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Spring 2016

Spring 2016 Undergraduate Course Descriptions:

 Dear Students,

Verify course selections in "Your Enrollment Services" (YES) to see the complete selection of course dates and times.

You will need to meet with your Adviser IN PERSON before your registration appointment window, at which time, your Adviser will release an electronic academic hold on your account so that you can register.

Please e-mail your Adviser for an appointment.

The name of your Adviser, as well as the time of your registration appointment window, is listed on your YES landing page.

Instructors, sections, and topics for 1000-level writing courses are subject to change after the course request period, depending on enrollments.

Admittance to Honors sections and 3000-level Creative Writing workshops are subject to instructor approval.

Please refer to the individual course listings for specific instructions.

NOTE:  The descriptions that appear below for Spring 2016 are grouped by course. If you do not find your section number, it likely means that the instructor has not yet provided a course description. The webmaster will continue to make every effort to update this page, so check back often.


 If you are making selections to fulfill requirements for the Old Major , these courses meet the Pre-Eighteen Hundred Literature Major and Minor requirement:

ENGL 2310;  ENGL 2318;  ENGL 3310;  ENGL 3316;  ENGL 3340W;  ENGL 3348;  ENGL 3364;  ENGL 3370;  ENGL 3890.01

 

If you are making selections to fulfill requirements for the Old Major , these courses meet the Ethnic / Non-Western Literature Major and Minor requirement:

ENGL 3890.02;  ENGL 3892;  ENGL 3895.05;  ENGL 3898.02;  ENGL 3899;  ASIA 2100W;   JS 2250;  
JS 2260;  AMER 4100

 

If you are making selections to fulfill requirements for the New Major , these courses meet the History Literature Major and Minor requirement:

ENGL 2310;  ENGL 2318;  ENGL 3310;  ENGL 3316;  ENGL 3340W;  ENGL 3348;  ENGL 3364;  ENGL 3370;  ENGL 3890.01

 

If you are making selections to fulfill requirements for the New Major , these courses meet the Diverse Perspectives Literature Major and Minor requirement:

ENGL 3890.02;  ENGL 3892;   ENGL 3895.05;  ENGL 3898.02;   ENGL 3899;  ASIA 2100W;   JS 2550;  
JS 2260; AMER 4100

 

If you are making selections to fulfill requirements for the New Major , these courses meet the Approaches Major and Minor requirement:

ENGL 3720;  ENGL 3726;  ENGL 3740;  ENGL 3742;  ENGL 3890

 
 
ENGL 1100.01:  Composition
Chelsea Land 
This class is intended to help students improve their skills in critical writing and argumentation. Over the course of the semester, we will be exploring a variety of different argument styles in non-fiction works, including essays, personal accounts, and documentaries. There will also be some dabbling in fictional "arguments" to look at ways that narrative may be used persuasively. These readings will provide examples and topics of discussion that will be used as inspiration for your own attempts to use different styles of persuasive wiring. My primary interest in this class is for students of all disciplines to use the skills they learn in whatever way will serve them best with their writing goals, and so many of the class readings will be chosen based on student interests. To allow for maximum skills development, we will be writing 3-4 essays (including a couple of revisions) which comprise the majority of your grade, but our class time will also be supplemented by occasional short writing assignments to help you think through our discussions more effectively. In addition to writing practice and discussion, we will also devote considerable time to work-shopping and peer review. These kinds of activities are designed to grow student skills in editing and revising their own work and that of others. By the end of the semester, students may expect to have attained greater skill and confidence in persuasive writing that will help prepare them for higher level classes.
 
ENGL 1111   First-Year Writing Seminar:
 
ENGL 1111.04:   First Year Writing Seminar
Jane Wanninger
MWF 10:10
 
ENGL 1111.10:   First Year Writing Seminar
Kathryn Schwarz
TR 4:00
 
ENGL 1111.46:   First Year Writing Seminar
Michael Alijewicz
MWF 9:10
 
ENGL 1111.48:   First-Year Writing Seminar: Smuggling Words: The Art of Translation
Aubrey Porterfield
MWF 9:10
This course on modern fiction and poetry in translation addresses the following questions. What is translation? How does changing the language of a text also change its meaning? How do events such as migration, revolution, and technological innovation shape our answers to these questions? We will read literature by Vietnamese-Canadian, Haitian, and Welsh authors as well as non-fiction essays about translation, creativity, and authorship. With the goal of enriching and improving our own writing, we will consider how small acts of intercultural and interpersonal translation function in our everyday lives.
 
ENGL 1210W  Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques:
 
ENGL 1210.01:  Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Queer(ing) Rage
Joseph Jordan 
TR 9:35
What happens when queerness meets rage? How should we engage the vehement poetics and rhetoric of those who identify and/or are positioned as LGBTQIA…? When queer identities are all the rage, can something like queer rage still be political? Should it be? And if so, to what end? With these questions in mind, this course explores the entanglement of queerness, rage and resentment. The point of this course is neither anger management—yet, this may be one of its unintended consequences — nor celebration (although some celebration is certainly in order!). Instead, we will primarily challenge our assumptions about anger by analyzing, for example, Audre Lorde’s pragmatic defense and embrace of anger in “The Uses of Anger,” holocaust survivor Jean Amery's essay "Resentment," and representations of the Stonewall riots. For this writing intensive course students are expected to become apprentices in the lost art of the polemic. Our readings will be used as resources to hone our writing skills, especially our writerly voice and the structure of argumentation. As such, the instructor welcomes in particular those who seek to essay their words in FIRE.
 
ENGL 1210.02:  Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: The Essay and the Novel
James Phelan
TR 1:10
English 1210 is a kind of conversation between two genres: a class in essay writing whose subject matter is prose fiction. In this section, we will attend to the different ways those genres work and the different kinds of work they do by studying some authors who excel in both genres. We will read their essays and their novels; compare, contrast, and analyze them; and use the essays to guide our conversations about the required writing for the class, which will focus on the novels.
 
ENGL 1210W.03:  Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Apocalypse: Literature at the End of the World
Weitske Smeele
TR 8:10
What does the end of the world look like? 1999 saw the world gripped by Y2K fears; 2012 sent waves of apocalypse-anxiety around the globe; and unusual climate activity is forcing us to think about humans’ place on our planet. This class will explore prose fiction representations of the end of the world as we know it, and examine the question: what happens when the world ends? We will investigate theories of trauma surrounding apocalypse, the role of the human in instigating the end of the world, and what role human perspective plays in representations of apocalypse. Beginning with the biblical narratives of apocalypse, we will trace the evolution apocalyptic literature both as a genre and in tandem with social and political moments. Texts such as H.G. Wells’ The War of the Worlds (1898), Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake (2004), and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road (2006), among others, will allow us to trace the influence of extra-terrestrial life, climate change, and biological warfare on representations of the end of the world.  
 
ENGL 1210W.05:  Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Feeling Prose
Adam Miller
MWF 2:10
This course concerns itself with two ways of thinking about the relationship between prose and feeling. The first asks students to think about texts that make "feeling" one of their principle tropes (e.g., Equiano's Interesting Narrative, Radcliffe's A Sicilian Romance, and Austen's Northanger Abbey). The second asks students to think about the feeling, experience, or phenomenology of reading prose (in contrast to poetry or drama). Is the prose form necessarily more or less rational than its literary counterparts? Does it express feeling or sentiment in a unique way? In addition to reading about feeling in prose texts, this course also encourages students to produce their own "feeling" prose in both critical and personal essays (though the two are not mutually exclusive).
 
