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Course Listings

 

Course Listings, Summer 2021 through Spring 2022

For the days and times that the following classes meet, please refer to the Schedule of Classes on YES.

See how these courses apply to the requirements toward the HART Major or Minor , or, toward the ARCH Major or Minor

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SUMMER 2021 HISTORY OF ART and ARCHITECTURE COURSE OFFERINGS

MAYMESTER

HART 1740W: Introduction to Design Studies.
Design encompasses us.  From the typeface in which these words are printed to the buildings that keep our classrooms comfortable to the forester-managed national parks that we visit in order to escape the artificial city, we inhabit an age in which everything on our planet is a product of human design.  And designers, born into a thoroughly designed world, continue to revise and recreate that world.  Indeed, the relationship between design and society are profoundly reciprocal. This class critically examines the exchange between the designed world of objects, images, and experiences, and the culture that creates, manipulates, and absorbs these designs. Our work together will lead to new questions and innovative ways of thinking about our material and immaterial worlds. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission; counts toward ARCH Major, Minor as a 1000-level course. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).  

 

SUMMER SESSION 2

HART 2325: Great Masters of the Italian Renaissance.
A roughly chronological introductory survey of the major developments in Italian Art from the late Gothic to the High Renaissance, ca. 1300-1520. Landmarks in painting, sculpture, and architecture in central Italy, focusing on Siena, Florence, and Rome. Trecento Sienese masters Duccio and the Lorenzetti; Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Botticelli, and Leonardo in Florence; and Michelangelo and Raphael in Rome. Tempera and fresco technique; civic, ecclesiastic, and domestic buildings; stylistic progression, context and meaning. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement for the HART Major; counts toward HART Minor, ARCH Major, ARCH Minor as an elective. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt (AXLE: INT).

 

FALL 2021 HISTORY OF ART and ARCHITECTURE COURSE OFFERINGS (Tentative)

Note that courses are arranged by Subject Area:  Introductory survey courses, First-Year Writing Seminars, 1000W courses, then courses in Global/Non-Western, Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, and Modern Art, followed by Elective courses and Advanced Seminars.

 

HART 1100: History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval Art.
 
An introduction, through lectures and readings, to the extraordinary range of works of art and architecture produced in the first 30,000 years of Western civilization up to about 1400--from the Prehistoric through Ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Medieval cultures. The first goal of this course is to enable students to apply the methods and vocabulary of art history in their thinking and writing, so that they will be able to analyze and compare the formal qualities of works of art. The second will be to deepen our understanding of the works we study by reading selected primary sources contemporary with the works of art, to learn something of their social, religious, and cultural circumstances. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Elizabeth Moodey. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. 

An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 1200: Arts of East Asia.
An exploration of the cultural traditions of East Asia--China, Japan, and Korea--from the 2nd millennium BCE to the 19th century CE through the visual arts. Architecture, painting, ceramics, and sculpture will be examined both as works collected and admired for their aesthetic qualities as well as examples of the culture in which they were produced. Considerations of style will be used to aid in answering questions regarding a work's commission, production, and social significance. Thus, the historical, religious, philosophical, and cultural background will form the framework of our study. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor as a 1000-level course. (Note: the “Non-Western” requirement for the HART major requires a 2000-level course or above, see below in course listings). [3] Tracy Miller. (AXLE: INT).

 

HART 1111-07: The Meaning of Modern Art. First-Year Writing Seminar.
This course will present art of the modern period, the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and ask of that art what it means, and how and why that meaning was produced. Why is modern art so difficult to understand? Why does it look so unrealistic, and why is its meaning so hidden? Why is it so often thought to be made by unskilled and unbalanced people? This course will approach these questions seriously and attempt to answer them for the general student interested in art and in modern times. To understand modern art, we must study modern history and society. We have to examine what sort of world the artists lived in that caused their art to look as it does. Examples of the art to be studied range from Impressionist paintings of the nineteenth century to Pokémon and music videos of today. The style of these images will be studied as a result of the kind of world in which they were made. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Leonard Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 1111-14: Art and Controversy in 20th-Century America. First-Year Writing Seminar.
Art often mirrors culture, but what happens when art does not reflect the views of the society or culture that produces it? We will study recent and historical controversies concerning the visual arts that address questions of government funding, the role of public art, censorship, decency, morality, and issues of diversity and inclusion. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: US).

