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Spring 2017 Course Descriptions

Please verify course selections in YES to see the complete selection of course dates and times. You will need to meet with your adviser in person before your registration appointment window, at which time, your adviser will release an electronic academic hold on your account so that you may register. E-mail your adviser for an appointment. The name of your adviser, as well as the time of your registration appointment window is listed on your YES landing page. Admittance to Honors sections and 3200-level writing workshops are subject to instructor approval. Please refer to the individual course listings for instructions.

please click here for a list of courses that satisfy the (History, Diverse Perspectives, Approach, Program II Creative Writing) requirements for English Majors and Minors. 

For more detailed information about the English Department, please click here for pages from the 2015-2016 Vanderbilt College of Arts & Science / English Catalog.

  Spring 2017 English Courses and Descriptions

1000-Level Courses
2000-Level Courses
3000-Level Courses
4000-Level Courses



1000-Level Courses:


Engl. 1100.01 – Composition: “The Industrial Wedding Complex”

Stephanie Straub
TR – 8:10-9:25
The average American wedding now costs more than $25,000. How did this once modest ceremony transform into a lavish, expensive affair and spawn a massive multi-million-dollar industry? Critically examine the cultural and economic forces shaping the contemporary American wedding as you simultaneously hone your skills as a writer. We’ll study a variety of approaches to writing, brainstorming, and composition. By the end of the semester, you will have produced a fifteen-to-twenty-page writing portfolio consisting of works in at least four different genres.

English 1111.10 – First-Year Writing Seminar: “Shakespeare’s Legacy”
Kathryn Schwarz
TR – 4:00-5:15
Shakespeare died in 1616, but was not hailed as the supreme exemplar of English poetic genius for over a century. This course will examine the process through which Shakespeare became an icon of literary accomplishment, drawing on fascinating responses to his works. We will read several of Shakespeare’s plays and poems, study commentary across the centuries, examine adaptations including novels and films, and trace Shakespearean citations in a range of cultural contexts. We will neither applaud nor question Shakespeare’s poetic genius, but rather appreciate its evolution its evolution as a phenomenon.

Engl. 1111.19 – First-Year Writing Seminar: “Growing up Latino/Latina”
Candice Amich
MWF – 9:10-10:00
What does it mean to “grow up Latino/a” in the multicultural United States? In this course we will survey a broad range of cultural texts that provocatively and poignantly address the issues of language, education, race, class and gender that influence the development of Latino/a children and adolescents. We will pay special attention to coming-of-age stories that explore the psychological and political dimensions of encountering cultural difference and responding to the pressures of assimilation. The short stories, memoirs, poems, journalism, films, and video performances we will watch and read challenge their audiences to recognize the rich differences that define the Latino/a community in the United States.

Engl. 1111.22 – First-Year Writing Seminar: “More than Mr. Darcy: The Life and Works of Jane Austen”
Adam Miller
TR – 4:00-5:15
As a woman and a novelist, Jane Austen the novelist offers students an excellent personal and academic model. Much of her fiction, indeed the course of her own life, turn on the acquisition of self-knowledge, sound judgement, and independent thought—qualities essential to living a good life as well as being a good writer. By reading selected letters and four novels—Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Sense and Sensibility—we will explore the world of the woman and her work in their historical, cultural, and biographical contexts. In doing so, we will attempt to answer questions such as the following: What’s the big deal about Pemberley? Who is the real villain in Emma Woodhouse’s story? Who was Jane Austen’s lost love, why did she cancel her engagement and what explains the years of silence in her writing? And what is the basis for her continued relevance? We will study her works as both literary texts and as examples of successful composition while trying to gain an understanding of their historical, cultural, and biographical contexts.

Engl. 1111.46 – First-Year Writing Seminar: “Futures in the Past”
Michael Alijewicz
TR – 4:00-5:15
This course analyzes written plans, policies, and diagrams from both an early modern (1450-1688) and contemporary (20th and 21st century) perspective. By comparing both periods, we work to define the written style(s) of planning in the past while interrogating how we currently use language and writing to navigate potential futures. Alongside plans from both fiction and non-fiction, including Macbeth, Margaret Cavendish's Blazing World, Bartleby the Scrivener, and modern Protest literature, we will also consider encounters with planning in our own lives on campus, such as the architectural designs behind the Commons and Central Library.

Engl. 1210W.01 – Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: “Monsters in Fiction”
Justin Quarry
TR – 9:35-10:50
In this course, we will explore portrayals of various monsters—both realistic and fantastic—in fictions ranging from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries and analyze the elements of fiction used to illuminate them and in turn the societal anxieties and desires in the midst of which they appear.  Over our months together, we will attempt to define, and redefine, what, or who, exactly, a “monster” is and what makes such a creature simultaneously horrifying and fascinating, and we will examine novels, graphic novels, and short stories in order to determine the terms by which so-called monsters are understood and described, and what beyond the norm these creatures represent, both literally and metaphorically, in each encounter.
Moreover, the aim of this course is to teach you to think critically about literature, and so we also will devote a significant amount of time to focusing on the writing process by way of close reading, discussion, and writing assignments.  Throughout the semester, you will practice analyzing and critiquing our selected literary works in three essays as well as several reading responses and in-class writing assignments, each intended to help you more clearly and more persuasively present your arguments by basing them on textual evidence.

Engl. 1210W.02 – Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: “Putting Identity on the Table: Reading Food in Fiction”
Max Baumkel
TR – 1:10-2:25
What can food tell us about our culture, our history, our future, and ourselves? You will work on honing the skills of critical analysis and academic as well as personal writing while you explore themes around sexuality, race, gender, class, and nationality as they emerge from novels in which food is central to the narrative. You will develop three formal papers based on novels such as Zami: A New Spelling of my Name by Audre Lorde and Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel, along with a creative final project. We will end the semester with the skills to write essays in the genre of personal narrative, close reading, and research, along with the ability to write entertaining and informative pieces for a web-based audience.

Engl. 1210W.03 – Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: “Who Do You Think You Are?: Growing Up in the Bildungsroman”
Claudia Ludwig
TR – 8:10-9:25
What does it mean to grow up and how is the act of growing up represented in literature? This course will focus on the genre of bildungsroman, tracing the evolution of characters as they transition from childhood to adulthood. Texts for this course may include, Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones, Never Let Me Go by Kazou Ishiguro, Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson, The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi, and Who Do You Think You Are? by Alice Munro. Grades for this course will be determined by three formal essays, reading responses, and in-class participation. By the end of the course not only will you know more about the bildungsroman genre, but you will also be a more confident academic writer and participant in class discussions.

Engl. 1210W.05 – Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: “Asian American Women’s Fiction”
Piyali Bhattacharya
MW – 2:35-3:50
In this class, we will read work by Asian American female novelists such as Amy Tan, Bharati Mukherjee, Jean Kwok, Jhumpa Lahiri, Bich Minh Nguyen, Bushra Rehman, Catherine Chung, Tanwi Nandini Islam, and Ruth Ozeki. Through critical and close readings of these texts, we will examine what it means to develop cultural and political identities through fiction. We will also examine how class, race, and immigration status affect the identity politics of various kinds of Asian American communities, and what part art plays in sharpening and minimizing those divides. In each session, we will particularly discuss how the gender of the author and the gender/sexuality of the characters play a role in the development of the story in addition to playing a role in the work's critical reception. We will think through what it means to write and read "women's fiction," and "women's ethnic fiction," and we will thoroughly examine the effect these authors have had in the world of Asian American literature specifically. Finally, we will use these texts as a springboard to examine how these issues play out in our own local communities, and how we can and must contribute to discussions on these topics through continuous and critical awareness of the art, literature, and media that is created by, about, and around us.

Engl. 1210W.06 – Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: “From Their Ashes: Notions of Community and Futurity after Catastrophe”
Kirsten Mendoza
TR – 11:00-12:15
When disasters confound our communities, how do we remember and explain these exorbitant losses? Students will read works of fiction spanning the 17th to the 21st centuries on catastrophes like the Great Plague, The Battle of Somme, and WWII. Our survey will lead us to dabble in the dystopian futures imagined in the literature of Margaret Atwood and others. Your grades will be comprised by daily written responses, an annotated bibliography, and three formal papers with revisions. By the end of the semester, students should feel confident in their abilities to pursue nagging questions and to communicate their ideas in poignant prose.

Engl. 1220W.01 – Drama: Forms and Techniques: “Performing Blackness”
Marianne VanDevere
TR – 9:35-10:50
How has popular culture influenced both social and personal understandings of blackness? We will examine the ways in which identities are created by reading texts from black playwrights. We will analyze texts in discussion and written work. We will wrestle with questions that have no simple answers and will produce difficult (and, at times, uncomfortable) questions of our own—questions that invite us to think in new ways about performance of gender, class, sexuality, and race. Assessments include participation, daily homework, three formal essays, and a presentation. This course will further develop your critical reading and writing skills.

Engl. 1220W.02 – Drama: Forms and Techniques:“Oh My Goth: Performance, Aesthetics, and (Counter) Culture”
Lauren Mitchell
TR – 1:10-2:25
Let’s talk about what’s creepy, and why. How do people “perform” counter-culture? This class will consider the persistent role of the goth aesthetic from bone-collecting, medical museums, to music videos, to the fashion celebrated by Hot Topic and “scream-o” by routing it through traditions of theatrical performance. In addition to reading plays such as Macbeth, Equus, and Dracula, we will incorporate music videos, cinematic performances, and some theories of acting into our conversation. Students are (very) welcome to incorporate interdisciplinary topics from their majors into their four essays.

Engl. 1220W.03 – Drama: Forms and Techniques:“The Fourth Wall Down and the Family Exposed”
Judy Klass
MWF – 3:10-4:00
In this course, we will look at how plays have changed over the last 2,500 years, and how theatrical conventions like the Green chorus and the Shakespearean soliloquy have given way to other techniques and approaches. We will look at Aristotle’s ideas about the unities, and about what constitutes true tragedy: ideas about katharsis and hamartia—or the “fatal flaw,” as it is sometimes translated. Aristotle argues that plays should either be tragedies or comedies, but not a mixture of the two forms. We’ll look at the plot arcs associated with both kinds of plays—and at plays that break his rules and mix forms—and discuss his ideas about suitable heroes and the time frame for plays. We will talk about how influential his ideas from the Poetics remains.
The theme running through the plays selected for this course might be described as: “the fourth wall down and the family exposed.” Theater, as opposed to film, is a form with obvious spatial limitations, and that can create a claustrophobic atmosphere on-stage—but such an atmosphere is ideal for an exploration of certain families in which characters feel trapped, stuck with the people they live with, doomed by blood ties, and perhaps by economic circumstances—or by a need to connect, to inflict harm, to be affirmed, forgiven, or vindicated. Audiences observing any group of characters are voyeurs, in a sense, but film audiences are more like peeping Toms, watching a parade of visual images go by, while theater audiences are more like eavesdroppers, listening as complicated arguments and conversations reveal things about the speakers. Moreover, there is far more room in a play than in a film to let a scene play out, over time, and to peel away the layers of the characters and of their relationships as one might peel an onion; the unlikely mix of love, hate, anger, guilt, resentment, admiration, playfulness, bafflement and certainly involved in some family relationships can be given full scope, as it cannot be on film. So, we will look at how plays about families have changed over time, and make connections between some very different works.
WARNING: Some of these plays can be hard to read if you are going through a rough patch in your own family. If that’s the case, this may not be the time to take this course.