ENGL 1210W.06:  Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Monsters in Fiction
Justin Quarry
TR 2:35
In this course, we will explore portrayals of various monsters—both realistic and fantastic—in fictions ranging from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries and analyze the elements of fiction used to illuminate them and in turn the societal anxieties and desires in the midst of which they appear.  Over our months together, we will attempt to define, and redefine, what, or who, exactly, a “monster” is and what makes such a creature simultaneously horrifying and fascinating, and we will examine novels, graphic novels, and short stories in order to determine the terms by which so-called monsters are understood and described, and what beyond the norm these creatures represent, both literally and metaphorically, in each encounter.
 
Moreover, the aim of this course is to teach you to think critically about literature, and so we also will devote a significant amount of time to focusing on the writing process by way of close reading, discussion, and writing assignments.  Throughout the semester, you will practice analyzing and critiquing our selected literary works in three essays as well as several reading responses and in-class writing assignments, each intended to help you more clearly and more persuasively present your arguments by basing them on textual evidence.
 
ENGL 1220W  Drama: Forms and Techniques:
 
ENGL 1220W.01:  Drama: Forms and Techniques: Blood, Gore, and Applause: Interpreting Violence in Drama
Amanda Lehr
TR 9:35
What does it mean to stage violence as a spectacle? How do we read the traumatized bodies that we have chosen to look upon? Why do we consider real-world violence in terms of “acts” and refer to war zones as “theaters”? In this class, we will consider the intellectual, aesthetic, and ethical challenges of portraying violence onstage and in film. As we examine texts ranging from Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus to Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds, our discussions will explore the visible “languages” of suffering bodies, the thin line between viewers’ horror and pleasure, and the implications of our own consumption of violence as entertainment. Let there be blood.
 
ENGL 1220W.02:  Drama: Forms and Techniques
Judith Klass
TR 1:10
 
ENGL 1220W.03:  Drama: Forms and Techniques
Judith Klass
TR 4:00
 
ENGL 1220W.04:  Drama: Forms and Techniques
Staff
MWF 12:10
 
ENGL 1230W  Literature and Analytical Thinking:
 
ENGL 1230W.01:  Literature and Analytical Thinking: Climate Change Fiction, or: Love in the Time of the Anthropocene 
Jesse Montgomery
MWF 9:10
Global Warming threatens to change everything: where we live, how live, who we live with and for how long. As the reality of this crisis grows more certain with each report by the Intergovernmental Climate Change Panel and meeting of the United Nations Climate Change Conference the question of how to act grows more pressing. This class explores one response to the looming challenge of global warming: climate change fiction. In recent years, writers and filmmakers have taken up the issues raised by a warming world with an increased sense of urgency and over the course of the semester we will examine how these works of art grapple with the challenges presented by global climate change.  We will pay specific attention to how climate change and natural disasters affect human relationships and our ability to love another in both a romantic and communal sense. In order to do so we will analyze a wide range of literature that spans many genres, from Willa Cather to WALL-E to science-fiction and political thrillers. This class is also a writing intensive course designed to build and sharpen your analytic writing skills. As such, a significant portion of class time will be devoted to writing instruction and peer review.    
 
ENGL 1230W.02:  Literature and Analytical Thinking
Kylie Korsnack
MWF 10:10
 
ENGL 1230.03:  Literature and Analytical Thinking: Comedy as an Alternate History
Mariann J. VanDevere
MWF 10:10
This course seeks to look at comedy, particularly African-American comedy, as an alternate history.  This course is designed to analyze cultural and historical issues and events by close-reading arguments made in comedic discourses.  Cultural issues may include police brutality, jury bias, masculinity and femininity, politics and war, as well as several others.  Major themes include race, class, gender, and sexuality.  The syllabus will focus on comedians such as Richard Pryor, Moms Mabley, Dave Chappelle, Wanda Sykes, Eddie Murphy, Chris Rock, and many more.  DISCLAIMER:  The materials we will read and watch will be vulgar.  There will be profanity, racial slurs, homophobic slurs, and other types of potentially offensive content.  If you are not comfortable reading, watching, writing about, AND discussing this type of material, then this course is NOT for you.
 
ENGL 1230.04:  Literature and Analytical Thinking: Reading Neurotica: Desire, Rumination, and the Crush in Literature
Lauren Mitchell
MWF 11:10
‪In Lady Gaga's masterpiece, "Paparazzi," she proclaims, "I'm your biggest fan, I'll follow you until you love me." We're often conditioned to expect love stories that resolve in a neatly happy ending, complete with a white picket fence... Or in a great Romeo-and-Juliet-tragedy. But what about those times when the love stories are one-sided? What happens when desire doesn't become fulfilled and begins to grow, blob-like, into an obsession on its own?  If we read love stories by focusing on the narrator, we often find that what looks like love from the outside, turns out to be neurotic rumination and fantasy-building on the inside. And you know what? We've all been there. 
Texts may include In the Cage, Kiss of the Spider Woman, Passing, and Oryx and Crake, among others (but please keep in mind that this list is tentative). As the primary goal of this course will emphasize skills in critical writing, students will engage with literature to develop clear arguments and to ground them with textual evidence.  Students are welcome to consider relevant topics from their primary disciplines or majors into class discussions and their written work.
 
ENGL 1230W.05:  Literature and Analytical Thinking: Seeing Anew: The Many Faces of Epiphany
Sari Carter
MWF 9:10
What is personal change? How does such change happen, and how do different ways of change influence a person’s identity? James Joyce called the phenomenon of a sudden insight or change of perspective an epiphany, defining it as “the most delicate and evanescent of moments.” Epiphanies seem mysterious, unpredictable, fleeting away as soon as they arrive, unbound by time. Yet time also is an essential condition of change: the continuum of experience before and after the moment of epiphany makes it meaningful, gives it context and resonance, even as that context receives back echoes of new meaning from the epiphany. So how do people refine perspectives (over time) even as they gain sudden insights (in a moment)? How do they let those insights influence their actions? This course will examine these questions through a variety of authors, predominantly from the long nineteenth century, an era of radical cultural change whose influence is still felt in the present. We will investigate how these authors have sought to understand methods and meanings of personal change, and in this context, we will also investigate the role of writing in change, learning to craft our own writing to convey analysis in a way that can effect change or insight for an audience.
 
ENGL 1230W.06:  Literature and Analytical Thinking: War as History: War Literature and the Individual
Alex Oxner
TR 9:35
Most of us have lived through a war (or perhaps “wars”) for the majority of our lifetime – and the climate of perpetual war has left a lasting impact on our psyches, both consciously and unconsciously. Through a narrative arc spanning from the early twentieth-century with the beginning of The Great War through to contemporary issues with which we may be more familiar, this writing-intensive course will explore the tensions between literature (arguably a medium of creation) and war (a destructive force). These tensions speak to larger issues surrounding representation (racially, socially, economically, regarding gender, etc.), time and memory, violence and visuality, childhood and maturation, the language of psychology, and more. This course will ask you to explore how war influences configurations of individual identity within larger, looming models of collectivity such as the military and foreign/international communities.
 
