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Current & Future Courses

 

Course Offerings Fall 2019

German Undergraduate Courses in German

GER 1101: Elementary German I 
This course guides students in acquiring the fundamentals of German for meaningful communication in an authentic cultural context.  Students will develop basic language skills through practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Topics of discussion include hobbies and activities, your daily routine, your family, your studies, food, your living environment, the regions of Germany, and more.  Students will begin to interpret and discuss German texts from a variety of media to enhance their knowledge of German, Austrian, and Swiss cultures. No prerequisite (for beginners). [3]
MWF 9:10-10:00 (Staff) | 10:10 – 11:00 (Staff) | 11:10-12:00 (Staff) | 12:10-1 (TBD)

GER 1102: Elementary German II 
This course continues to guide students in acquiring the fundamentals of German for meaningful communication in an authentic cultural context.  Students will develop basic language skills through practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Topics of discussion include travel, education, health, entertainment, shopping, and Germany’s role in the European Union.  Students will read and discuss German texts from a variety of media to enhance their knowledge of German, Austria, and Swiss cultures.  Prerequisite GER 1101 or equivalent. [3]
MWF 10:10-11:00 (Staff) | 11:10-12 (Staff)

GER 2201: Intermediate German I
This course guides students in the development of intermediate German linguistic and cultural proficiency through practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and discussions of German culture. Emphasis is placed on developing communicative skills, reading short texts, writing essays.  Topics of discussion include German history, culture, film, and current events.  The course includes a comprehensive review of German grammar, with emphasis on more advanced structures. Prerequisite GER 1102 or equivalent. [3]
MWF 10:10-11:00 (Staff) | 12:10-1:00 (Schade)

GER 2202: Intermediate German II
This course continues to guide students in the development of intermediate German linguistic and cultural proficiency through practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and discussions of German culture. Emphasis is placed on developing communicative skills, reading short texts, writing essays.  Topics of discussion include the geography and culture of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, German-language literature, and current events.  The course includes a comprehensive review of German grammar and prepares students for upper-level courses in German. Prerequisite GER 2201 or equivalent. [3]
MWF 9:10-10:00 (Staff) | 12:10-1 (Staff)

GER 3201: Advanced German I
This course guides students in acquiring advanced German skills through a close study of contemporary German culture, politics, and society.  Materials include current German-language news articles, literary texts, films, television, and music.  Topics of discussion include post-Wall Germany, memory and memorialization, migration and Leitkultur, and Germany’s role in the EU.  Students contribute to a blog, write essays, give presentations, and write a short research paper in German.  The course is required for German majors and is a prerequisite for students entering upper-level German-language courses. Prerequisite GER 2202 or equivalent. [3]
MWF 11:10-12 (TBD)

GER 4555: Topics in German Studies | Berlin
This seminar explores Germany’s capital and one of the world’s most dynamic cities, Berlin.  Students will read literary and historical texts, view films and visual art.  Topics include the Cold War, the division of Berlin, Germany under Hitler, Weimar-Era Berlin, architecture, gender and sexuality, migration, Expressionism, and public art.  The course is designed to strengthen reading, writing, and analytical skills.  All materials and discussions are in German.  Prerequisites: GER 3201 or 3202. [3]  (INT)
MW 11-12:15 (Schade)

GER 4558: Business German
National differences do not disappear from a globalized world, rather they become internationally relevant. This course explores the distinct character of German business practices. We will examine German attitudes toward capital and labor, toward the role of the state and non-governmental organizations in structuring commercial relationships, toward environmental and other concerns effecting business practices in Germany, in order to identify differences that impact communication between German-speakers and non-German-speakers in business settings. The course will emphasize aural, oral, and written skills. We will investigate the role of German corporations in the United States, German finance in the European Union, and German capital in global conflict zones. In addition, the course will use practical exercises to familiarize students with business practices in German-speaking countries: advertising and marketing strategies, letters, vitae, phone calls, and personal interviews. Readings and discussions in German. Prerequisite: GER 2202.
TR 9:35-10:50 (McFarland) 