Engl. 1220W.04 – Drama: Forms and Techniques: “Dark Shadows: Or, How to Haunt a Stage”
Amanda Lehr
MWF – 12:10-1:00
What happens when people refuse to let go of the past—or the past refuses to let go of them? Develop your skills in analytical writing and critical thought as you examine a series of plays (from Macbeth to No Exit to Rabbit Hole) and film adaptations which explore what it means to be “haunted.” Hone your writing by producing three formal essays (plus revisions) and your communication abilities by participating in class discussion and performance activities. End the semester with a more thorough understanding of drama and of analytical writing, with portable skills and habits that will continue to benefit you through your college career and beyond.

Engl. 1230W.01 – Literature and Analytical Thinking: “Myths and Anti-Myths: (Re)Visions of the Frontier”
Thea Autry
MWF – 9:10-10:00
What can we learn from Captain Kirk? The answers may be plentiful, but we will start by situating Star Trek alongside other revisions of the frontier idea, like Blood Meridian, Django Unchained, and Jonathan Hickman’s East of West, in order to address questions of colonialism, expansion, race, power, sex, and violence. Grading will be based on four formal papers, paper revisions, a presentation, and regular informal writing, all designed to prepare students for conversing a broad range of ideas and disciplines.

Engl. 1230W.02 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:“Reimagining Sex and Gender”
Kira Braham
MWF – 10:10-11:00
What can we learn from the exploration of imaginary worlds? We will examine speculative fiction by authors such as Aldous Huxley, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Octavia Butler to consider the way in which their radical reimaginings of sexuality and gender can generate pressing questions that concern you in your own lives. You will have the opportunity to express your thoughts in a variety of writing genres, and we will focus on writing as a process, working together to develop thoughtful writing practices that will be of use to you throughout your academic career and beyond.

Engl. 1230W.03 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:  “Forbidden Love”
Joanna Huh
MWF – 10:10-11:00
Love is never what we expect it to be—it is more pain than pleasure, more torment than happiness, more dissatisfaction than comfort. And the ambivalence and complications of love are greater heightened when that love is forbidden. We will examine how taboo love is treated and depicted in literature and film, focusing on the representation of the paradoxical nature of love that emerges when societal constraints and conventions forbid specific relationships. Texts will include Shakespeare’s Othello, Nabokov’s Lolita, and Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room, supplemented by short stories and films like Memoirs of a Geisha and Moulin Rouge. Three formal essays and in-class participation will comprise the majority of your grade. You will end the semester a more critical thinker, reader, and writer and more adept in communicating your ideas through academic writing conventions.

Engl. 1230W.04 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:“Striving Towards Freedom: Black Youth and the Problem of the Color Line”
Magana Kabugi
MWF – 11:10-12:00
How can we define literature for African American youth? This is the main critical question that will frame our exploration of how black youth have grappled with issues of race and racism in American literature and popular culture. Through essay writing and engagement with books, film and social media, we will trace a lineage of narratives for and about Black youth starting with slave narratives through the Obama era.

Engl. 1230W.05 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:“Seeing Things: Phantoms and False Impressions in Literature and Film”
Katie Mullins
MWF – 9:10-10:00
Why and how do we “see” things that might not be real, and how can these visions shape our thoughts and actions? Develop your analytical thinking and critical writing skills by examining texts that take hallucination or delusion as a primary concern or mode of representation. These may include Shakespearean drama, Romantic prose and poetry, Gothic short stories, and selected films. At the end of the course, you’ll be more confident in your writing and revision skills and well versed in critical reading.

Engl. 1230W.06 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:“Reading Women as Writers and Texts”
Sari Carter
TR – 9:35-10:50
Does your gender influence how you write? What about how you read? Why does it matter? Sharpen your critical thinking and writing skills by engaging the crafted arguments of a variety of essays and novels about women, including Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women, Eliot’s Adam Bede, Hall’s The Well of Loneliness, and Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own. Assessment will primarily depend on three argumentative essays and two required revisions, with additional daily reading responses and a final presentation, aiming to develop your ability to effectively use academic writing conventions.

Engl. 1230W.07 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:  “Spaces of Welcome”
Rachel Gould
TR – 9:35-10:50
Accommodation. Sanctuary. Cordiality. We use these terms to discuss hospitality, but what does it mean to welcome someone? What is the relationship between the resident and guest? Where can we welcome people? Studying novels and short stories, we will consider such questions and examine the political, religious and economic aspects of hospitality. We will discuss the form of academic writing and develop analytical skills. This course requires three essays and a final project with readings from Jane Austen, Immanuel Kant, Daniel Defoe, and others.

Engl. 1230W.08 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:“I Just Work Here: Jobs in Literature”
Jesse Montgomery
TR – 11:00-12:15
Good jobs, bad jobs, dream jobs, dead-end jobs. Part time, student, and full employment. Job creators. Day laborers. Interns. Slackers. When we talk about jobs we talk about values. What is a good job? What does it mean to do a good job? Develop your critical reading and writing skills by exploring the ways in which literature and film both examine and shape our attitudes about jobs, work, and slacking off. Write and revise three essays over the course of the semester to sharpen your essay writing skills. Texts may include: Storming Heaven, Denise Giardina; Under the Feet of Jesus, Helena Maria Viramontes; Gilead, Marilynne Robinson; “Bartleby the Scrivener,” Herman Melville; Pastoralia, George Saunders; Harlan County USA, dir. Barbara Kopple; and The Parking Lot Movie, Meghan Eckman; and Office Space, Mike Judge.

Engl. 1230W.09 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:“Supernatural Fiction and Critical Writing”
Alex Oxner
TR – 1:10-2:25
What makes a good ghost story, and what is a ghost’s story? The space of the “unreal” or supernatural offers readers new ways to understand ourselves and gives writers tools for imagining new stories and histories. We will develop our critical and creative writing skills by examining ghosts, poltergeists, zombies, and other supernatural figures through the lenses of race, class, and gender. Students will write two “mini” essays and two formal essays that incorporate creative writing, close-reading, scholarly research, and other techniques that can be adapted to multiple college classroom environments.

Engl. 1230W.10 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:“Hunting Kinship”
Joey Jordan
TR - 4:00-5:15

What does ‘family’ have to do with hunting? How do ‘gender’ and ‘lineage’ play with our expectations of hunting stories? Develop further your academic writing and argumentation skills by examining the role of kinship and gender in six hunting narratives: The Diane and Actaeon myth, the Abrahamic story of Nimrod, the Grimm brothers’ “Little Red Riding Hood,” Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game,” Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, and Octavia Butler’s Wild Seed. Three formal essays will comprise the majority of your grade. Revise each essay once to end your semester more confident in your writing skills.

Engl. 1230W.11 – Literature and Analytical Thinking: “Canadian Literature and Culture”
James Phelan
TR – 4:00-5:15
A survey of Canadian fiction, poetry, film, visual art, and music, with an emphasis on the first three. As it brings the Canadianness of Canada into focus, the class should help us see America and the South afresh. Our exploration of Canadian culture and the questions that shape it will be the basis for an intensive group effort to become more effective critical writers.

Engl. 1230W.12 – Literature and Analytical Thinking: “Serialization and the Short Story”
Kylie Korsnack
TR – 8:10-9:25
What counts as serialization and how does this form of repetition influence the ways we read and interpret texts? In this course, we will explore these questions be analyzing the manifestation of serialization within a variety of audio-visual, digital, and print forms: short story collections, postmodern novels, podcasts, blogs, and television series. By critically engaging with all these primary texts, we will work to develop our ability to construct effective academic arguments that can contribute to current scholarly conversations within the field of literary studies and beyond. Along the way, we might even experiment with serialized writing of our own.

Engl. 1230W.13 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:  “Killing Danny Tanner: The Death of Adulthood in American Literature”
Terrell Taylor
MWF – 10:10-11:00
Do the old, white, heterosexual, able-bodied, male patriarch protagonists of traditional literature and culture have to die in order for young, female, non-straight, differently abled and/or non-white protagonists to exist? This course will explore American literature and media from a variety of traditions and backgrounds to explore the evolving and complex image of “the adult” as it changes throughout various moments in the twentieth century. Specific texts will include F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Gary Shteyngart’s Super Sad True Love Story, and Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao among others. Students will learn to analyze the rhetoric and language for the various assumptions that underpin any act of expression, and to defend and adopt critical positions in contemporary social and political debates surrounding culture and media.

Engl. 1230W.14 – Literature and Analytical Thinking:
Bridget Orr
MWF – 11:10-12:00

Engl. 1230W.15 – Literature and Analytical Thinking: “Stories of Childhood”
Robbie Spivey
MWF – 12:10-1:00
In Letters to a Young Poet, Rainer Maria Rilke writes: “Even if you found yourself in some prison, whose walls let in none of the world’s sounds—wouldn’t you still have your childhood, that jewel beyond all price, that treasure house of memories? Turn your attention to it.” In this class we turn our attention to stories of childhood, to the invention of childhood over time, and to the many ways children function in literature – including symbol, audience, and muse.

Engl. 1250W.01 – Introduction to Poetry:“Between Philosophy and Revelation”
Chance Woods
MWF – 9:10-10:00
Throughout the history of Western culture, poetry has occupied a preeminent place of importance because it has allowed people and civilizations a means of registering emotional impact, enchantment, historical narrative, prophetic vision, and psychological transformation. Develop further your critical writing and research skills by examining closely the poetry of Dante, John Milton, William Blake, Giacomo Leopardi, Christina Rossetti, Emily Dickenson, T.S. Eliot, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Ben Okri. Four required papers (two of which can be revised), will comprise the majority of your final grade (class discussion being the other part). Learn the enduring significance of poetry and end the semester more confident in your writing skills.