ENGL 1230W.07:  Literature and Analytical Thinking: Going Places: Travel Fiction Then and Now in British Literature
Rachel Gould
TR 9:35
“Undoubtedly, philosophers are in the right when they tell us that nothing is great or little otherwise than by comparison.”  ― Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels
We frequently describe the world around us through binary divisions: local and global, East and West, public and private. But how did we create these lines and what happens to them when we come face-to-face with other cultures? When we travel away from our culture and into another, how do we respond to different expressions of living and different patterns of thinking? Through the study of British fiction, travel narratives, and other genres, this course will engage Britain within a global context. We will journey with British authors to and through other nations, real or imaginary, as they explore issues of nationalism, race, economics, and religion. Readings and class writings will cover Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s Turkish Embassy Letters, J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, and other texts depicting accounts of travel.
 
ENGL 1230W.08:   Literature and Analytical Thinking 
Kathleen DeGuzman
TR 11:00
 
ENGL 1230W.09 Literature and Analytical Thinking: On the Road: Travel, Food, and Analytical Thinking
Dan Fang
TR 1:10
This course takes up the topic of travel in order to teach writing and analytical thinking. We will read and watch a variety of travel stories, from Gulliver’s Island to Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern. These works will allow us to think critically about how we encounter those places and people foreign to us; about what kinds of preconceived notions we have about them; and about the larger societal structures that can be called into question in the tensions between the familiar and the exotic. The course will also involve a fair amount of writing, both nonfictional and analytical.
 
ENGL 1230W.10:   Literature and Analytical Thinking
Stephanie Straub
TR 4:00
 
ENGL 1230W.11:  Literature and Analytical Thinking: Getting Pleasure: Literary Representations of Coercion and Violence from the 16th to the 21st Century
Kirsten Mendoza
TR 4:00
“It is always by way of pain one arrives at pleasure.”—Marquis de Sade from Philosophy in the Bedroom
To what extremes will you go to get your pleasure? At what point does the pursuit of sexual gratification become immoral, tabooed, and pathological? Throughout the semester, we will examine the intersections of gender, power, and destruction with particular attention to the ways in which the language of sexuality carries an implicit violence that problematically undermines the distinctions between consensual and coercive interactions. The course will follow chronological order, beginning with early modern works such as Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece and Middleton and Rowley’s notorious Jacobean tragedy, The Changeling.  Short novels by the Marquis de Sade and Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo will also be read as we explore the manifold anxieties and fantasies surrounding sexual domination and subjugation.
 
ENGL 1230W.12:   Literature and Analytical Thinking
Claudia Ludwig
TR 8:10
What makes us desire revenge and why are we so entertained by it? This course will trace the evolution of the revenge tragedy genre from its classical roots, to its peak in the early modern period, to the contemporary manifestations of it in popular culture. Sources for this course may include Medea, Hamlet, The Changeling, and Kill Bill.
 
ENGL 1230W.13:   Literature and Analytical Thinking
Max Baumkel
MWF 10:10
In this course, we will learn and hone the skills of academic argumentation and analytical writing by looking closely at literary and cultural texts, including short stories, video games, journalism, music, television, and movies.  The content of this course is focused on the intersection of writing, bodies, and digital technology.  We will begin our exploration of this intersection with discussions of the craft of writing and argument, in which we will think about how our regular engagement with digital technology simultaneously shapes the arguments we make and how we inhabit our bodies.  As part of our discussion of craft, we will also consider how our bodies shape the form of our arguments and the ways in which we interact with digital technology.  Along the way, we will delve into more conceptual questions such as: What is a natural body?  What are the boundaries of a body?  To what extent are digital technologies now a part of our corporeality?  Many of the course texts that we will use to think through these questions will be authored by queer and trans people, people with disabilities, and people of color.
 
ENGL 1250W  Introduction to Poetry:
 
ENGL 1250W.01:  Introduction To Poetry 
Nancy Roche
MWF 9:10
The purpose of this course is to enhance your understanding and appreciation of poetry by introducing you to a wide range of poems from different time frames and poetry movements.  To this end, we will examine poems written from the Renaissance to the present, which not only focus on traditional poetic subjects such as the contemplation of love and nature, but also the complexities of war and politics, race and gender, and transcendence.  We will study form and content, and work to determine how a poem achieves its power and lyric.  We will consider how poetry engages with and reflects—or rejects and criticizes—the world the poet observes.  To accomplish these goals, you will participate in close readings of individual poems, group discussions of styles, forms, and movements of poetry, and in written analysis to improve your writing skills.
 
ENGL 1250W.02:  Introduction To Poetry 
Charles Cosner
MWF 10:10
 
ENGL 1250W.03:  Introduction to Poetry
Lisa Dordal
MWF 11:10
The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, imagery, figures of speech, sound, rhythm, etc.). The first part of the course also will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, and Langston Hughes. In the second half of the course, we will read and discuss Natasha Trethewey’s collection entitled Native Guard, Li-Young Lee’s collection entitled Book of My Nights and selections from Mark Doty’s collection Fire to Fire. Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), two brief class presentations, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions. 
 
ENGL 1250W.04:  Introduction To Poetry 
Charles Cosner
MWF 12:10
 
ENGL 1250W.05:  Introduction to Poetry
Lisa Dordal
MWF 12:10
The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, imagery, figures of speech, sound, rhythm, etc.). The first part of the course also will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, and Langston Hughes. In the second half of the course, we will read and discuss Natasha Trethewey’s collection entitled Native Guard, Li-Young Lee’s collection entitled Book of My Nights and selections from Mark Doty’s collection Fire to Fire. Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), two brief class presentations, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions. 
 
ENGL 1250W.06  Introduction To Poetry 
Charles Cosner
MWF 2:10
 
ENGL 1250W.07:  Introduction to Poetry
Lisa Dordal
MWF 3:10
The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, imagery, figures of speech, sound, rhythm, etc.). The first part of the course also will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, and Langston Hughes. In the second half of the course, we will read and discuss Natasha Trethewey’s collection entitled Native Guard, Li-Young Lee’s collection entitled Book of My Nights and selections from Mark Doty’s collection Fire to Fire. Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), two brief class presentations, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions. 
 
ENGL 1250W.06:  Introduction To Poetry 
Leah Marcus
TR 2:35
 
ENGL 1250W.09:  Introduction to Poetry: Modern and Contemporary Poetry of the U.S.
Keegan Finberg
MWF 11:10
This course will introduce students to poetry of the twentieth century and twenty-first century in order to study how poetic form takes on expressive and political power. The center of gravity for this course is poetry of the United States, but important conversations happen across borders, and thus we will read some Anglophone poetry from around the globe. Students will learn to read, discuss, and write critically about poetry through an exploration of the history and traditions of poetry and poetics in American literature, and through an exploration of modern to contemporary verse. They will become familiar with different poetic schools and movements, as well as the major debates about form and content. The course readings will run chronologically from pre-modernist radicals, Whitman and Dickinson, through various forms of literary modernism, the New Negro or Harlem Renaissance, Objectivism, Black Mountain poetry, the Beats, Confessionalism, the New York School, poetry of the Black Arts Movement, the rapid expansion of varieties of Native American, Asian American, and Latino / poetry after the 1960's, Language writing, and various twenty-first century forms such as conceptual writing. In addition to academic papers and presentations, students will engage in the process of poetic production and memorization.
 