 

HART 1111-17: New York City Architecture: Form and Fantasy. First-Year Writing Seminar. 
This course provides an introduction to architectural history and criticism and focuses on the history of the built environment of New York City as imagined and realized. Students will explore approaches to understanding the aesthetics and the operations of the built environment, and will trace the development of the city, as understood through its constructed environment, from European contact in the seventeenth century to the present. The course will consider architectural trends, urban planning, technologies of construction and transportation, the development of neighborhoods, the design and construction of urban parks, as well as impact of class and race, immigration, and global trade on patterns of urban life.  Discussion and readings will also consider the ambiguities of preservation and the difficulties of confirming and representing historical fact. Will count toward the HART Major, Minor or ARCH Major, Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: US). 

 

RLST 1111-13/HART 1111-99: Renaissance Art and Politics. First-Year Writing Seminar.
In this course we will examine the history of the Renaissance in Florence, Rome, and Nuremberg, three major cultural centers that underwent profound transformations in art, religion, and political structure. We will study politics and religion as a basis for interpreting the functions of Renaissance art. Above all, we will examine how art and religious culture contested and created political power and authority. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. [3] David Price. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2120: The Arts of Korea.
The history of Korea from ancient times to the present through the lens of art and culture. This interdisciplinary course examines intersections of art, religion, and politics in Korea, as well as Korea’s interactions with China and Japan. We will discuss: the formation of the early Korean kingdoms and the transmission of Buddhism; the role of female artists and patrons; the pre-modern Korean porcelain industry and trade in the trans-regional context; the influences of Buddhist and Confucian thought over Korean aesthetics and art production in pre-modern times; visual culture and politics under Japanese colonial rule; modern and contemporary Korean art and its interaction with the global art world; the relationship between art and state in the North Korean regime; and the interaction between contemporary art and K-pop. Students will have opportunities to examine art objects at the Vanderbilt University Fine Arts Gallery, and learn how to apply interdisciplinary methods to analyze visual materials. No background in Asian/Korean studies or art history is necessary for the successful completion of this course. This course will count toward the “Global/Non-Western” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Heeryoon Shin. (AXLE: INT). 

 

HART 2815: Digital Heritage, Methods and Practice: The Chinese Temple. 
This class will focus on digital approaches to artwork, architecture and built assemblages (monasteries and temple complexes) and spiritual landscapes of premodern China. Class time will be divided between substance and practice: 1) We will study the architecture, setting, and decoration of temple buildings in China 2) We will learn about the underlying theory of heritage studies, international translation practices for technical terminology, and gain practical experience in data curation for cultural heritage sites. Students will gain experience in research methods relating to the technical terminology used to describe individual buildings and temple sites, including structural and stylistic concepts and their translation and interpretation for different cultural environments--highly desirable skills in current art and architectural history, museum work, and heritage studies. Final projects will focus on studies of form, subject, iconography, and the cultural and religious contexts of timber frame architecture, architectural ceramics, and the materiality of temples in the Chinese context. Pre-requisite: 1 year of Chinese language (or the equivalent).  This course will count toward the “Global/Non-Western” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor; ARCH Major, ARCH Minor. [3] Tracy Miller. (AXLE: HCA). 

 

HART 3320: Early Renaissance Florence. 
Major masters and works from Early Renaissance Florence during the Quattrocento, i.e., the Fifteenth Century, ca. 1400-1500. We will primarily consider works of painting and sculpture that are part of larger decorative programs, with the inclusion of architectural principles and monuments when appropriate to our topic of discussion. Key masters to be considered during the semester, time permitting, will include Giotto di Bondone, Lorenzo Ghiberti, Donatello, Filippo Brunelleschi, Leonbattista Alberti, Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Andrea del Verrocchio and the young Leonardo da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, Domenico del Ghirlandaio and the young Michelangelo Buonarroti. In class lecture and discussion, there will be particular emphasis upon stylistic progression and connoisseurship, iconographic interpretation and meaning, the role of patronage and audience, original physical and cultural context, and the Italian Renaissance workshop tradition. This course will count toward the "Renaissance and Baroque" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

  

HART 2720: Modern Architecture.
 
An in-depth study of developments in the history of architecture from the early 19th century to the present. Works of architecture will be considered as objects of intellectual and physical labor that can be studied for information about the historical period of their production. In addition to buildings, we will take architecture to include theory, drawings, unbuilt architecture, city planning, and ways in which architectural ideas are used in non-architectural media. Formal analysis and a social historical approach will address questions such as: Why was this building constructed? Whose purpose did it serve? How was it received in its own time? How does a consideration of its style help to answer the previous questions? Emphasis will be placed on relationships between style and content, and in turn to general historical conditions. The course intends to demonstrate that architectural production, as other forms of human behavior, can yield meaningful information about the historical process. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor. [3] Matthew Worsnick. (AXLE: HCA).

  

HART 2750: African American Art. 