Engl. 1250W.02 – Introduction to Poetry
Jessie Hock
TR – 4:00-5:15
This class will introduce students to a wide range of poems and poetic forms. Taking the Renaissance, the Romantic period, the mid-nineteenth century, and the twenty-first century as historical touchstones, we will focus on some of the most important poetic forms of the Anglophone tradition: the sonnet, the ode, the psalm, and free verse. In order to understand poetry from the inside out, we will write our imitations of the poems we read for class. This writing practice complements the second goal of the class, which is to acquaint students with the skills necessary for writing academic papers. Students will learn about poetic form and poetic history while practicing the art of literary close reading and developing critical writing skills.
Course requirements include active class participation, regular reading responses, short creative assignments, and three essays of varying length (20-25 pages total), one of which must be substantially revised.

Engl. 1250W.04 – Introduction to Poetry
Lisa Dordal
MWF – 12:10-1:00
The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, imagery, figures of speech, sound, etc.). The first part of the course also will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, and Langston Hughes. In the second half of the course, we will read and discuss Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard, Li-Young Lee’s Book of My Nights and selections from Mark Doty’s collection Fire to Fire.

Engl. 1250W.05 – Introduction to Poetry: "Confession and Protest Today"
Keegan Finberg
MWF – 12:10-1:00
Take this class if you want to be introduced to what is happening in poetry right now. We will read radically contemporary poetry (published in 2015, 2016, and 2017) that is concerned with the ways in which the personal and the political spheres overlap. Poet, activist, and professor June Jordan wrote that "poetry is a political action...poetry means taking control of the language of your life. Good poems can interdict a suicide, rescue a love affair, and build a revolution." The poetry that we will read for this course tackles personal, intimate details of its speakers' lives while also critiquing systems of everyday racism and sexism, US involvement in wars in the Middle East, increasing wealth accumulation for the rich, and immigration policy. The center of gravity for this course is poetry of the United States but important conversations happen across borders. Because we will study poetry as it is alive in our current historical context, students should be prepared to discuss contemporary politics  and should be interested in forms of activism and protest. Most broadly, the course will introduce students to a range of contemporary poetry in order to study how poetic form takes on expressive and political power, and the course will focus on improving students' writing across the board. In addition to academic papers and presentations, students will write reading responses, go to poetry readings, engage in the process of poetic production, and even memorize a poem. Reading for the course includes full collections by Solomaz Sharif, Claudia Rankine, Anne Boyer, Ada Limón, and Ocean Vuong.

Engl. 1250W.06 – Introduction to Poetry
Lisa Dordal

MWF – 2:10-3:00
The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, imagery, figures of speech, sound, etc.). The first part of the course also will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, and Langston Hughes. In the second half of the course, we will read and discuss Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard, Li-Young Lee’s Book of My Nights and selections from Mark Doty’s collection Fire to Fire.
Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), one class presentation, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions.

Engl. 1250W.07 – Introduction to Poetry
Keegan Finberg
M WF – 3:10-4:00
Take this class if you want to be introduced to what is happening in poetry right now. We will read radically contemporary poetry (published in 2015, 2016, and 2017) that is concerned with the ways in which the personal and the political spheres overlap. Poet, activist, and professor June Jordan wrote that "poetry is a political action...poetry means taking control of the language of your life. Good poems can interdict a suicide, rescue a love affair, and build a revolution." The poetry that we will read for this course tackles personal, intimate details of its speakers' lives while also critiquing systems of everyday racism and sexism, US involvement in wars in the Middle East, increasing wealth accumulation for the rich, and immigration policy. The center of gravity for this course is poetry of the United States but important conversations happen across borders. Because we will study poetry as it is alive in our current historical context, students should be prepared to discuss contemporary politics  and should be interested in forms of activism and protest. Most broadly, the course will introduce students to a range of contemporary poetry in order to study how poetic form takes on expressive and political power, and the course will focus on improving students' writing across the board. In addition to academic papers and presentations, students will write reading responses, go to poetry readings, engage in the process of poetic production, and even memorize a poem. Reading for the course includes full collections by Solomaz Sharif, Claudia Rankine, Anne Boyer, Ada Limón, and Ocean Vuong.

Engl. 1250W.08 – Introduction to Poetry: The British Isles
Killian Quigley
TR – 2:35-3:50
What is the British poetic tradition, and how have its energies been engaged by poets working on its margins, or beyond its pale? We will approach this question, first, by selectively surveying the canon of British poetry - its preoccupations, its forms, its history. We will turn, subsequently, to a discussion of Irish poetry, and in particular of the ways Irish poets have worked through British materials to cultivate a poetic tradition that might be called Ireland's own. In so doing, we will not only glimpse the character of the British tradition, but better understand its nature as a tradition, one that moves across space and time, susceptible at every juncture to revision and repurposing. We will learn to ask provocative questions of poems, to describe them with acuity, to make compelling connections between them, and to write essays which communicate our insights and debates with clarity and conviction. Expect lively discussions.

Engl. 1250W.09 – Introduction to Poetry
Mary Somerville
MWF – 11:10-12:00
This course will trace the historical evolution of American poetics, starting with pre-colonial Native poetry, moving chronologically through the different literary movements, and ending with the contemporary landscape. Students will learn to read, discuss, and write critically about poetry as well as respond to readings through the composition of their own poems.

Engl. 1250W.10 – Introduction to Poetry
Keegan Finberg
MWF – 1:10-2:00
Take this class if you want to be introduced to what is happening in poetry right now. We will read radically contemporary poetry (published in 2015, 2016, and 2017) that is concerned with the ways in which the personal and the political spheres overlap. Poet, activist, and professor June Jordan wrote that "poetry is a political action...poetry means taking control of the language of your life. Good poems can interdict a suicide, rescue a love affair, and build a revolution." The poetry that we will read for this course tackles personal, intimate details of its speakers' lives while also critiquing systems of everyday racism and sexism, US involvement in wars in the Middle East, increasing wealth accumulation for the rich, and immigration policy. The center of gravity for this course is poetry of the United States but important conversations happen across borders. Because we will study poetry as it is alive in our current historical context, students should be prepared to discuss contemporary politics  and should be interested in forms of activism and protest. Most broadly, the course will introduce students to a range of contemporary poetry in order to study how poetic form takes on expressive and political power, and the course will focus on improving students' writing across the board. In addition to academic papers and presentations, students will write reading responses, go to poetry readings, engage in the process of poetic production, and even memorize a poem. Reading for the course includes full collections by Solomaz Sharif, Claudia Rankine, Anne Boyer, Ada Limón, and Ocean Vuong.

Engl. 1250W.11 – Introduction to Poetry: The British Isles
Killian Quigley
TR – 9:35-10:50
What is the British poetic tradition, and how have its energies been engaged by poets working on its margins, or beyond its pale? We will approach this question, first, by selectively surveying the canon of British poetry - its preoccupations, its forms, its history. We will turn, subsequently, to a discussion of Irish poetry, and in particular of the ways Irish poets have worked through British materials to cultivate a poetic tradition that might be called Ireland's own. In so doing, we will not only glimpse the character of the British tradition, but better understand its nature as a tradition, one that moves across space and time, susceptible at every juncture to revision and repurposing. We will learn to ask provocative questions of poems, to describe them with acuity, to make compelling connections between them, and to write essays which communicate our insights and debates with clarity and conviction. Expect lively discussions.

Engl. 1260W.01 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Laura Birdsall
MWF – 2:10-3:00
Teenagers occupy a thorny space in the American imagination: In pop culture, teens are often celebrated as feral, unencumbered creatures whose poorly calibrated moral compasses confirm some sort of ineffable emotional realness and whose bodies are unmarked by trouble and age. They are dangerous and consumable. But IRL, being a teenager usually means being treated alternately as a hapless, sloppy adult or as a giant, destruction-prone baby. We love and hate teens; we certainly don’t trust them. Our idolatry of a mythic, sexy quasi-adulthood is complicated by both our actual lived teenage experiences, as well as our contempt for kids these days on their beep-boop devices, all sexting each other and throwing their lives away on YouTube k-holes. Teens also comprise a massive marketing demographic; they often have at least a margin of disposable income, coupled with few financial responsibilities and a tendency to purchase compulsively and obsessively. How do we reconcile all of these unruly narratives? Which do we deem authentic, even when they diverge so obviously from our own teen lives? This class will examine narratives of American teenage-hood, spanning the 20th and 21st centuries, but focusing especially on the 1980s to present. We will examine the way that the story of the American teenager is sold by adults to teens, by adults to other adults, and by teens to each other. We will look at ways in which marketing teen culture has evolved. The reading/viewing material for this class will include graphic novels, films, and long and short prose fiction, as well as teen magazines and advertisements. Analytical writing assignments will comprise the majority of the coursework, but there will also be one creative project.

Engl. 1260W.02 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Planet Bollywood?: South Asian Literature and Film”
Akshya Saxena
MWF – 9:10-10:00
South Asia is almost a third of the world’s population, but what do we know about its literature and culture? This course offers an introduction to the literature and films of the 20th and 21st century South Asia. Bollywood from India and writings in English from India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh more broadly have received much global attention in recent times. We will study some of these texts along with literary and cinematic works translated and dubbed from other South Asian languages such as Hindi, Urdu, and Bangla. We will think about cultural difference in our fast globalizing world, and will critically reflect on the ways in which we have come to view, read, and know South Asia. As we do that, we will also learn to write critically about literature and film. (All texts and readings will be in English.)

Engl. 1260W.05 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Adaptation: Translating the Literary into Cinema”
Nancy Roche
MWF – 12:10-1:00
In this course we will focus on the relationship between literary texts and their cinematic counterparts. Through the study of plays, short fiction, novels, children’s literature, graphic novels, and foreign films, students will discern principles governing the process of cinematic adaptation. We will review narrative theory and structure, map changes in plotlines due to particular strategies of filmmakers, and observe cultural differences in foreign to domestic adaptations.  Elements of film art such as cinematography, mise-en-scene, lighting, use of color, costuming, computer generated imagery, and editing will be closely examined.
Focusing on the postmodern era, we will examine adaptation in the form of traditional, mainstream Hollywood film and low-budget, Independent Cinema. In order to scrutinize methods of narrative construction, we will consider stories that are manipulated to fit the objectives, methodology, and means of cinematic production. An analysis of specific literary texts, along with close observation of the films they generate, will allow us to judge the efficacy and merit of their content.  Possible works include: Much Ado About Nothing, Breakfast At Tiffany’s, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner), Fight Club, The Virgin Suicides, and Coraline.

