums. The major movements of this period were represented by artists such as David, Ingres, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Monet and the other Impressionists; the post-Impressionists Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Seurat; and the Cubists Picasso and Braque. This list includes members of the Dada and Surrealist groups, leading into more international movements of radical abstraction, performance art, conceptual art, and post-modernism by the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Class periods will be spent touring sites in Paris, including the Eiffel Tower, the Musée d'Orsay, the Musée Picasso, two opera houses, a major department store, public parks, and the Centre Pompidou. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART major; HART Minor, ARCH Minor. [3] Leonard Folgarait (AXLE: HCA).

HART 3810: Exhibiting Historical Art: Exhibiting Art, Literature, and Culture in Cuba (taught on location in Cuba). This course intersects with the 13th Havana Biennial in Matanzas, Cuba for which Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, Cornelius Vanderbilt Endowed Chair and Professor of Fine Arts, is the Artistic Director. The Havana Biennial, established in 1984, focuses on artists from Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East to underscore the international aspect of contemporary art. The April 12-May 19, 2019 Biennial will be held in Havana, as has been the tradition, but it will also be held in expositions outside that city for the first time. We will study the selection of about thirty international artists (including American artists) that Campos-Pons has chosen to be shown in her hometown of Matanzas, as well as those who will exhibit in Cienfuegos. At the same time, we will study the history, religion, literature, and culture of Cuba, keeping in mind the traditions of art presses in Cuba, resulting in the Symposium of Alternative Presses, which will be concurrent with the biennial. We will focus on writers of the Cuban Revolution who authored mainly prose and poetry, and consider some of the Afro-Cuban religious manifestations typical of Cuban culture. We will travel to Havana, Matanzas, and Cienfuegos to tour the cities and artists’ projects and meet with artists, writers, religious practitioners, and other cultural promoters. This course will count as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. No credit for students who have completed HART 3810 offered on the same topic Spring 2019. [3] Vivien Fryd and William Luis (AXLE: HCA).

Summer Session 2

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Minor. [3] Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

 

Updated 11/7/2018