A survey of painting, sculpture, photography, print, and film from the late 18th-century Colonial Era to the present. Organized chronologically and thematically, the course will explore issues concerning artistic identity and the need for representation, gender, the politics of display, political activism and art, and the influence of European and African art practices on African American artists. For example, we will consider Kara Walker's controversial depictions of the antebellum South, examine the emergence of the "New Negro" during the Harlem Renaissance, and discuss art-historical precedents for works like Jay-Z's 2013 "Picasso Baby" performance piece, among many other topics. By the end of the semester students will possess a critical understanding of the relationship between race and representation as well as the impact of historical, cultural, racial, and political forces on African American cultural production. Not open to students who have earned credit for HART 1750W without permission. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART major, HART Minor. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: P).

 

HART 3364W: Art of the Court of Burgundy. 

The Valois dukes of Burgundy (1364-1477) ruled an increasing collection of lucrative territories beginning with one duchy in eastern France and expanding into the southern Netherlands. Along the way they developed a reputation for luxury and display that eclipsed the rest of Europe's courts, commissioning architecture, sculpture, precious metalwork, painting, tapestries, and manuscripts from artists such as Claus Sluter, Jan van Eyck, and Rogier van der Weyden. The visual arts are our primary focus, but we will also consider the religious, political, and social forces that shaped the arts at court. This course will count as an Advanced Seminar or toward the “Medieval” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Elizabeth Moodey. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 3757W: Women in Architecture. 

Women’s contributions to the built environment as architects, patrons, critics, and social reformers, primarily in the 19th and 20th centuries. Perspectives of feminism, gender, race, and sexuality studies. Julia Morgan, Eileen Gray, Charlotte Perriand, Denise Scott Brown, and Zaha Hadid. This course will count as an Advanced Seminar or toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major, HART Minor; ARCH Major, ARCH Minor. [3] Kevin Murphy. (AXLE: P).

 

SPRING 2022 HISTORY OF ART COURSE OFFERINGS (Tentative)

HART 1105: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern Art. 
An introductory survey of Western art history from the Renaissance to the Modern period, considering primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture. Please note that the chronological and thematic range of material covered will vary somewhat depending on the instructor. HART 1105 is intended to provide a historical understanding of the major artistic movements within the Western visual tradition, and to encourage students to develop a literate and critical eye. Attention is given to works of specific artists, as well as cultural factors that affect the visual arts from production to reception. Counts toward HART Major, Minor, and ARCH Major, Minor as a 1000-level course. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: HCA). 

   

HART 1285W: Introduction to Medieval Art.
The period we call the Middle Ages was once considered the murky space between antiquity and modernity, but it includes a variety of distinctive cultures and their achievements in works as diverse as tiny illuminated manuscripts, massive stone cathedrals, tapestries woven with gold, fine metalwork for devotion and adornment, and sculpture for the dead.  This course looks primarily at the art of Western Europe, with attention to Byzantine and Islamic art, from about the third to the fifteenth century.  The visual arts are our primary focus, but we will also consider the religious, political, and social forces that shaped them, and the people who created and used them.  Although we will be using works of art and art-historical articles as subjects, students will become familiar with forms and conventions that will be useful for academic writing in general, especially in the humanities. Will count toward the HART Major or Minor as an elective with departmental permission. (Note: the “Medieval” requirement for the HART major requires a 2000-level course or above). [3] Elizabeth Moodey. (AXLE: INT).

   

HART 3112: The Arts of China during the Liao-Song Period, 907-1279 C.E.
Developments in the art and architecture of China during the Liao-Song period, long considered a pinnacle of artistic culture in East Asia, in the context of politics, religion, and aesthetics. By the end of the tenth century a divided China had been unified but there were two Sons of Heaven—emperors divinely bestowed the right to rule—ruling two vast dynasties: the Liao and the Song. Emperors of the Song dynasty instituted a civil service exam system that emphasized a mastery of the classics of literature, philosophy, and history for employment in the court. In a time of prosperity and wealth, this new class of intellectuals began collecting antiquities and experimenting with pictorial representation to critique the political culture of the present. The artistic production of this magnificent period thus set the standard for painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture across East Asia for centuries to come. This course will examine that process, and why the arts of this period came to be so highly esteemed in the history of Chinese art. This course will count toward the “Global/Non-Western” area requirement for the HART Major, HART Minor; and ARCH Major, ARCH Minor. [3] Tracy Miller. (AXLE: INT).

 

HART 2230/CLAS 2210: Late Classical Greek and Hellenistic Art and Architecture.
Sculpture, vase painting, architecture, and the minor arts from after the Parthenon to the Roman Empire. Media that developed significantly in this period, such as wall painting and mosaic. This course will count toward the “Ancient” area requirement for the HART Major, HART Minor; and ARCH Major, ARCH Minor. [3] Betsey Robinson. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2285: Medieval Art. 