Engl. 1260W.06 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Alternative Futures
Andy Hines
TR – 8:10-9:25
The twenty-first century has so far intensified the sense that the world as we know it is ending. Contemporary fictions have reflected this reckoning. This course explores the alternate futures - both near and far - imagined by writers, filmmakers, and theorists in works that reflect the gravity and absurdity of what is to come. Many of our course texts show that humans have played a significant role in making today's world and are often responsible for its problems: for example, climate change and gross inequality. Indeed, the course readings raise political and ethical questions about who will be protected from and who will be made vulnerable to catastrophe. Further, we will attend how futures may be experienced and figured differently, in ways mundane and spectacular, concrete and abstract. By analyzing and discussing these varying representational strategies, this course will equip its students with the writing and critical reading skills necessary to convey their experience and professional futures. The works assigned include Paul Beatty's The Sellout, Basma Abdel Aziz's The Queue, Tom McCarthy's Satin Island, and the television show Black Mirror. Students will write three papers, compose frequent reading responses, and be asked to work in groups to analyze what fictional futures tell us about our present.

Engl. 1260W.07 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Adaptation: Translating the Literary into Cinema”
Nancy Roche
MWF – 1:10-2:00
In this course we will focus on the relationship between literary texts and their cinematic counterparts. Through the study of plays, short fiction, novels, children’s literature, graphic novels, and foreign films, students will discern principles governing the process of cinematic adaptation. We will review narrative theory and structure, map changes in plotlines due to particular strategies of filmmakers, and observe cultural differences in foreign to domestic adaptations.  Elements of film art such as cinematography, mise-en-scene, lighting, use of color, costuming, computer generated imagery, and editing will be closely examined.
Focusing on the postmodern era, we will examine adaptation in the form of traditional, mainstream Hollywood film and low-budget, Independent Cinema. In order to scrutinize methods of narrative construction, we will consider stories that are manipulated to fit the objectives, methodology, and means of cinematic production. An analysis of specific literary texts, along with close observation of the films they generate, will allow us to judge the efficacy and merit of their content.  Possible works include: Much Ado About Nothing, Breakfast At Tiffany’s, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner), Fight Club, The Virgin Suicides, and Coraline.

Engl. 1260W.08 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Border Crossings”
Alex Dubilet
TR – 2:35-3:50
Images and stories of people fleeing their homelands to escape catastrophe saturate the contemporary political and social media landscape. They generate visceral emotional responses and call for immediate political solutions. Perhaps nothing marks the contemporary movement as much as the global refugee crises. But the refugee is not a simple empirical figure. As Hannah Arendt, herself a Jewish intellectual fleeing Nazi Germany, memorably wrote: “we don’t like to be called ‘refugees.’
We ourselves call each other ‘newcomers’ or ‘immigrants’.” This class will interrogate historically and conceptually the stakes of such differences: What makes someone a refugee rather than an immigrant, an exile, or a migrant? What are the histories and ramifications—affective, ethical, and political— of such categorizations? How can aesthetic production by and about displaced people complicate our understanding and allow us to think critically about the nature of the nation, of the state, and of the home? To explore these questions, this class will examine a broad range of texts including fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, memoirs, film, as well as shorter theoretical texts from a variety of perspectives, including philosophical, political, and sociological. Authors may include, among others, Homer, Ovid, Joseph Brodsky, Czeslaw Milosz, Derek Walcott, E.M. Cioran, W.G. Sebald, Mahmoud Darwish, Dionne Brand, Edward Said, Saidiya Harman, Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, Theodore Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Benedict Anderson, Jacques Derrida, among others.
Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), one class presentation, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions. 

Engl. 1260W.09 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Chicago, I Love You”
R.J. Boutelle
TR – 9:35-10:50
The Second City. The Windy City. Da Bears. Chicago has a long, storied history—from a destructive fire to organized crime to the World’s Fair to a goat to the GOAT (Jordan). Beginning with the industrial revolution in the postbellum period, which transformed the city from a Midwestern outpost to the railroad capital of North America, and carrying through to the present day, this course examines a wide array of efforts to represent, romance, and reimagine Chicago. We will discuss crime, immigration, race, sports, labor, violence, gender, nationalism, music, and much more. Possible texts might include Erik Larsen’s Devil in the White City (2003), Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle (1906), Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (1900), Sandra Cisnero’s The House on Mango Street (1984), Richard Wright’s Black Boy (1945), Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun (1959), David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross (1984), and the poetry of Nelson Algren, Carl Sandburg, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Common. This class will also include at least two mandatory film screenings that will take place outside of the class. Possible films include The Blues Brothers (1980), Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986), The Untouchables (1987), Dick Tracy (1990), Catching Hell (2011), and of course, Chicago (2002).

Engl. 1260W.10 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Whiteness in USAmerican Culture”
R.J. Boutelle
TR – 11:00-12:15
What does it mean to be white in the USA? Are whiteness, white people, and white culture coherent, meaningful categories? If so, what defines them? How inextricably is whiteness tethered to concept like supremacy, white privilege, and white nationalism? In this course, we’ll discuss literary, historical, anthropological, and sociological texts that describe how whiteness has come to occupy such a significant place in our culture. We’ll track whiteness through discussions of race, class, gender, patriotism, social uplift, affirmative action, and popular culture. Readings may include Edgar Allen Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Wells Brown, Harriet Wilson, Charles Chestnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Kate Chopin, F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Schuyler, Harper Lee, William Faulkner, James Baldwin, and Claudia Rankine, as well as historical, theoretical, and cultural texts, including the comedy of Dave Chappelle and Louis CK. This class will also include at least two mandatory film screenings that will take place outside of class. Possible films include The Birth of a Nation, The Blind Side, Pleasantville, Safe, and Dear White People.

Engl. 1260W.12 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Border Crossings”
Alex Dubilet
TR – 1:10-2:25
Images and stories of people fleeing their homelands to escape catastrophe saturate the contemporary political and social media landscape. They generate visceral emotional responses and call for immediate political solutions. Perhaps nothing marks the contemporary movement as much as the global refugee crises. But the refugee is not a simple empirical figure. As Hannah Arendt, herself a Jewish intellectual fleeing Nazi Germany, memorably wrote: “we don’t like to be called ‘refugees.’ We ourselves call each other ‘newcomers’ or ‘immigrants’.” This class will interrogate historically and conceptually the stakes of such differences: What makes someone a refugee rather than an immigrant, an exile, or a migrant? What are the histories and ramifications—affective, ethical, and political— of such categorizations? How can aesthetic production by and about displaced people complicate our understanding and allow us to think critically about the nature of the nation, of the state, and of the home? To explore these questions, this class will examine a broad range of texts including fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, memoirs, film, as well as shorter theoretical texts from a variety of perspectives, including philosophical, political, and sociological. Authors may include, among others, Homer, Ovid, Joseph Brodsky, Czeslaw Milosz, Derek Walcott, E.M. Cioran, W.G. Sebald, Mahmoud Darwish, Dionne Brand, Edward Said, Saidiya Harman, Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, Theodore Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Benedict Anderson, Jacques Derrida, among others.
Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), one class presentation, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions.

Engl. 1260W.13 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Elizabeth Meadows
TR – 4:00-5:15

Engl. 1260W.14 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis:“Shadow Histories: Narratives of Slavery in Law and Literature”
Faith Barter
MWF – 10:10-11:00
Slaves are not born but made—created in language and law through implausible definitions, discriminatory customs, and the oppressive weight of racist regimes. In this course, we will use literary and legal texts to examine the history of slavery, primarily in the United States, from the 18th century to the present. In so doing, we will consider representations of African enslavement, as well as its broader implications: sexual violence/rape, mass incarceration, and the right to one’s own labor. Paying particular attention to questions of both race and gender, this course will introduce you to literary representations of slavery’s history, as well as legal materials that created or authorized the conditions of slavery. We will also take seriously contemporary artifacts from pop culture, including film and television.
Texts may include: Notes on the State of Virginia (Thomas Jefferson), The History of Mary Prince (Mary Prince), Passing (Nella Larsen), The Bluest Eye (Toni Morrison), Venus (Suzan-Lori Parks), The New Jim Crow (Michelle Alexander), Plessy v. Ferguson, Buck v. Bell, and Do the Right Thing (film).

Engl. 1260W.15 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis:“Adaptation: Translating the Literary into Cinema”
Nancy Roche
MWF – 9:10-10:00
In this course we will focus on the relationship between literary texts and their cinematic counterparts. Through the study of plays, short fiction, novels, children’s literature, graphic novels, and foreign films, students will discern principles governing the process of cinematic adaptation. We will review narrative theory and structure, map changes in plotlines due to particular strategies of filmmakers, and observe cultural differences in foreign to domestic adaptations.  Elements of film art such as cinematography, mise-en-scene, lighting, use of color, costuming, computer generated imagery, and editing will be closely examined.
Focusing on the postmodern era, we will examine adaptation in the form of traditional, mainstream Hollywood film and low-budget, Independent Cinema. In order to scrutinize methods of narrative construction, we will consider stories that are manipulated to fit the objectives, methodology, and means of cinematic production. An analysis of specific literary texts, along with close observation of the films they generate, will allow us to judge the efficacy and merit of their content.  Possible works include: Much Ado About Nothing, Breakfast At Tiffany’s, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner), Fight Club, The Virgin Suicides, and Coraline.

Engl. 1260W.16 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Robbie Spivey
MWF – 2:10-3:00

Engl. 1260W.17 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Shadow Histories: Narratives of Slavery in Law and Literature”
Faith Barter
MWF – 3:10-4:00
Slaves are not born but made—created in language and law through implausible definitions, discriminatory customs, and the oppressive weight of racist regimes. In this course, we will use literary and legal texts to examine the history of slavery, primarily in the United States, from the 18th century to the present. In so doing, we will consider representations of African enslavement, as well as its broader implications: sexual violence/rape, mass incarceration, and the right to one’s own labor. Paying particular attention to questions of both race and gender, this course will introduce you to literary representations of slavery’s history, as well as legal materials that created or authorized the conditions of slavery. We will also take seriously contemporary artifacts from pop culture, including film and television.
Texts may include: Notes on the State of Virginia (Thomas Jefferson), The History of Mary Prince (Mary Prince), Passing (Nella Larsen), The Bluest Eye (Toni Morrison), Venus (Suzan-Lori Parks), The New Jim Crow (Michelle Alexander), Plessy v. Ferguson, Buck v. Bell, and Do the Right Thing (film).