ENGL 1250W.10:  Introduction to Poetry: Modern and Contemporary Poetry of the U.S.
Keegan Finberg
MWF 12:10
This course will introduce students to poetry of the twentieth century and twenty-first century in order to study how poetic form takes on expressive and political power. The center of gravity for this course is poetry of the United States, but important conversations happen across borders, and thus we will read some Anglophone poetry from around the globe. Students will learn to read, discuss, and write critically about poetry through an exploration of the history and traditions of poetry and poetics in American literature, and through an exploration of modern to contemporary verse. They will become familiar with different poetic schools and movements, as well as the major debates about form and content. The course readings will run chronologically from pre-modernist radicals, Whitman and Dickinson, through various forms of literary modernism, the New Negro or Harlem Renaissance, Objectivism, Black Mountain poetry, the Beats, Confessionalism, the New York School, poetry of the Black Arts Movement, the rapid expansion of varieties of Native American, Asian American, and Latino / poetry after the 1960's, Language writing, and various twenty-first century forms such as conceptual writing. In addition to academic papers and presentations, students will engage in the process of poetic production and memorization.
 
ENGL 1250W.11:  Introduction To Poetry 
Staff
TR 2:35
 
ENGL 1260W  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis:
 
ENGL 1260W.01:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Reading the Prison
Robbie Spivey
MWF 9:10
Why does the U.S. incarcerate so many of its citizens - more than any other nation in the world? What role does prison play in the national imagination? In this course we will explore answers to both questions by studying literature by and about prisoners. We'll consider, for example, the autobiography and poetry of Jimmy Santiago Baca, who came to prison violent, angry, and illiterate, but left a visionary poet. We'll also consider prison poets who will never leave the prison alive, yet use language to transcend their physical confinement and to bear witness to readers in the free world. Likewise, we will consider the culture and literary value of the prison memoir; our study will include Orange is the New Black, the memoir by Piper Kerman that inspired the popular Netflix series. We will also read and critique selections from Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punish as we try to understand the role of prison in our culture.
 
ENGL 1260W.02:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Adam Miller
MWF 10:10
Misdirection is a term after associated with magic and conjuring. It is sometimes conceptualized as a method of causing a spectator to look at "the wrong thing at the right time" so that the secret action of the trick goes unobserved. A more nuanced definition thinks of misdirection as a means of convincing the spectator that he or she is always looking at the right thing at the right time - thus making any trickery impossible. This course invokes both definitions as tropes for thinking about operations of culture. Can cultural operations and their artifacts (race, class, gender, capital, data, etc.) "misdirect" our attention? If so, how can we be certain that the aspects of our culture we consider to be important (the right thing at the tight time) are as operative as we think they are? In this course, we will examine misdirection in a variety of artistic ("twist" endings, the explained supernatural, conspiracy theories) and theoretical contexts (Baudrillard, Althusser, Marx, Butler), and with different attitudes (skeptical, credulous, ironic, etc.).
 
ENGL 1260W.04:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Gabriel Briggs
MWF 11:10
This course examines the depth and breadth of the cultural phenomenon known as the Harlem Renaissance. However, rather than view this episode as an isolated period of African-American expression, we will see how Renaissance era artistry extended an earlier “New Negro” tradition, and how it encapsulated African-American cultural responses to early twentieth-century social, political, and economic stimuli. As such, students will work toward developing strategies for positioning authors and texts within specific cultural, historical, and theoretical contexts. Within this diverse landscape we will investigate artists, essayists, poets, musicians, and novelists that include: W. E. B Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Alain Locke, Countee Cullen, Louis Armstrong, Claude McKay, Nella Larsen, Wallace Thurman and George Schuyler.
 
ENGL 1260W.05:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Adam Miller
MWF 12:10
Misdirection is a term after associated with magic and conjuring. It is sometimes conceptualized as a method of causing a spectator to look at "the wrong thing at the right time" so that the secret action of the trick goes unobserved. A more nuanced definition thinks of misdirection as a means of convincing the spectator that he or she is always looking at the right thing at the right time - thus making any trickery impossible. This course invokes both definitions as tropes for thinking about operations of culture. Can cultural operations and their artifacts (race, class, gender, capital, data, etc.) "misdirect" our attention? If so, how can we be certain that the aspects of our culture we consider to be important (the right thing at the tight time) are as operative as we think they are? In this course, we will examine misdirection in a variety of artistic ("twist" endings, the explained supernatural, conspiracy theories) and theoretical contexts (Baudrillard, Althusser, Marx, Butler), and with different attitudes (skeptical, credulous, ironic, etc.).
 
ENGL 1260W.06:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Kathleen DeGuzman
TR 8:10
 
ENGL 1260W.07:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Kathleen DeGuzman
TR 1:10
 
ENGL 1260W.08:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: The Real American Dilemma: Forms of Antiracism in American Literature and Culture
Andy Hines
TR 2:35
In the opening pages of The American Dilemma, a massive 1944 study of race relations in the U.S. commissioned by the Carnegie Corporation, Gunnar Myrdal asserts that "the American Negro problem is a problem in the heart of the American". Myrdal's study has played a significant part in affirming and supporting the idea that the surface-level solution to anti-black racism has been to change hearts and then minds. Over seventy years later, this course challenges the persistent idea that the course and solution of racism is solely affective and individual. Instead, we will pursue through literature, film, philosophy, and theory the idea that racism conditions a number of governing institutions and systems. To question anti-black racism as not just a structure of feeling, but a constitutive structure of American life, we must ask questions about capitalism, criminal justice, and even the ways of knowing and being in the world. Because many of these ideas challenge many common-sense understandings of anti-black racism in the U.S. and abroad, students will learn to write and support controversial arguments about the relationship of literature and culture to essential social issues. We will read texts by Angela Davis, Ta-Nahesi Coates, James Baldwin, Ida B. Wells, Claudia Rankine, and Fred Moten among many others. Ultimately we will seek the solution in literature and culture for what may be the real American Dilemma: the inability to broadly acknowledge the systematic and structural aspects that condition anti-black racism in the twenty-first century.
 
ENGL 1260W.09:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Literary to Cinematic Adaptations
Nancy Roche
TR 9:35
This course seeks to establish an understanding of the relationship between literary texts and their cinematic counterparts. Through the study of plays, short fiction, novels, children’s literature, graphic novels, and foreign films, students will discern principles governing the process of cinematic adaptation. We will review narrative theory and structure, map changes in plotlines due to particular strategies of filmmakers, and observe cultural differences in foreign to domestic adaptations.  Elements of film art such as cinematography, mise-en-scene, lighting, use of color, costuming, computer generated imagery, and editing will be closely examined.
Focusing on the postmodern era, this class examines adaptation in the form of traditional, mainstream Hollywood film and low-budget, Independent Cinema. In order to scrutinize methods of narrative construction, we will consider stories which are manipulated to fit the objectives, methodology, and means of cinematic production. An analysis of specific literary texts, along with close observation of the films they generate, will allow us to judge the efficacy and merit of their content.  Possible works include: Much Ado About Nothing, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner), Fight ClubThe Virgin Suicides, Ghost World, Breakfast At Tiffany’s and Coraline .
 
ENGL 1260W.10:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Murder and Mayhem: Crime and Punishment in Popular Culture
Dan Fang
TR 11:00
Murder is one of the most heinous acts a human can do to another being; it is also a topic that fascinates our society endlessly, appearing in a thousand different iterations throughout history. In this course, we will explore crime and detective stories in various forms: fiction, nonfiction, film, television show, and even board games. Throughout this semester, we will think critically about the structure of narratives about crime, especially murder; about the various thematic implications of making stories about crime; and how those implications extend more broadly to our daily lives and the institutions around us.
 