An introduction to the major and minor arts of later medieval Europe in the West from ca. 1000- ca. 1400 CE. Lectures will provide a chronological armature for the course, readings will suggest themes beyond the stylistic development of Romanesque and Gothic art, and primary sources will allow us a glimpse of the concerns of medieval people. The patronage of this period is overwhelmingly Christian, and our focus will be on Western Europe, but we will also consider the impact of the art of the Byzantine Church, and the art that emerged with the coming of Islam in the 7th century. This course will count toward the "Medieval" area requirement for the HART Major, HART Minor; ARCH Major, ARCH Minor. [3] Elizabeth Moodey. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2362: Fifteenth-Century Northern European Art.  
A survey of the major developments in the painting and sculpture of Northern Europe, including the Netherlands and France, from the mid- to late fourteenth through the fifteenth century. Our focus will be on Netherlandish Painting, and key artists to be considered include the Limbourg Brothers, Claus Sluter, Jan van Eyck, Robert Campin (the Master of Flémalle), Rogier van der Weyden, Dieric Bouts, Petrus Christus, Hugo van der Goes, Geertgen tot sint Jans, Hans Memling, Gerard David, and Hieronymus Bosch. Our analysis of the period will progress roughly chronologically, as we consider specific artists and regional schools. In class lecture and discussion, there will be particular emphasis upon stylistic progression, iconographic interpretation and meaning, the role of patronage and audience, original physical and cultural context, the workshop tradition, and scientific analysis. This course will count toward the “Renaissance and Baroque” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Sheri Shaneyfelt. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2600: Eighteenth-Century Art.  
The history of European painting, sculpture, and printmaking from the Late Baroque era to the rise of Neoclassicism, ca. 1675–1775. Geographical focus on Italy and France. Artists include Maratti, Rusconi, Carriera, Tiepolo, Watteau, Chardin, Fragonard, and others. This course will count toward the "Modern" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Johns. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2710: Twentieth-Century European Art.  

A survey of major movements and artists, with examples from painting, architecture, prints, sculpture, performance and conceptual art, music, and cinema. Emphasis is placed on a close examination of the stylistic elements of the artworks, with that analysis contextualized within the social, political, and economic dynamics of the time in which they were made. Instruction places a heavy emphasis on the ideological nature of art and on its role as a major indicator of its time and place. This course will count toward the "Modern" area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Leonard Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 2755: Women in Art since 1850.  
Historical survey of European and American women artists and their artistic contributions from 1850 to the present. Arranged chronologically and thematically, we will consider how gender identity influenced the circumstances under which women artists work and examine the forms their art took. We will begin by learning about second-wave feminism in the 1970s and the concurrent development of feminist art history. Building on this theoretical foundation we will examine how employing a feminist lens alters the way we look at art produced throughout history and even challenges dominant notions of art itself. A priority is placed upon the visual analysis of specific art objects and an attentive, critical engagement with key texts. This course will count toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Rebecca VanDiver. (AXLE: P). 

 

HART 3890/AMER 3890: Selected Topics: The Art of Social Justice.
Course Description forthcoming. 
This course will count toward the "Modern" area requirement or as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] Kevin Murphy, Leah Lowe. (No AXLE credit).

  

HART 2775: History of Prints.
Woodcut, engraving, etching, and lithography from the fifteenth to the twentieth century. Scientific, devotional, ornamental, and documentary functions. Dürer, Piranesi, Hogarth, Daumier, and Kollwitz. Advances in technique and marketing, relationship to fine art, and place in popular culture. This course will count as an Elective for the HART Major; HART Minor. [3] David Price. (AXLE: HCA).

 

HART 3610W: Art and Politics in Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe, 1785-1830.
Art patronage, politics, and propaganda of the ancien régime, French Revolution, reign of Napoleon Bonaparte, and Bourbon Restoration. French art policies on national patrimony, looting, and the confiscation of artworks; cultural centralization at the Musée du Louvre. Painting, sculpture, printmaking, and decorative arts. David, Ingres, Gérard, Canova, Géricault. This course will count as an Advanced Seminar or toward the “Modern” area requirement for the HART Major, HART Minor. [3] Christopher Johns. (AXLE: HCA).

  

HART 3712W: Surrealism.
A close examination of the major themes, images, and artists of Surrealism, from its origins in France to its international proliferation.  A wide range of media will be considered, from painting to cinema.  Instruction will stress seminar-style discussion, with emphasis on analysis of the formal qualities of the artworks and on their ability to articulate the ideological dimension of the place and time of their making. [3] Folgarait. (AXLE: HCA).

 

 

 

Updated 4/21/2021