Engl. 1260W.18 – Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: “Whiteness in USAmerican Culture”
R.J. Boutelle
TR – 1:10-2:25
What does it mean to be white in the USA? Are whiteness, white people, and white culture coherent, meaningful categories? If so, what defines them? How inextricably is whiteness tethered to concept like supremacy, white privilege, and white nationalism? In this course, we’ll discuss literary, historical, anthropological, and sociological texts that describe how whiteness has come to occupy such a significant place in our culture. We’ll track whiteness through discussions of race, class, gender, patriotism, social uplift, affirmative action, and popular culture. Readings may include Edgar Allen Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Wells Brown, Harriet Wilson, Charles Chestnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Kate Chopin, F. Scott Fitzgerald, George Schuyler, Harper Lee, William Faulkner, James Baldwin, and Claudia Rankine, as well as historical, theoretical, and cultural texts, including the comedy of Dave Chappelle and Louis CK. This class will also include at least two mandatory film screenings that will take place outside of class. Possible films include The Birth of a Nation, The Blind Side, Pleasantville, Safe, and Dear White People.

Engl. 1270W.02 – Introduction to Literary Criticism
Killian Quigley
TR – 11:00-12:15

Engl. 1280.01 – Beginning Fiction Workshop
Tony Earley
M – 3:10-6:00

Engl. 1280.02 – Beginning Fiction Workshop
Piyali Bhattacharya
T – 3:10-6:00

Engl. 1290.01 – Beginning Poetry Workshop
Max McDonough
TR – 11:00-12:15

Engl. 1290.02 – Beginning Poetry Workshop
Derek Pfister
TR – 9:35-10:50


2000-Level
Courses:

Engl. 2200.03 – Foundations of Literary Study: “Lost and Found/ations of Literary Study”
John Bradley
TR – 9:35-10:50
Already enjoy getting lost in a good book? This course introduces you to approaches to reading and interpreting texts that are basic to the study of literature, and to get there we’ll be approaching the act of ‘getting lost’ and “loss” itself from many angles through our course theme: “Lost and Found/ations of Literary Study.”
Why “lost and found”? Here’s the idea: Serious study begins not with certainties, but with entering unfamiliar territory and facing thorny, often unsettled questions. As we study literary works of the 20th and 21st century, you will practice asking questions and develop the habits you need to confidently approach any literary text. To get there, we’ll face what it means to get a little lost ourselves and celebrate disorientation in and as a result of studying literary works, all in service of building a solid foundation for yourself as a student of literature.
Required reading will include Alice Oswald’s Memorial: A Version of Homer’s Iliad, Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, a unit on ecopoetry, and Jonathan Culler’s Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Writing assignments will include short analytical essays, a creative writing assignment, and a final project informed by research.

Engl. 2200.04 – Foundations of Literary Study:“Modes of Power in Anglophone Literature”
Elizabeth Covington
MWF – 9:10-10:00
In this course, we will investigate the different modes of power and violence in Anglophone literary texts of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across the globe. These texts draw on themes of war, racism, patriarchy, heterosexual normativity, and class to contemplate the differential power relationships within and between people of various cultures. Incorporating frames of literary and critical theory, we will interrogate universal and culturally contextual modes of power and violence and consider the role of literary production in relation to the reproduction of and resistance to structures of domination.

Engl. 2200.05 – Foundations of Literary Study: “Technologies of Print, Reading, and Interpretation”
Pavneet Aulakh
TR – 4:00-5:15
Most of us have been around books and reading for as long as we can remember; and even while we love passing hours huddled up with a good book, our familiarity with the book as an object and with reading as a silent and private practice can dull our sensitivity to the unique and complex histories of both reading and books. Indeed, as we shall learn, books are but one instrument in a history of reading that has relied on technologies ranging from scrolls and tablets to scrollable text on computer screens, iPads, and e-readers, each with their own protocols for use accompanied by distinct advantages and disadvantages. Reanimating our engagement with these instruments of knowledge, we will think critically about what it is we do when we read, and even how and why we read. Since books are the obvious objects of our study, over the semester we will read fiction, drama, and poetry that dramatize lessons in reading and interpretation, and raise the status of books from mere containers of information to objects with considerable power. In our encounters with books that damn (Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus), books that lead to madness (Cervantes’ Don Quixote), and magical books capable of enchanting an entire island’s inhabitants (Shakespeare’s The Tempest), we will enrich our awareness of the strange power of books as well as the cultural practices that govern their production and reading. In addition to the texts cited above, our readings will also include Renaissance poetry, Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, and short stories by Jorge Luis Borges and Jhumpa Lahiri. Designed as a gateway to the English major, this course will introduce, develop, and refine the skills of close-reading, critical analysis, and argumentation that are fundamental to your success not just as a student of English literature but at the university at large.

Engl. 2200.06 – Foundations of Literary Study: “Modes of Power in Anglophone Literature”
Elizabeth Covington
MW – 3:10-4:25
In this course, we will investigate the different modes of power and violence in Anglophone literary texts of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across the globe. These texts draw on themes of war, racism, patriarchy, heterosexual normativity, and class to contemplate the differential power relationships within and between people of various cultures. Incorporating frames of literary and critical theory, we will interrogate universal and culturally contextual modes of power and violence and consider the role of literary production in relation to the reproduction of and resistance to structures of domination.

Engl. 2310.01 – Representative British Writers
Andrea Hearn
MWF – 10:10-11:00
This course will introduce students to the foundations of British literature in its first thousand years of development: from Beowulf to Paradise Lost, we will read representative works covering major (and many minor) writers, movements, genres, and techniques. We will pay attention to the relationship of our readings to their specific moments—their political, social, economic, religious, and cultural contexts. This is a thrilling span of British history: from Viking raids, the Norman Conquest, and the Hundred Years War; from Agincourt, the Wars of the Roses, and the defeat of the Spanish Armada; to the Pilgrims at Plymouth, the Civil Wars, the Restoration, and the Great Fire of London. The literature is correspondingly various and exciting, moving from epics through romances, dramas, and sonnet sequences, and back to epics again. Major readings (in whole or in part) will likely include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Morte d’Arthur, As You Like It, Henry V, and Paradise Lost. In addition to vigorous class discussion, the course will require a variety of writing assignments, including directed exercises, exams, and essays, and a group dramatic presentation.
This course satisfies this History/Pre-1800 requirement.

Engl. 2311.01 – Representative British Writers
Roy Gottfried
MWF – 9:10-10:00
No writer writes in a vacuum. Moved not only by the surrounding events of the time and place, a writer is changed as well by previous authors and works. This course will examine the major periods of English literature from the Restoration to the Modern era in their cultural features and will study the major poets in engagement with their literary predecessors. The course provides an exposure to the famous works of the English tradition for the general student and provides a broad background for those students considering more specialized advanced studies.


3000-Level Courses:

Engl. 3220.01 – Advanced Nonfiction Writing
Randall Kenan
T – 12:10-3:00
Students in the course will explore the various modes of non-fiction writing applied to representing actual experience, or what has been called Emersion Journalism.  Unlike conventional journalism, this course will focus on admittedly subjective modes of representation, and students will actively discuss the relationship between author and subject.  Through reading and discussion the students will examine ideas and problems such as an author’s persona in the work, the concept of “facts,” and the ongoing debate over subjectivity versus objectivity in non-fiction writing.   Another goal of this course will be to equip the student writer with a better understanding and approach to fundamental techniques of narrative non-fiction writing: character development, point-of-view, dialogue, language, narrative structure and organization, tone, focus. Students will be expected to produce no less than two 2500 word (approx. 10 pages) pieces of narrative non-fiction over the course, plus one revision at the end of the semester.
Required Texts:  The Art of Fact: A Historical Anthology of Literary Journalism, ed. Kevin Kerrane and Ben Yagoda; Driving Mr. Albert: A Trip Across America with Einstein’s Brain, Michael Paterniti.

Engl. 3230.01 – Intermediate Fiction Workshop
Justin Quarry
W – 3:10-6:00
This workshop is geared toward those who already have some experience writing short stories, with the intentions of broadening students’ knowledge of the elements of craft and strengthening their utilization of narrative techniques, and of incorporating elements of fantasy in literary fiction. The chief texts for this course will be approximately thirty stories written by workshop members, but throughout the semester students also will read and examine craft essays and contemporary American short fiction in order to better understand how to apply what they learn to their own writing.  The final for the course will consist of a significant revision of one of two original stories produced during the semester. Previous creative writing workshop experience is strongly recommended before taking this class, and instructor permission is required to enroll. Sign up on the course's YES waitlist, and you will receive application instructions for the course in early December.

Engl. 3230.02 – Intermediate Fiction Workshop
Lorraine Lopez
W – 12:10-3:00
This course focuses on the development of narrative techniques related to the short story. As such, the workshop is designed to help members gain greater proficiency in creating effective characterization; building sound narrative structures; using perspective judiciously and consistently; balancing summary with scene; developing setting and imagery that evokes the physical world of the story; applying significant detail to enhance scene, characterization, mood, and tone; and acquiring revision and editing strategies. Over the semester, students will compose two original short stories, complete three writing exercises, attend and respond to three literary events, and read and critique original narratives by peers. Workshop members will also analyze, present on, and discuss published short stories in Best American Short Stories, 2016 (edited by Junot Diaz and Heidi Pitlor) in conjunction with chapters in Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative and Craft (Janet Burroway, et al) and/or craft articles by various authors.

Engl. 3240.02 – Advanced Fiction Workshop
Nancy Reisman
W – 12:10-3:00
This workshop is designed as a forum for experienced fiction writers to expand their visions, refine their aesthetics, and consider questions about fictional form and art-making. It’s a chance to take risks in the work, to delve more deeply into fiction writing interests, and, in a serious artistic way, to play. We’ll focus mainly on short story forms, revisit some essential matters of craft and technique, and consider significant questions about time, perception, and spatial relationships in stories, uses of defamiliarization, and the roles of silence, among other issues. It’s my hope that the workshop will foster experimentation as well as enable writers to further develop established strengths. The reading and writing for the course will be literary fiction generally based on realism (extending to surrealism, magical realism, meta-fiction). The core questions remain: what material, style, methods of storytelling interest you the most and how can you best access that material? What is the potential and what are the apparent boundaries of different fictional forms? The heart of this course is the workshop: the development and discussion of your creative work-in-progress. We’ll also read and discuss several published stories and essays on craft.

Engl. 3260.02 – Advanced Poetry Workshop
Rick Hilles
T – 3:10-6:00
This is an advanced poetry workshop, and, as such, I envision it as an opportunity for you to deepen your relationship to the practice of poetry. To facilitate this deepening, our sessions will be rigorous, lively, and inspiring. You will be encouraged to experiment with many different forms and styles of poetry, reading extensively the work of both your peers and published poets, many in connection with the Gertrude and Harold S. Vanderbilt Visiting Writers Series, including Mark Jarman, Ocean Vuong, and Ada Limón. The main focus for our class will be the writing workshop, in which we discuss your poems and those by your peers, all the while seeking the most helpful and fruitful ways to improve all creative work. By the end of the semester, my aim is to help you meet and even exceed your expectations while discovering new favorite poems and poets in the process.