ENGL 1260W.11:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Literary to Cinematic Adaptations
Nancy Roche
TR 1:10
This course seeks to establish an understanding of the relationship between literary texts and their cinematic counterparts. Through the study of plays, short fiction, novels, children’s literature, graphic novels, and foreign films, students will discern principles governing the process of cinematic adaptation. We will review narrative theory and structure, map changes in plotlines due to particular strategies of filmmakers, and observe cultural differences in foreign to domestic adaptations.  Elements of film art such as cinematography, mise-en-scene, lighting, use of color, costuming, computer generated imagery, and editing will be closely examined.
Focusing on the postmodern era, this class examines adaptation in the form of traditional, mainstream Hollywood film and low-budget, Independent Cinema. In order to scrutinize methods of narrative construction, we will consider stories which are manipulated to fit the objectives, methodology, and means of cinematic production. An analysis of specific literary texts, along with close observation of the films they generate, will allow us to judge the efficacy and merit of their content.  Possible works include: Much Ado About Nothing, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner), Fight ClubThe Virgin Suicides, Ghost World, Breakfast At Tiffany’s and Coraline .
 
ENGL 1260W.12:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Cecelia Tichi
TR 1:10
 
ENGL 1260W.13 Murder and Mayhem: Crime and Punishment in Popular Culture
Dan Fang
TR 4:00
Murder is one of the most heinous acts a human can do to another being; it is also a topic that fascinates our society endlessly, appearing in a thousand different iterations throughout history. In this course, we will explore crime and detective stories in various forms: fiction, nonfiction, film, television show, and even board games. Throughout this semester, we will think critically about the structure of narratives about crime, especially murder; about the various thematic implications of making stories about crime; and how those implications extend more broadly to our daily lives and the institutions around us.
 
ENGL 1260W.14:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Reading the Prison
Robbie Spivey
MWF 10:10
Why does the U.S. incarcerate so many of its citizens - more than any other nation in the world? What role does prison play in the national imagination? In this course we will explore answers to both questions by studying literature by and about prisoners. We'll consider, for example, the autobiography and poetry of Jimmy Santiago Baca, who came to prison violent, angry, and illiterate, but left a visionary poet. We'll also consider prison poets who will never leave the prison alive, yet use language to transcend their physical confinement and to bear witness to readers in the free world. Likewise, we will consider the culture and literary value of the prison memoir; our study will include Orange is the New Black, the memoir by Piper Kerman that inspired the popular Netflix series. We will also read and critique selections from Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punish as we try to understand the role of prison in our culture.
 
ENGL 1260W.15:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Staff
MWF 9:10
 
ENGL 1260W.16:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Rebecca Chapman
MWF 11:10
 
ENGL 1260W.17:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Postwar Experimental Literature and the Arts
Keegan Finberg
MWF 3:10
This class focuses on innovative, genre-bending, multi-media texts of the postwar period and the historical and political contests in which they were produced. At the mid-twentieth century, distinctions between literary genres and artistic media became more flexible and porous, creating new categories for characterizing experimental works such as "verbal arts", "event scores", "conceptual art", or even "theatricality", and "arts in general". This new categorization called for new modes of reading that were process-based, open-ended, and interdisciplinary. What does the term "experimental" mean when it comes to literature? To answer this question, our course pursues a radically interdisciplinary approach, examining inter-arts works that experiment with new possibilities of perception, spaces, and aesthetic forms. This approach allows us to attend to an expanded range of cultural, artistic, and intellectual practices including performance, visual arts, architecture, political activity, and even mathematical algorithms. We will primarily cover networks of texts and artworks produced in the U.S., but we will uphold a global frame in our discussions. Students will become familiar with modernist and contemporary textual and multi-media production; engage theories of the avant-guard, experimentalism, and interdisciplinarity; engage in meaningful discussion about twentieth-century literature and verbal-based arts; as well as sharpen skills and techniques in argumentation, comparative analysis, interpretation, modes of inquiry, and close reading. Readings include scripts and scores by Fluxus artists, texts from the Black Arts Movement, feminist performance art, constraint-generated poetry, multi-form novels, and conceptual writing.
 
ENGL 1260W.18:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: The Real American Dilemma: Forms of Antiracism in American Literature and Culture
Andy Hines
TR 1:10
In the opening pages of The American Dilemma, a massive 1944 study of race relations in the U.S. commissioned by the Carnegie Corporation, Gunnar Myrdal asserts that "the American Negro problem is a problem in the heart of the American". Myrdal's study has played a significant part in affirming and supporting the idea that the surface-level solution to anti-black racism has been to change hearts and then minds. Over seventy years later, this course challenges the persistent idea that the course and solution of racism is solely affective and individual. Instead, we will pursue through literature, film, philosophy, and theory the idea that racism conditions a number of governing institutions and systems. To question anti-black racism as not just a structure of feeling, but a constitutive structure of American life, we must ask questions about capitalism, criminal justice, and even the ways of knowing and being in the world. Because many of these ideas challenge many common-sense understandings of anti-black racism in the U.S. and abroad, students will learn to write and support controversial arguments about the relationship of literature and culture to essential social issues. We will read texts by Angela Davis, Ta-Nahesi Coates, James Baldwin, Ida B. Wells, Claudia Rankine, and Fred Moten among many others. Ultimately we will seek the solution in literature and culture for what may be the real American Dilemma: the inability to broadly acknowledge the systematic and structural aspects that condition anti-black racism in the twenty-first century.
 
ENGL 1260.19:  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Tatiana McInnis
TR 4:00
In “Apocalypse: What Disasters Reveal” Junot Diaz, building on work by James Berger and David Brooks claims that “Apocalyptic catastrophes don’t just raze cities and drown coastlines; these events, … ‘wash away the surface of society, the settled way things have been done. They expose the underlying power structures, the injustices, the patterns of corruption and the unacknowledged inequalities.’ And, equally important, they allow us insight into the conditions that led to the catastrophe, whether we are talking about Haiti or Japan.” Diaz’s essay is the foundational intervention that will structure this course. Throughout the semester, we will analyze literary, journalistic, and filmic representations of natural disasters to see what these representations reveal. In so doing, we will interrogate the relationship between natural and manmade disasters and deepen our comprehension of the interrelated roles power, race, and neocolonialism play in the world today. We will focus specifically on representations of the 2010 Haitian earthquake, Hurricane Katrina’s impact on the US South, and the Fukushima nuclear meltdown as a result of the 2011 tsunami. As such, while the course will include novels and short stories and other traditional examples of literature, it seeks to expand the definition of literature to encourage interrogation of mediums of communication and to inspire cultural awareness.
 
ENGL 1270W  Introduction to Literary Criticism:
 
ENGL 1270W.01:  Introduction to Literary Criticism: Hannibal and Literary Theory
Kristen Navarro
TR 11:00
This course will introduce you to literary theory and criticism. Literary theory can be tricky to define, for, as Jonathan Culler writes in Literary Theory: A Short Introduction, "the nature of theory is to undo, through a contesting of premisses and postulates, what you thought you knew." Throughout our discussions, we will be reevaluating exactly that, considering how language and literary narratives have shaped our consciousness. We will read a wide variety of theorists and critical thinkers over the course of the semester, covering branches of thought such as post-structuralist theory, psychoanalytic theory, feminist theory, and queer theory. Our conversations will be organized around one central literary text that we will engage throughout the whole semester: NBC's TV show Hannibal. How theory and literary texts speak to and through one another will be our ongoing (and perhaps unresolvable) focal question. 
 