German Undergraduate Courses in English

GER 1111-03: First-Year Writing Seminar | Pioneers of Literary Modernism
Pioneers of Literary Modernism: Brecht, Kafka, Rilke. Various literary movements arose in German-speaking countries in the early twentieth century, including Symbolism, Expressionism, and Surrealism. While Hermann Hesse and Thomas Mann preferred to write in the traditional style of the nineteenth century, others favored literary experiments that have become influential for later writers: Franz Kafka with his enigmatic tales of modern man's battles against incomprehensible forces, Bertolt Brecht with his epic plays addressing their audiences' political consciousness, and Rainer Maria Rilke with his symbolist poems reflecting the complexity of existence. Knowledge of German is not required. [3] (HCA)
MWF 2-3 (TBD)

GER 2441: Great German Works in English 
What are “great works?” Why do they endure over centuries? What is their contemporary relevance? These are some of the questions that will inform our readings of German authors from 1750 to the present. We will explore changing notions of the subject and its relations to community; the foundations of modern society; the relationship of culture and history; and shifting ideas of the nation and national identity. Our focus will be on close readings of texts as well as on the historical and social context. Readings will include works by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Heinrich von Kleist, Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, Christa Wolf, and Herta Müller. Knowledge of German is not required; all texts will be available in English translation.
TR 2:35-3:50 (McFarland)

GER 2570: The Holocaust (JS 3100)
The history of the Holocaust: It's origins, development, and its legacy in the context of Germany and European history. [3] (INT) (Reserved for 5 German majors/minors)
TR 1:10-2:25 (Joskowicz)

GER 2581: Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (PHIL 2104)
A study of selected themes and writings from nineteenth-century European philosophers. [3] (INT)
TR 9:35 – 10:50 (Ng)

Graduate Courses

GER 5310: Foreign Language Learning and Teaching
Principles and practices of teaching a second language with concentration on recent interactive and communicative models of foreign language instruction. Classroom observations, journal writing, development of materials, and a small action research project. [3] Same as SLS 7030.
M 3:10 – 5:30 (Schade)

GER 7102: Foundations II: Theories of Literary and Cultural Analysis
Key texts on modern thought, media, and the human condition. GER 7102 is one of three mandatory foundation courses for Ph.D. candidates in the German Ph.D. program and a prerequisite for taking the Preliminary Exam. [3]
TR 2:35-3:50 (Koepnick)

GER 8203: Seminar: Twentieth Century Literature | German Modernism/Modernity
This graduate seminar will explore the various movements that came to define the fin de siècle period as well as international Modernism. The course will examine the socio-political developments that changed modern life across the globe and that gave form to the diverse crosscurrents that exerted an enormous influence on philosophers (Nietzsche, Simmel), writers (Fontane, Musil, Schnitzler), and poets (Holz, Rilke, George) of the time. The readings for the course will also include a number of now classic works on the period, such as M. H. Abrams studies on European Romanticism, Matei Calinescu’s Five Faces of Modernity, Charles Baudelaire’s The  Painter of Modern Life, Walter Benjamin’s Paris, The Capital of the Nineteenth Century, and Friedrich Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy.
W 3:10 – 5:30 (Werner)

Russian Courses in Russian

RUS 1101: First-Year Russian I
This course guides students in acquiring the fundamentals of Russian for meaningful communication in an authentic cultural context. Students will develop basic language skills through practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Topics of discussion include hobbies and activities, your daily routine, your family, your studies, food, your living environment, the regions of Russia, and more. Students will begin to interpret and discuss Russian texts from a variety of media to enhance their knowledge of Russian culture. No prerequisite (for beginners). [4] (INT)
TWRF 11:10-12 (Johnson)

RUS 2201: Second Year Russian I
This course guides students in the development of intermediate Russian linguistic and cultural proficiency through practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and discussions of Russian culture. Emphasis is placed on developing communicative skills, reading short texts, writing essays. Topics of discussion include Russian history, culture, film, and current events. The course includes a comprehensive review of Russian grammar, with emphasis on more advanced structures. Prerequisite RUSS 1102 or equivalent. [4] (INT)
MTWR 12:10-1 (Gorski MTW/Johnson R)

RUS 3306: Advanced Russian Language through Culture and Literature. Literature, history, aesthetics, and politics in Russian-speaking cultures. May be repeated for credit if there is no duplication in topic. Prerequisite: RUSS 2202 or equivalent. [3] (INT)  
MWF 11-12 (Zhernokleyev)