Engl. 3314.01 – Chaucer
Pavneet Aulakh
TR – 1:10-2:25
In this course we will go on a spring-time "pilgrimage" with Chaucer and some of his vividly imagined pilgrims who swap stories as they journey to Canterbury. Called "the well of English undefiled" by Edmund Spenser and the "father of English poetry" by Dryden, Chaucer and his tales will also allow us to travel back in time to familiarize ourselves not only with medieval England and culture, but also with the linguistic and poetic roots of the language that he helped to make our own.
This course satisfies the History / Pre-1800 requirement.

Engl. 3340.01 – Shakespeare: Representative Selections: “Shakespeare and the Conduct of Manhood”
Vereen Bell
TR – 1:10-2:25
In his mighty tome, Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, Harold Bloom makes the extravagant claim that the complexities of what we now understand to be human nature had not existed in representation before Shakespeare put them before us in his plays and poems:
Literary character before Shakespeare is relatively unchanging; women and men are presented as aging and dying, but not changing because their relationship to themselves, rather than to the gods or God, has changed.  In Shakespeare, characters develop rather than unfold, and they develop because they reconceive themselves….  The dominant Shakespearean characters– Falstaff, Hamlet, Rosalind, Iago, Lear, Macbeth, Cleopatra among them– are extraordinary instances not only of how meaning gets started, rather than repeated, but also of how new modes of consciousness come into being.
This episode of English 3340 will take what Bloom says for granted (not that there aren't plenty of claims about Shakespeare) and explore one corner of the project he describes.  We will focus on how some of Shakespeare's strongest male characters both conceive of and reconceive themselves, for better and worse, within the context of their being male subjects to begin with, maleness being what it is they have to work with. Think of Falstaff versus Prince Hal, or of Macbeth constantly having to be told by his wife to man up and get the job done, or Hamlet brooding over the code of honor, or Lear's deranging patriarchal pride, or Marc Antony as warrior and triumvir on the one hand and as the passionate lover of Egypt's queen on the other.
The plays we will study– Richard II, Henry IV, Part I, Henry IV Part II, Henry V, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Antony and Cleopatra¬– are far too complex to risk strangling with a single thematic approach.  The issues described above involving manhood (very different in each of the plays) will be addressed more as a thread that runs through the plays, as a sometimes barely visible common denominator, than as an exclusive, foregrounded theme.  In fact, it is the whole, complicated gestalt of each of these great plays that commends them, as Bloom implies, to our study and our understanding in the first place.
Your instructor in this section of "Shakespeare" is not an Early Modern specialist– is in it for interest in the subject and love of the plays– so the playing field between the instructor and the students will be more nearly level than it normally is, for better or for worse.
This course satisfies the History/Pre-1800 requirement.

Engl. 3340W.01 – Shakespeare: Representative Selections: “Feeling Knowledge in Shakespeare”
Pavneet Aulakh
TR – 11:00-12:15
In this course, we will engage a representative selection of Shakespeare’s works spanning his career and covering the multiple genres he worked in: from comedies, to a history, to some of his most staggering tragedies, and finally plays that seem to defy these tidy classifications. Along the way, we will ask: what precisely are these plays representative of; and how are they representative of Shakespeare himself and his age? To answer these questions, we will consider the rhetorical and generic conventions by which Shakespeare’s plays were understood by his audiences; but we will be equally concerned with learning about our own cultural, editorial, and interpretative practices and how they shape our own understanding of his art. In addition to being guided by these larger questions of interpretation, authorship, and cultural history, our study of Shakespeare will respond to the frequency with which his plays stage the limits of reason, the power and danger of the imagination, and the means by which we arrive at knowledge. With our focus on questions of epistemology, of what and how something can be known, we shall also have occasion to reflect on how plays as different as Midsummer’s Night’s Dream, Henry V, Much Ado About Nothing, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, The Winter’s Tale, and Cymbeline all represent Shakespeare’s and his culture’s views on his craft, which itself traffics in illusions and practices on the eyes and ears of its audiences, including ourselves.
This course satisfies the History/Pre-1800 requirement.

Engl. 3346.01 – Seventeenth-Century Literature
Leah Marcus and Rick Hilles
MW – 4:00-5:15
This course looks in depth at some of the most moving and intriguing poetry ever written, some of it erotic, some devotional, some mysteriously both at once. There will be special attention to the work of John Donne, Robert Herrick, George Herbert, and Andrew Marvell. We will also consider the modern legacy of these poets by studying their strong influence on contemporary poets like Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, Tom Gunn, Natasha Trethewey, Ada Limón, Seamus Heaney, and Mark Jarman. It would be fair to say that modern poetry would not have the shape it has without the legacy of seventeenth-century poetry. The course will be team-taught by Rick Hilles, who is a practicing poet, and Leah Marcus, a scholar who specializes in seventeenth-century literature.
This course satisfies the History/Pre-1800 requirement.

Engl. 3360.01 – Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: “Sex, Celebrity, Money, and Power: Culture and Literature in Britain, 1660-1800”
Bridget Orr
MWF – 10:10-11:00
In 1660, London theaters reopened after closure by the godly government of the Interregnum, and actresses appeared on stage for the first time. They became the stars of the first celebrity culture; their images were sold widely, scandals circulated and they acquired fans and stalkers. A libertine court defied puritan and bourgeois morality and the theater displayed a new sexual frankness. Women began writing professionally for the first time in these years and their poetry, plays and novels engaged critically with social and political structures that embedded male privilege. Writers were not just preoccupied with vicious internal national politics but by the world beyond Europe, newly visible and important through trade, not least that in African slaves.
In this course, we will read poetry, plays, novels and memoirs produced during the creation of a commercially driven society that endured the first great financial crash, invented Anglophone feminism and pornography, pet-keeping, culture wars, coffee-houses, a fashion system and new media. We will also read texts by laboring-class writers and writers of color whose previously occluded voices found responsive readers in the new market place of print, joining and shaping debates over social justice and human rights.
This course satisfies the History/Pre-1800 requirement.

Engl. 3364.01 – The Eighteenth-Century English Novel
Jonathan Lamb
TR – 11:00-12:15
The eighteenth century is generally regarded as the period that saw the rise of the novel. Compared with the prose romances of the previous centuries, where knights battled each other and ladies were alternately wooed and abducted in Arcadian landscapes, the novel was new (novel) because it showed life as it was, ‘really’ was. ‘What delights are works of fiction such as exhibit life in its true state, diversified only by accidents that happen in the world,’ wrote the critic and lexicographer Samuel Johnson. So we shall try to do three things. First of all we shall look at two romances: Malory’s Morte d’Arthur from the late 15th century and Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess from the early 18th. Having made some provisional judgements about how romance represents experience, we shall read three novels that consciously reject the improbability and immorality of romance, but all in different ways: Cerenates’s Don Quixote, Madame de Lafayette’s The Princess of Cleves, and Henry Fielding’s Joseph Andrews. Then we’ll go the first part of Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, whose epistolary style (‘writing to the moment’ as Richardson called it) gave unrivaled and apparently immediate access to the thoughts and feelings of his heroine, a servant-girl. By way of contrast we shall look at a novel of sensibility that makes comedy out of immediacy (Laurence Sterne’s A Sentimental Journey), and then our survey will end with two novels recalling features of romance, Matthew Lewis’s The Monk and Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey. Third and concurrently with the first and second parts of the project, we shall be examining how the consumption of novels was understood by critics in the eighteenth century, and how it is understood now.
Thomas Malory, Morte d’Arthur (selections); Eliza Haywood, Love in Excess; Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote (first part); Marie-Madeline de Lafayette, The Princess of Cleves; Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews; Samuel Richardson, Pamela (up to the marriage with Mr. B); Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey; Matthew Lewis, The Monk; and Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey. There will be a fair lump of reading to be done each week, but you will find these novels for the most part as easy to read as modern ones and none of them is very long. Where necessary I shall either reproduce and circulate ancillary material—portions of the Morte d’Arthur, critical essays, etc.—or direct you to where you can find it. Presentations will be done in groups of three and tackle a specific issue important for the class’s appreciation of the background of a given novel: the status of literature as a cultural and economic phenomenon; the status of women as characters and readers; differences between genres such as history; chivalric and pastoral romance, pornography and realist fiction; the importance of the print-market and its relation to intellectual property.
This course satisfies the History/Pre-1800 requirement.

Engl. 3370.01 – The Bible in Literature
Roy Gottfried
MWF – 11:10-12:00
Echoes and long shadows of the Authorized Version of the Bible (King James Version) in English Literature of the 17th through the twentieth centuries. Works include: poetry of Donne, Herbert, Marvell, and others; Milton’s epic Paradise Lost; Tennyson’s elegy In Memoriam; and Eliot’s The Waste Land. Some familiarity with the Bible is helpful, but not necessary. A midterm essay exam, a 15 page paper, and a final exam.
This course satisfies the History/Pre-1800 requirement.

Engl. 3610.01 – The Romantic Period:“Romanticism: The Passions and the Horrors”
Mark Schoenfield
TR – 9:35-10:50
While glory seemed betrayed, while patriot zeal
Sank in our hearts, we felt as men should feel
With such vast hordes of hidden carnage near;
And horror breathing from the silent ground.
So wrote Wordsworth, upon visiting the fields of Waterloo, with its stray discarded bullets, scraps of ripped uniforms, and occasional brittle bones, after Napoleon’s final defeat. Associated with a shift from the imaginative to the expressive mode of poetry, romantic literature reflects a time of revolution, when Britain feared enemy invasion, confronted its own dreadful engagement in the slave trade, faced famine and the massive disruptions of industrialization. Its writers sought new literary genres and theoretical formulations of the mind to understand this turbulence. In this class, we will explore poets, novelists, and journalists whose experiments in writing transformed aesthetic norms and social understandings. Writers will include William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, and their daughter Mary Shelley; William and Dorothy Wordsworth; and others who explore their capacity for passion and horror.

Engl. 3622.01 – Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers
Hortense Spillers
MWF – 10:10-11:00
This course is devoted to a study of select women writers at work in the cultural and political context of the United States from the middle of the Nineteenth Century to the end of it and the initial years of the Twentieth. This crucial period of national life sows the seeds of modernity and essentially redefines the democratic state as the historical horizon against which human possibility might unfold: crisis in the latter ushers the country into civil wat and the emancipation of the African bonded that brought slavery in the U.S. to a halt; the long arc of history that is described from the end of the Civil War marks the political and social transition that still effects American life as an experiment in the cohabitation of disparate races and peoples. How the nation’s lettered class responds to the crisis and produces as a result a distinctive literary form will lend shape to the curriculum f this course that begins with the poetry of Emily Dickinson and proceeds through the work of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, Ida Wells, Frances E.W. Harpet, ending with the fiction of Kate Chopin, among others.