ENGL 1270W.02:  Introduction to Literary Criticism: Writers, Readers, Texts, and Publics
Andy Hines
TR 11:00
What makes a work of literature? How does literature impact the world? How is literature shaped by the world? How does literature move? Literary criticism and theory provides the means for addressing these questions about the production and productivity of literature. This course supplies an introduction to the foremost concepts, questions, and practices of literary criticism while challenging the widely held notion that criticism is without use. The course readings and writing assignments focus on four key areas of literary critical inquiry: writers, readers, texts, and publics. In addition to encountering several approaches to each key area, students will consider the ways that these varies theories and methods are in conversation with other works of literature and literary criticism. Finally, like any good work of literary theory, the course troubles and rebuilds anew the foundation it was built upon. This means that students must question the privileged history of literary criticism and its institutions, as well as the stakes of certain defenses of criticism's boundaries. Readings include essays and excerpts by Butler, Derrida, Morrison, Marx, Sedgwick, and Foucault, among others. Written assignments require students to summarize difficult readings with clarity and concision, make arguments that are supported by forms of textual evidence, and read literature through a number of perspectives. 
 
ENGL 1280  Beginning Fiction Workshop:
 
ENGL 1280.01:  Beginning Fiction Workshop
Katie Foster
MWF 9:10           
This Beginning Fiction Workshop class will provide an introduction to the art of writing prose fiction. Students will read published works by a variety of authors, as well as the short fiction written by their peers. During workshop, students will learn the fundamentals of craft such as characterization, voice, pacing, and point of view. Using these elements of fiction, students will write original short stories to be peer reviewed in class. In workshop and in written form, students will provide constructive feedback on their classmates’ fiction in progress. Grading will be based on the following criteria: class participation, assignments, attendance, attendance of campus literary events, and a final portfolio of short fiction.
 
ENGL 1280.02:  Beginning Fiction Workshop
Laura Birdsall
TR 11:00
 
ENGL 1290  Beginning Poetry Workshop:
 
ENGL 1290.01:  Beginning Poetry Workshop
Destiny Birdsong
TR 9:35
 
ENGL 1290.02:  Beginning Poetry Workshop
Mary Sommerville    
TR 9:35                                                                                              
In this course, students will write their own poems, present them for critique, and critique the work of their peers. They will be introduced to the basic elements of the craft of poetry in order to develop a critical vocabulary, which will aid them in understanding their own work and the work of others. In conjunction with this discussion of poetic craft, the course will broadly trace the historical evolution of American poetics, starting with pre-colonial Native poetry and ending with the contemporary landscape. Students will be directly exposed to this world of contemporary literature by their attendance at events sponsored by the Vanderbilt Visiting Writers Series.
 
ENGL 2200  Foundations of Literary Study:
 
ENGL 2200.01:  Foundations of Literary Study
Rebecca Chapman
MWF 9:10
 
ENGL 2200.02:  Foundations of Literary Study
John Bradley
MWF 1:10
 
ENGL 2200.03:  Foundations of Literary Study: Law as Literature? Law and Literature?
Colin Dayan
TR 11:00
This course introduces you to the question of “foundations” of literary study through close reading and analysis of the “facts” of case law and the “fictions” of literature. Through an examination of legal, philosophical, and historical texts, as well as fictional re-enactments of servitude, incarceration, and criminality, especially, the seminar will examine varying fictions while presenting the diverse and contradictory images of law that intervene in everyday life. 

Questions to pursue:  How do narratives of the past get told by law?  How do legal fictions differ from literary fictions?  What is the relation between the status of “persons” in law and “character” in literature? How does legal reasoning produce ghosts of law, or the living dead? How do legal fictions work as literary metaphors?

Besides selected legal cases, our readings include: Charles Dickens, Alexander de Tocqueville, Thomas Jefferson, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, and William Faulkner.
 
ENGL 2200.04:  Foundations of Literary Study: What does Literature Know?                         
Vera M. Kutzinski                                                                                                    
TR 2:35
This course introduces you to interpretive skills and philosophical questions basic to the study of literature. As we move from short stories and poetry (written by well-known authors and, occasionally, by yourselves) to drama, the novel, film, and graphic narrative, we will identify and examine different aspects of what makes a text ‘literary.’ A series of questions will guide your work during discussions and in writing: What is literary form? How do readers experience it? How does it relate to theme? What kinds of knowledge does literary form produce? Why is this knowledge important to us? How does a writer create new forms? In addition to gaining familiarity with some of the theoretical concepts in the field of literary studies, you will learn how to apply rhetorical terms precisely; undertake research to reinforce, enrich, and complicate your own arguments; and engage literature creatively. Required readings include short stories (Douglas Kearney, Julio Cortázar, and Bharati Mukherjee); poetry (T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes); a play and a film (Tennessee Williams, The Glass Menagerie); two novels (Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises, and Robert Antoni, Carnival); and graphic narrative (Julian Peters, Nick Sousanis). The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms, as well as other critical and theoretical concepts in short excerpts will accompany the primary material. Written requirements: several short response papers; two essays (1,000-1,200 words each); and a final research project.
 
ENGL 2200.05:  Foundations of Literary Study                       
Michael Kreyling                                                                                                
TR 1:10
 
 
ENGL 2310.01:  Representative British Writers
Andrea Hearn
MWF 10:10
This course will introduce students to the foundations of English literature in its first thousand years of development: from Beowulf to Paradise Lost, we will read representative works covering major (and many minor) writers, movements, genres, and techniques.  We will pay particular attention to the relationship of our readings to their specific moments—their political, social, economic, religious, and cultural contexts.  This is a thrilling span of English history: from Viking raids, the Norman Conquest, and the Hundred Years War; from Agincourt, the Wars of the Roses, and the defeat of the Spanish Armada; to the Pilgrims at Plymouth, the Civil Wars, the Restoration, and the Great Fire of London.  The literature is correspondingly various and exciting, moving from epics through romances, dramas, and sonnet sequences, and back to epics again.  Major readings (in whole or in part) will include BeowulfThe Canterbury TalesMorte d’Arthur, one of Shakespeare’s history plays, and Paradise Lost.  In addition to vigorous class discussion, the course will require a variety of writing assignments, including directed exercises, two exams, and two essays, and a group dramatic presentation.
 
 
ENGL 2311.01:  Representative British Writers: British Writers 1660 - Present
Roy Gottfried
MWF 9:10
A survey of the major poets in English Literature from the Restoration and the 18th century, the Romantic and Victorian eras, and modern poetry (up until 1930).  Consideration of historical and cultural contexts.  Readings primarily poems, with some essays.  Three graded assignments (one exam, twice a choice of an exam or a four-page paper) and a cumulative final examination.
 
 
ENGL 2318.01:  World Literature, Classical
Lynn Enterline
TR 2:35
The course moves through several prominent, long-standing classical genres that continue to be felt in contemporary literary production – tragedy, lyric, epic, romance – with the aim of allowing students to recognize and interpret significant echoes of earlier cultures in their own cultural moment. Moving from ancient Greek and Roman through early modern Italian and English literary traditions, we read some of the most famous texts in the European canon, from Euripides’ Medea, Virgil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, to Shakespeare’s Othello. The texts are selected with an eye to tracing details of literary influence as each author carves a place as a poet using – and sometimes abusing – the literary past. Four sections organize the cultural and ideological concerns of the course as we move from ancient to renaissance literary production: empire and representations of the “civilized” and the “barbarous”; the close connection between theology and theories of language and rhetoric; poetry, sexuality, gender, and desire; humanism, early modern classicism, and social critique.
 