Russian Courses in English

RUS 1111-01: First-Year Writing Seminar | Classic Russian Short Novels
In the nineteenth century, Russia witnessed an unprecedented explosion of literary and intellectual activity, a renaissance yielding some of the masterpieces of world literature. Concentrating on short classic novels, we will examine works by the most prominent authors of this period, putting special emphasis on Russia’s unique handling of the sudden influx of European philosophy and culture. Knowledge of Russian is not required. [3] (HCA)  
MWF 1-2 (Zhernokleyev)

RUS 1874: Russian Fairy Tales
Russia has one of the most vibrant fairy tale traditions in the world, best known for such creative and eccentric figures as Baba Yaga, a cannibal witch, who lives in a hut on chicken’s legs, and Koschei, an evil wizard whose death is hidden in an egg under an oak tree. We will begin this course with an overview of Russia’s distinctive fairy tales, discussing them in terms of their content, context and cultural significance, as well as applying approaches such as structuralism and feminism. We will then explore famous adaptations of fairy tales, plots and themes by Tolstoy, Nabokov, Bulgakov, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky and others, tracing the path of the fairy tale from Pagan Rus to Putin’s Russia. Knowledge of Russian is not required.
TR 11-12:25 (Denischenko)

RUS 2435: Leo Tolstoy
Early stories and post-conversion novellas. Realist masterpiece Anna Karenina and its film adaptations. Moral inquiry in Tolstoy's writing. Philosophical and psychological exploration into the themes of love, adultery, religion, work, and art. Knowledge of Russian is not required. [3] (INT)
MWF 2-3 (Zhernokleyev)

RUS 2273 W : Russian Science Fiction
Russia has one of the greatest and most diverse science fiction traditions in the world. It is famous for such masterpieces as Andrei Tarkovsky’s space-age film Solaris, the philosophical “hard science fiction” novels of the Strugatsky Brothers, and Yakov Protazanov’s Aelita, the communist epic that inspired Fritz Lang’s Metropolis. This course will offer an overview of the best of Russian science fiction, discussing its significance for various media ranging from literature and film to video games and science fiction magazines. Knowledge of Russian is not required. [3] (INT)
MW 4:5:15 (Gorski)

RUS 2745: The Russian and East European Avant-garde(s)
Introduction to experimental art-both verbal and visual-in Russia and Eastern Europe in the 1910s-1930s. Exploration of Cubism, Futurism, Supremacism, Constructivism, Surrealism through the avant-garde's engagement with various genres and media: the manifesto, performance, sound and image poetry, painting, photomontage, artist's book, magazine, and film. Knowledge of Russian is not required. [3] (INT)
TR 2:35-3:50 (Denischenko)

Courses Taught Outside of the Department

CMAP 8003: Media and Society
This seminar provides a rich set of concepts and perspectives to think about the role of media in modern society. It addresses different political and economic frameworks of media production and distribution; the role of authorship and copyright in an era of digital distribution and sampling; the tensions between privacy and publicness in a time of advanced data collection, marketing, and surveillance; the use of media in past and present political decision making; the role of different media in the negotiation of gender and sexual difference; media and disability; media and the politics of power, body, knowledge, and identity. This seminar also focuses on the recent rise of social networking and the ubiquity of our media encounters; the transformation of entertainment industries and academic institutions in times of online connectivity and digital data management; and general questions of media accessibility in a globalized society. Students will familiarize themselves with critical tools to assess the impact of social processes onto past and present media landscapes; as much as they will learn how to map the impact of various older and newer media onto their respective political, economic, and cultural contexts
W 6:30-9:30 (Zeller)

HIST 8050: History from the Margin
This seminar will explore how historians working on marginalized groups and regions make broader arguments about society and politics. We will consider how scholars challenge and rethink historical narratives by beginning from the perspectives of marginal communities, by analyzing peripheral regions, and by integrating sources created from the margins of society. The course will interrogate how such approaches establish new conceptual frameworks, methodologies, and questions.  Although the majority of the texts will come from cultural theorists and historians of Europe (broadly-defined), the methods and the problems we address are common to non-European historiographies as well, and graduate students in all areas are welcome.
T 9:10 – 12 pm (Greble, Joskowicz)