Engl. 3630.01 – The Modern British Novel
Jonathan Lamb
TR – 1:10-2:25
This course is conceived partly as a survey course of fiction written by British authors in the 20th century, and partly as a lightly themed approach to the onset of war and its aftermath. The first three novels listed below either deal with portents war or with the material and psychological effects of the losses caused by it—loss of relatives and lovers, loss of property and loss of faith in any kind of future. Evelyn Waugh’s novel takes its title from Eliot’s The Waste Land. The fourth novel is a dramatic evocation of the material and spiritual privation of the second post-war period, and the seventh returns to the traumas of the First World War. On the other hand, Martin Amis’s coming of age novel is far lighter in tone, and so is Penelope Fitzgerald’s, while the melancholy of Ishiguro’s is more diffused than any of the others.
We shall not neglect the overarching question of modernism, and how experimental writers such as Virginia Woolf experiment with the representation of space and time, or how cleverly Ford Maddox inhabits the narrator-persona of a badly deceived husband. The questions raised by Orwell about history and language in the context of totalitarian politics are done so effortlessly as to seem journalistic, but they will repay serious examination. Pat Barker’s Regeneration is the first of a trilogy dealing largely with the experience of poets facing circumstances so extreme their ability to convey what they feel becomes badly compromised. She raises a problem that one way or another is represented in all of these novels: of language that no longer seems fit to convey what is happening, requiring considerable formal adaptation therefore if it is to send any kind of message at all.
Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier (1915); Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (1927); Evelyn Waugh, A Handful of Dust (1934); George Orwell, 1984 (1948); Martin Amis, The Rachel Papers (1973); Penelope Fitzgerald, At Freddie’s (1982); Kazuo Ishiguro, Remains of the Day (1989); Pat Barker, Regeneration (1991). Presentations will be given in groups of two or three. Essays are two short ones (1500 words) and one long one (3000 words) that will be in effect your final exam. They will constitute 70% of your final grade. Contributions in class and presentations will account for the remaining 30%.

Engl. 3650.01 – Ethnic-American Literature
Candice Amich
MWF – 11:10-12:00
This course will survey the major traditions of ethnic American literatures—including the African American, Asian American, Latino/a and Native American—from a comparative perspective that highlights the commonalities and differences among and within these groupings. In their indexing of other national traditions and forms, ethnic American literatures anticipate the challenge that globalization poses to the idea of an American literature bounded within the borders of the United States. Course texts will be organized according to three rubrics across genre and group: narratives of nativity and sacrifice; lyrics and stories of arrival and loss; and performances or precarious histories.
This is an Honors Seminar—a cumulative 3.4 GPA is required for admittance.
This course satisfies the Diverse Perspectives requirement.

Engl. 3654.01 – African-American Literature
Gabriel Briggs
MWF – 9:10-10:00
This course is a survey of African-American Literature that begins with Slave Narratives and ends with Contemporary Thought. As much as the seminar will provide students with an overview of the prominent periods in African-American Literature, it is also a seminar in developing the students’ general critical skills. To that end, the seminar will introduce students to contemporary theoretical and critical models that have been instrumental in revising African-American literary history (e.g. critical race theory). Students will work toward developing strategies for positioning authors and texts within specific cultural, historical, and theoretical contexts, and should be willing to experiment with new ways of reading literary and cultural texts. Among the authors we will read are Harriet Wilson, Sutton Griggs, Richard Wright, and Toni Morrison.
This course satisfies the Diverse Perspectives requirement.

Engl. 3658.01 – Latino-American Literature
Lorraine Lopez
MWF – 10:10-11:00
Latino/a literature is American Literature produced by writers inculcated in the US experience, self-identifying as Latinos/as and usually writing in English. The course will examine the enduring dynamic cultural production that crosses and re-crosses borders constructed by geography, linguistics, class, race, and gender. As such, students will read, analyze, discuss, present on, and write about prose, poetry, and drama by authors of Mexican, Cuban, Dominican, Puerto Rican, and South and Central American descent who live and write in the United States. In exploring the diversity within this cultural diversity, the course accommodates a range of voices, with a focus on newer works by contemporary authors, including Julia Alvarez, Richard Blanco, Jennine Capo, Junot Diaz, Yuri Herrera, Quiara Alegría Hudes, Justin Torres, and Kristen Quade Valdez. Texts by these authors will be examined within an historical context in order for students to apprehend connections and disconnections to literary traditions from which the writing emerges and to formulate ideas about where it is headed.
This course satisfies the Diverse Perspectives requirement.

Engl. 3662.01 – Asian American Literature: “How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia”
Ben Tran
MW – 2:10-3:25
It is necessary to begin with a disclaimer: this is not a get-rich-quick workshop that offers you some secret economic key to the riches of Asia. Rather, this is a course that examines the growing literary assessment—by both Asian writers as well as diasporic authors—of the ideology and practice of Asian capitalism. The rate and scale of modernization in present-day Asia are unprecedented. This development defies the imagination of many, forcing authors to grapple with alienation, class disparity, and neoliberalism. We will pay particular attention to global cities, technology, and the history of capitalism. Our readings will also trace the different forms and genres employed to address contemporary Asian capitalism: from photography and realism to self-help books and science fiction. Readings may include: Rana Dasgupta’s Capital (excerpts); Amitav Ghosh’s Sea of Poppies; Mohsin Hamid’s How To Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia; Eddie Huang’s Double Cup Love (author of Fresh Off the Boat); Hao Jingfang’s “Folding Beijing”; Kevin Kwan’s Crazy Rich Asians; Dinh Linh’s Love Like Hate; Dinh Linh’s photography; A Yi’s A Perfect Crime; and Tash Aw’s Five-Star Billionaire.
This course satisfies the Diverse Perspectives requirement.

Engl. 3670.01 – Colonial and Post-Colonial Literature: “Global Englishes”
Akshya Saxena
MWF – 1:10-2:00
How well do you know the English language? In this course, we will explore the diversity of what we understand as “English” through its literary, visual, digital, and sonic itineraries around the world. We are interested in the multiple languages and cultural enclaves that already exist within the globally dominant “English.” We are also interested in economies of accents and brands, and the profound materiality of English in global markets and media.
To this end, we will study fiction, poetry, film, text-based art, and music in English from a variety of geopolitical contexts. We are looking at the United Kingdom, the United States, India, China, Nigeria, Singapore, Ireland, and Uganda (among others!). This course understands the premise of language as power through histories of colonialism, decolonization, migration, technological innovation, globalization, and class and race conflict, that have spurred the spread and consolidation of the English language(s) as we know it.
This course satisfies the Diverse Perspectives requirement.

Engl. 3674.01 – Caribbean Literature:“Life, Literature, and Music in the Caribbean Diaspora”
Ifeoma Nwankwo
TR – 2:35-3:50
This course brings together literary texts, interviews, life stories, music, and new media produced by Caribbean communities in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the Republic of Panama, communities that have their roots in Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad, Barbados, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic, among other Caribbean countries.
Our objective is to gain an understanding of: The diverse experiences, identities, and cultures of Caribbean immigrants in different regions/countries; the impact of Caribbean cultures on literature, music, and film across the world; and the ways in which Caribbean cultures, experiences, and approaches to identity compare and/or contrast with those of other groups/communities.
We will explore questions such as: How is home defined? As a place in the Caribbean? As the nation of residence? As an imagined site between the two? Is that site created through memories? Thorough language? Through return visits? What impact have these groups had on their nations of residence, particularly in the arenas of literature and culture? We will also consider the similarities and differences between the approaches to self-definition taken by individuals from disparate generations, and the impact those similarities and differences have on intergenerational relations.
The reading/viewing/listening list includes short stories, novels, oral and life history interviews, poetry, songs, and autobiographies. Scholarly readings in each unit will introduce you to the key terms, concepts, issues, and methods that will help you to interpret these Caribbean Diaspora texts and experiences. Visits by guest speakers and field trips will also supplement our readings. Assignments: Journal entries; Group Presentation; Midterm Project/Paper; Final Project/Paper.
This course satisfies the Diverse Perspectives requirement.

Engl. 3678.01 – Anglophone African Literature:“Post-Apartheid South African Literature”
Marzia Milazzo
TR – 11:00-12:15
This course focuses on post-1994 South African literature in English, with an emphasis on novels by young Black writers that creatively capture the hustle and bustle of everyday life in the aftermath of apartheid. Though the study of works that will take us to the affluent suburbs of Johannesburg, the bustling township of Soweto, the poverty-stricken inner-city neighborhood of Hillbrow, or the lively Wits University campus, the course aims to not only provide students with key insights into the exciting post-apartheid literary landscape, but also to equip them with an understanding of actual challenges that shape ordinary life in present-day South Africa, especially challenges that affect the youth. The novels that we will read thus engage issues that are particularly relevant to young people, such as surviving the first year in college (Dog Eat Dog), realizing one’s dreams while overcoming poverty (Room 207), or battling with self-acceptance in the face of racist and sexist standards (Coconut). Alongside literary texts, we will also examine history, music, video, film, and news media.
This course satisfies the Diverse Perspectives requirement.

Engl. 3720.01 – Literature, Science, and Technology:“Frankenstein’s Future: Robotics and Cloning in Science Fiction and Film”
Jay Clayton
TR – 9:35-10:50
How do the futures literature and film imagine shape public attitudes toward science and technology? What is the human in an age of artificial intelligence, autonomous weapons, and synthetic biology? How does science fiction and film influence public policy concerning scientific research? This course focuses on fictions and films about artificial life from Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) and James Whale’s iconic 1931 film of that novel, through Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World (1932), to classic robot stories by Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, and others, to twenty-first century dystopias such as Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake (2003), David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas (2004), Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go (2005), and Paolo Bacigalupi, The Windup Girl (2009). Films will include adaptations of many of these novels, as well as Blade Runner (1982), A.I. (2001), Her (2013), and Ex Machina (2015).
This course satisfies the Approach requirement.

Engl. 3730.01 – Literature and the Environment: “Cli-Fi: Contemporary Climate Fiction”
Teresa Goddu
TR – 2:35-3:50
This course surveys twenty-first century literary fiction that focuses on climate change. What to contemporary writers have to tell us about the natural, social, political, psychological, and cultural changes that we are currently or may soon experience? We will consider a range or cultural texts (literature, film, art, new media) that imagine worlds shaped by climate change and which offer ways to approach its challenges and possibilities. Texts may include: Ben Lerner, 10:40; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Karen Thompson Walker, The Age of Miracles, M.K. Jemisin, The Fifth Season; as well as an array of short stories, films, and non-fiction works.
This course satisfies the Approach requirement.