ENGL 2319W.01:  World Literature, Modern
Julia Fesmire
TR 1:10
“I don’t think writers are sacred, but words are.  They deserve respect.  If you get the right ones in the right order, you can nudge the world a little or make a poem which children will speak for you when you’re dead.”
 
The above quote from Tom Stoppard’s The Real Thing explains why I think the study of literature is important.  This course is an opportunity to become familiar with some of the most powerful texts of our literary tradition.  The texts I have chosen for this class will, I hope, provide an opportunity for us to learn something about how literature has developed and changed from the Renaissance through the present.  We will focus on concepts of heroism and courage, paying particular attention to the hero’s reaction to change, instability, adversity, and death.  How do these texts portray the task of the hero?  How does his quest affect relations between mortals and immortals?  Within the models offered by our texts, is it possible for women to be heroic?  How do fear and grief become avenues for challenging the social and order, and how do these emotions contribute towards the hero’s education?
 
Texts include the following:  Marlowe, Dr. Faustus; Molière, Don Juan; Pope, The Rape of the Lock; Byron, Don Juan; Pushkin, Eugene Onegin; Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac; Woolf, A Room of One’s Own; Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita; McEwan’s Atonement; Stoppard, Arcadia; Roy, The God of Small Things (Harper)
 
There will be lots of writing.
 
 
ENGL 2320.01:  Southern Literature: Making History, Reading Fiction
Colin Dayan
TR 1:10
What is the South? How do we understand what it means to be "Southern"? We will begin the semester with the provocative book by Grady McWhiney, Cracker Culture: Celtic Ways in the Old South.  Our next readings will be antebellum slave cases (1830-1858) and selected slave narratives.  This first section of the course will conclude with histories of the Civil War. Only then will we ask how writers of fiction grappled with questions of race and romance, gothic terror and amorous bondage, turning to Edgar Allan Poe and Beverly Tucker. For the remainder of the semester we will read twentieth- century and contemporary novelists such as Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Walker Percy, Cormac McCarthy, Jesmyn Ward, and Madison Smartt Bell.

Requirements: Class participation, two papers, and a presentation.
 
 
English 3215.01:  The Art of Blogging
Amanda Little  
W 3:10                                                                                                       
This course focuses on techniques and strategies for successful blogging. Today, just sixteen years after the first blog was published, there are nearly 200 million public blogs on the internet, some of which have larger audiences and more influence than the most esteemed print publications.
 
Blogs can empower anyone who has something to say, and the ability to say it in an interesting way, yet very few blogs are well-written and authoritative, or manage to reach a broad audience. In this course, we will track and analyze influential blogs in the categories of politics, business, and activism. We’ll look to the past, examine the roots of self-published manifestoes that date back the 17th century, and to the future, exploring multimedia blogging formats and the “micro-blogging” phenomena like Twitter.
 
At a time when virtually every public figure from Barack Obama to Lady Gaga have entered the blogosphere, students will come to understand how blogs are revolutionizing the media, powering politics, shaping culture, and changing the way we write. Students will create and regularly update their own blogs for this course. We will discuss your posts in class and I will critique your writing in private conferences.
 
 
English 3220.01:  Advanced Nonfiction Writing
Peter Guralnick  
T 3:10  
 
 
ENGL 3230.01:   Intermediate Fiction Workshop
Justin Quarry
W 3:10
This workshop is geared toward those who already have some experience writing short stories, with the intentions of broadening students’ knowledge of the elements of craft and strengthening their utilization of narrative techniques, and of incorporating elements of fantasy in literary fiction.  The chief texts for this course will be approximately thirty stories written by workshop members, but throughout the semester students also will read and examine craft essays and contemporary American short fiction in order to better understand how to apply what they learn to their own writing.  The final for the course will consist of a significant revision of one of two original stories produced during the semester. Previous creative writing workshop experience is strongly recommended before taking this class, and instructor permission is required to enroll. Sign up on the course's YES wait list, and you will receive application instructions for the course in early December.
 
ENGL 3230.02:   Intermediate Fiction Workshop
Staff
W 3:10
 
 
ENGL 3240.01:  Advanced Fiction Workshop
Marie L. Moore
W 12:10
 
ENGL 3240.02:   Advanced Fiction Workshop
Nancy Reisman  
M 12:10
This workshop is designed as a forum for experienced fiction writers to expand their visions, refine their aesthetics, and consider questions about fictional form and art-making. We’ll focus mainly on short story forms, revisit some essential matters of craft and technique, and consider significant questions about time, perception, and spatial relationships in stories, uses of defamiliarization, and the roles of silence, among other issues. I’ve designed the workshop with the goals of both fostering experimentation and enabling writers to further develop established strengths. The reading and writing for the course will be literary fiction generally based in realism (extending to surrealism, magical realism, meta-fiction). The core questions remain: What material, style, methods of storytelling interest you the most and how can you best access that material? What is the potential and what are the apparent boundaries of different fictional forms? The heart of this course is the workshop: the development and discussion of your creative work-in-progress. We’ll also read and discuss several published stories and essays on craft.
 
Experience in the English 3230/204 (Intermediate) workshop or equivalent strongly recommended.
 
Instructor permission required. Interested students should register for the wait list: at the end of the course selection period, I’ll contact all wait-listed writers with guidelines for writing samples.
 
 
ENGL 3260.01:   Advanced Poetry Workshop
Mark Jarman
M 2:10
This class is a poetry workshop.  Each week we will discuss poems you have written.  Also, the week you have a poem under discussion, you will prepare to talk about a poem in one of our texts.  This poem can be related in some way to your own or simply be an example of a kind of poem you would like to write.  This will give everybody a chance to read a good deal of contemporary poetry.  Good poets are good readers.  Writing and reading in this class will, I hope, be of equal interest.  Eight original poems, (four of which will be discussed in class), plus a revision of each poem; four oral reports.  The eight revisions, typed copies of the four oral reports, and responses to the visiting poets will be due as a final project or portfolio as the end of the semester.  The poems not discussed in class must be shown to me before the final project is due.
 
 
ENGL 3280.01:  Literature & Craft of Writing: Time, Space, Place and Memory in the Art of Fiction
Nancy Reisman
TR 11:00
In this course, we’ll explore varied ways in which select fiction writers conceptualize and represent time in their work, and ways in which readers experience fictional time, as well  as how writers conceptualize and represent fictional space.  How might individual or collective cultural experiences of time influence the elements and concerns of stories and novels?  How might a given writer convey experiences of landscape, city, enclosed/interior and other kinds of physical spaces?  What is ‘place’ within a story or novel de-emphasizing traditional geographies? How might retrospective and the experience of memory shape certain fictions and how might the process of memory be represented?  In this class, we’ll read a range of published fictional works, including flash fiction, short stories and novels, and investigate the ways in which different writers have approached these questions.  Writing for the course will include both analytical work and brief creative pieces. The course is designed with the interests of emerging fiction writers and potential writers in mind (fiction writing experience not required). 
 
 
ENGL 3310.01:  Anglo-Saxon Language and Literature
John Plummer
TR 1:10
We will study the Anglo-Saxon (Old English) language, culture, history, and of course literature: excerpts from chronicles, sermons, biblical paraphrases, and poetry, including selections from Beowulf.   Our textbook will be Bruce Mitchel’s An Invitation to Old English and Anglo-Saxon England, which also includes material on archaeology, place names, arts and crafts, and warfare.
 