Engl. 3734.01 – Literature and Law: “Literature in the Time of Rights”
Mark Schoenfield
TR – 1:10-2:25
Law and legal thought structures civil society and penetrates into the very conceptualization of personhood and privacy, of our continually developing notion of the individual. Yet the individual was also theorized by literature, as novels and poems legitimized theories of the self and of social norms. In this course, we will explore the continual interchange between law and literature, seeking to understand not only how literature presents law, and how law depends upon literary forms of representation, but how the two discourses interact and intersect. We will consider the rise of rights talk as it filters into literature. Looking at Walter Scott’s Bride of Lammermoor, we will explore concepts of property and contract. Using William Godwin’s Caleb Williams, we will consider notions of criminality and guilt, revenge and justice. Reading Albert Camus’s The Stranger will lead us to consider the social rituals and transformations of the trial. In conjunction with these and other literary works, we will read cases and legal theory, and the course will culminate in final projects on topics, both contemporary and historical, reflecting student interests.
This is an Honors Seminar—a cumulative 3.4 GPA is required for admittance.
This course satisfies the Approach requirement.

Engl. 3890.01 – Movements in Literature: “Love Books”
Jessie Hock (co taught with Lynn Enterline)
TR – 2:35-3:50
What does it mean to write about love, beauty, and pleasure in the expectation that someone else will read what you’ve written? From a spiritual, even cosmological force to an embodied, even pornographic experience, “love” in the texts we will read in this class is a highly diverse phenomenon. However varied, the idea of love allows poets and philosophers to explore what it means to write—or read—about subjectivity and emotion. We will begin with four of the most influential ancient authors (Plato, Lucretius, Virgil, and Ovid) who link desire to the forces of unreason, violence, madness, and poetic fantasy. The rest of the course will follow medieval and renaissance writers in Italy, France, and England as they adopt or challenge ancient models. We will pay particular attention to the rise of a new tradition of love as a form of lyric autobiography, in which male authors depict love as a kind of “secret wound” or poetic “madness.” We will also pay attention to articulations of female pleasure, desire, and sexual experiences that emerge within this tradition. Finally, we will explore “libertine” movements in which narratives about apparently “deviant” lovers enable social critique and dissent.
Readings will include texts by Plato, Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Petrarch, Wroth, Labe, Shakespeare, Marvell, Behn, and more, and will span a wide range of genres, including epic, lyric, dramatic, narrative, epistolary, and philosophical prose. Students will become acquainted with ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literary and cultural history, while also fine-tuning their critical reading and writing skills. Course requirements include active class participation, a variety of short assignments, a midterm, and a final essay.

Engl. 3890.02 – Movements in Literature: “The New Negro Movement”
Gabriel Briggs
MWF – 12:10-1:00
This course examines the literary and cultural factors that influence the development of a modern African American identity by reconstructing the emergence of the “New Negro.” In the 1920s, the term New Negro entered general parlance to denote a modern form of African-American racial representation. The emergence of this African-American identity is different from the compliant, rural and under-educated African American who preceded the New Negro, as well, from the negative racial stereotypes created by whites or drawn from the romantic racialism of white fiction writers. New Negroes self-identified as progressive, urban figures with cultural and intellectual sensibilities generally connected to the period between World War I and World War II. Our analysis will trace the evolution of New Negro thought from its political origins in the late nineteenth-century through its radicalization in the World War I era, and will conclude with its more conservative, cultural transformation during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Students will work toward developing strategies for positioning authors and texts within specific cultural, historical, and theoretical contexts, and should be willing to experiment with new ways of reading literary and cultural texts. Among the numerous selections we will read are works by Anna Julia Cooper, W. E. B. Du Bois, Fannie Barrier Williams, Booker T. Washington, Elise McDougal, Sutton Griggs, Nella Larsen, and Langston Hughes.
This course satisfies this Diverse Perspective requirement.

Engl. 3891.01 – Special Topics in Creative Writing:“What’s So Funny?: An Investigation”
Lorrie Moore
W – 12:10-3:00
A look at literary texts from Shakespeare to Toni Cade Bambara to discover how literary humor is used in writing. What are the mechanics of making it occur? What are its various attributes and categories and sub-species? What are the underlying theories in practice? This is not a lecture course but an intensive reading and discussion course—class presentations and quizzes required but only a little writing.

Engl. 3892.01 – Problems in Literature:“Heterodox Visions: Marlowe, Blake, and Ginsberg”
Roger Moore
TR – 9:35-10:50
This course explores three revolutionary poets—Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), William Blake (1757-1827), and Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997)—all of whom exalt the spiritual power and potential of humankind. Marlowe, Blake, and Ginsberg were rebels who chafed against the social, sexual, and religious constraints of their times and turned to radical, heterodox spiritual traditions for inspiration and solace. We will place their works within appropriate historical context (for Marlowe, the English Reformation; for Blake, the Enlightenment French Revolution; for Ginsberg, post-World War II American prosperity) and will examine them in light of the mystical literature which fired these poets’ imaginations. Our readings will include Marlowe’s Tamburlaine plays as well as Edward II and Doctor Faustus, Blake’s Marriage of Heaven and Hell, The Book of Urizen, and various lyric poems and fragments, and selected poems and essays by Ginsberg. Requirements will include two papers, a mid-term exam, and a research project.
This course satisfies the Approach requirement.

Engl. 3898.03 – Special Topics in English and American Literature:“Narrative of the Southern Poor”
Michael Kreyling
MWF – 1:10-2:00
For ye have the poor with you always, and whensoever ye will ye may do them good: but me ye have not always.” Gospel of Mark, 14:7
This well-worn passage from Mark has been used to justify doing nothing (or not much) about poverty—after all, the poor are “always” with us—and doing something “whensoever” we feel the pang. Recently, the narrative of income inequality (the 99% and the 1%) has converted the story to numerical ratios rather than sonorous King James English. But the anxious narrative is still there.
To be brief: in the social and cultural history of the U.S., the South has often stood in for the poor person and poverty as a narrative. In the 17th century, the European colonists of New England might have had little, but the (white) lubbers and crackers of the Carolinas had less, and seemed not at all inclined to adopt a work ethic and improve their circumstances. In the South more than in other parts of the U.S., slavery welded poverty to racial division, a bond that hasn’t yet been totally cracked. And so white Americans tend to hear “poor” and “black” as synonyms. In the 20th century, white sharecroppers became the intractable poor—deeply resistant to modern economic change, often violently resistant to efforts to improve their lot in life, and sometimes even picturesque in their suffering. They were “always” poor. Even when they got some wealth, they were still easy to spot: rednecks, hillbillies, trailer trash embodied something indelibly white and poor.
During this course we will explore the entwined narratives where moral obligation, social planning, cultural observation, race, and artistic representation overlap in our apparent understanding of the poor in the U.S. The south is to be the focus, but discussion will not be restricted to just one region.
The reading is various, and predominantly literary. The following is just a sample: (fiction) William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying; Lee Smith, Oral History; Wendell Berry, Hannah Coulter; and Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird. (nonfiction) Michael Harrington, The Other America; Nancy Isenberg, White Trash; James Agee and Walker Evans, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men; Paul Theroux, Deep South, and J. D. Vance, Hillbilly Elegy. (film and television) The Andy Griffith Show and The Waltons.


4000-Level Courses:


Engl. 4960.01 – Senior Year Capstone:“Shakespeare, Or Not”
Kathryn Schwarz
TR – 2:35-3:50
This is not a course about Shakespeare. We will read a few Shakespearean texts across the arc of the semester: Richard III, Hamlet, The Tempest, The Sonnets. But we will use these texts, and the later responses that constellate around them, to think about our own active, changeable relationships to creative expression. Why do canonical works inspire the production of so many works that may or may not be recognized as literature? How might we connect this inventive, often irreverent response, in which reading catalyzes further acts of original writing, to the response presumed by our own processes of learning? We will take the complex, multifaceted afterlife of ‘Shakespeare’ as a fulcrum for conversations about what demands we make on literature, and what demands literature might make on us. Our readings will be loosely tethered to the idea of Shakespearean adaptation, but will range widely: ‘literary’ fiction and detective fiction; critical commentaries, historical artifacts, and pedagogical tools; films and other visual media; cross-cultural revisions and parodic appropriations. For any given class, you might read an anthropologist’s account of explaining Hamlet to an audience who does not share her culture’s assumptions, or you might watch YouTube videos in which people interpret Shakespeare’s sonnets, or you might read excerpts from Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own, or you might write a new story for a Shakespearean character. Our shared purpose is to illuminate dynamic links between our investment in literature and our analytical, creative participation in the world beyond the classroom.
Note: The Senior Capstone is open to all English majors who are interested regardless of whether in the old or new major. 

Engl. 4960.02 – Senior Year Capstone:“Tales (Re)Told”
Julie Fesmire
TR – 1:10-2:25
Greek, Latin, and Biblical literature used to be part of everyone’s education. Joseph Campbell, in The Power of Myth, has argued that to the extent these texts have been lost, a whole tradition of Occidental mythological information is lost:
It used to be that these stories were in the minds of people.  When the story is in your mind, then you see its relevance to something happening in your own life.  It gives you perspective on what’s happening to you.  With the loss of that, we’ve really lost something because we don’t have a comparable literature to take its place. These bits of information from ancient times, which have to do with the themes that have supported human life, built civilizations, and informed religions over the millennia, have to do with deep inner problems, inner mysteries, inner thresholds of passage, and if you don’t know what the guidesigns are along the way, you have to work it out for yourself.
The texts I have chosen for this class will, I hope, provide an opportunity for us to learn something about how literature has developed and changed from classical antiquity.  Our task, of course, is to decide whether Professor Campbell is correct or whether subsequent literature builds on and adds to the classical traditions.  We will use a variety of critical methodologies to examine the texts, focusing specifically on what each tells us about the culture in which it was created.
To that end we will examine a number of pairings:  the epic of Gilgamesh and the film Pulp Fiction; The Tragedy of Sohráb and Rostám and The Kite Runner; Hamlet and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead; Northanger Abbey and Atonement; Madame Bovary and Flaubert’s Parrot.
Note: The Senior Capstone is open to all English majors who are interested regardless of whether in the old or new major. 

Engl. 4999.01 – Honors Thesis
Teresa Goddu
M – 3:10-5:00