 
ENGL 3316.01:   Medieval Literature
John Plummer
TR 9:35
This course introduces the student to the chief literary forms and cultural issues of the late 13th through the 15th centuries in England.  We learn Middle English while reading chronicles, saints lives, drama, romance, lyrics, and allegory, exploring the alterity and modernity of medieval culture, what we have in common with the period and how we differ from it. No previous experience with medieval studies is required or expected.  Graded work includes a midterm and final exam, a paper of 8-10 pages, and class participation.
 
 
ENGL 3335 .01:   English Renaissance Poetry
Jessie Hock
MWF 2:10
Poetry was the most prestigious and important literary form in the English Renaissance. This course will investigate that statement, inquiring into how poetry was practiced in the period stretching from 1557-1667, and how that practice has been theorized (both then and now). Students will read from a range of authors and poetic genres while inquiring into the role of the poet, and poetry, in Renaissance social and cultural life. How, we will ask, did poetry speak to a diverse range of issues, from politics to gender to commerce to science, and how have contemporary critics situated Renaissance poetry in contemporary cultural debates. In the process, students will become familiar with Renaissance literary and cultural history, and will also fine-tune their critical reading and writing skills.
 
Readings will cover a wide range of Renaissance poetry and poetic theory, including work by authors such as Wyatt, Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney, Wroth, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Lanyer, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, and others. Requirements include active class participation, short writing responses, and two essays.
 
 
ENGL 3340W.01:   Shakespeare: Representative Selections: Lyric Shakespeare
Jessie Hock
MWF 4:10
Although he is best known for his plays, Shakespeare also wrote poetry, producing a sonnet sequence and several longer poems. He also wrote poetry in his plays, where characters speak in blank verse, rhyming couplets, and even sonnets, in addition to prose. Furthermore, poetry is a frequent theme in the plays, from Romeo and Juliet speaking to each other in sonnets to Armando in Love’s Labour’s Lost “turning sonnet” as he falls in love. This course will examine Shakespearean drama and poetry in the context of Renaissance poetic traditions, particularly the sonnet craze that came to a head in the 1590s (just as Shakespeare was writing his first plays). As we read a representative selection of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, and histories, we will think about the ways they enact and represent poetic traditions. To do so, readings and class discussion will focus on critical approaches to Shakespeare, Renaissance literary culture, critical reading skills, the historical and performative context of the plays, and their long afterlives.
 
Readings will include a selection of Shakespeare’s sonnets and ten of his plays. Course requirements include regular class participation, short reading responses, and two papers.
 
 
ENGL 3346.01:  Seventeenth-Century Literature                                                      
Roger Moore
TR 9:35
This course is a broad introduction to the poetry and prose of the seventeenth century within its religious and historical contexts.  Writers will include John Donne, George Herbert, Robert Herrick, Andrew Marvell, Sir Thomas Browne, Robert Burton, and John Milton, as well as a host of lesser-known writers.  The seventeenth-century in England was an age of revolution and iconoclasm, and our thematic focus will be on the various types of “selves” and identities that emerged during the period.  Assignments will include two exams, a couple of short papers, and a research project. 
 
 
ENGL 3348.01:  Milton
Leah Marcus 
TR 4:00
 
 
ENGL 3370.01:  The Bible in Literature
Roy Gottfried
MWF 11:10
Echoes and long shadows of the Authorized Version of the Bible (King James Version) in English literature of the 17th through the twentieth centuries.  Works include: poetry of Donne, Herbert, Marvell and others; Milton’s epic Paradise Lost; Tennyson’s elegy In Memoriam;  and Eliot’s The Waste Land.  Some familiarity with the Bible is helpful, but not necessary. A midterm essay exam, a 15 page paper, and a final exam.
 
 
ENGL 3610.01:  The Romantic Period
Schoenfield, Mark        
TR 11:00                                                                                       
While glory seemed betrayed, while patriot zeal 
Sank in our hearts, we felt as men should feel 
With such vast hordes of hidden carnage near; 
And horror breathing from the silent ground.
 
So wrote Wordsworth, upon visiting the fields of Waterloo.  Associated with a shift from the imitative to the expressive mode of poetry, romantic literature reflects a time of revolution, when Britain feared enemy invasion, confronted its own dreadful engagement in the slave trade, faced famine and the massive disruptions of industrialization.  Its writers sought new literary genres and theoretical formulations of the mind to understand this turbulence.  In this class, we will explore poets, novelists, and journalists whose experiments in writing transformed aesthetic norms and social understandings.  Writers will include William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, and their daughter Mary Shelley; William and Dorothy Wordsworth; and others who explore their capacity for passion and horror.
 
 
ENGL 3642.01:  Film and Modernism
Sam Girgus
MW 2:35
Film originated with the modernist movement and grew to maturity with the great modernists of art, literature, and philosophy.  The course will study film from the perspective and within the context of the major themes of modernism: the religious impulse in a skeptical and secular time; the divided self; the break between language and realism; nihilism and the search for belief; narrative space and time in film; the body and film. Thus, the course will examine the relationship of film to the forces and movements that define and impel modernism, including changes regarding sexuality and gender, ethics, belief, identity, values, and lifestyles. Readings will include classics of literary modernism and the modern tradition. We will relate these readings to the cinema of modernism from a variety of national film traditions. The course will structure this learning and viewing experience in terms of the personal quest in modernity for belief and commitment.
 
 
ENGL 3644.01:  Twentieth Century American Novel
Hortense Spillers
MWF 11:10
 
 
ENGL 3711.01:  Literary and Intellectual History:  U.S. American Modernisms: The Roarin' Twenties      Vera M. Kutzinski                                                                                                      
TR 4:00
This seminar explores modernist literature from the 1920s, a decade of virtually unparalleled creativity in the USA. This decade also included the Harlem or New Negro Renaissance, one of the most important events in twentieth-century USAmerican intellectual and cultural history. Our focus will be on the intimate and vexed relations modernist literary writers and their characters have to various cultural others, however those others were defined. We will read fiction and poetry from this period, at times in relation to select samples of painting and photography, in order to understand and question the different ways in which writers either tackled or evaded pressing issues of cultural difference relative to gender, sexuality, race, and class, as they struggled to articulate a national identity and poetics. Readings include works by T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Gertrude Stein, and William Carlos Williams, among others. Requirements: Biweekly short papers (500-700 words); one longer final research project (minimum 3,000 words).
 
 
ENGL 3720.01:  Literature, Science, and Technology: The Poetics of Early Modern Curiosity
Pavneet Aulakh
MWF 1:10
Though C. P. Snow’s contention that the arts and sciences represent two distinct and opposed cultures with competing world-views has lost some of its currency, we often still continue to think of the sciences and arts in binary terms.  We tend to maintain, for example, that the former embody a world of solid facts, whereas the latter is governed by the creative imagination.  This course, however, will test this presumption by studying the works of early proponents of experimental philosophy, including those of Francis Bacon, Galileo, and Robert Hooke, alongside the poetry, drama, and novels of their seventeenth and early eighteenth-century peers. Supplementing our readings with recent scholarship that studies science from a sociological perspective, we will consider the curiosity that drives the pursuit of scientific knowledge and the poesis, or making, that underwrites it.  Moreover, in reading Christopher Marlowe, John Donne, Ben Jonson, John Milton, and Margaret Cavendish together with some of the writers that helped bring modern science into being, we will not only examine the complex ways in which imaginative literature responded to the ambitions of the “new science,” but also how the latter helped to redeem curiosity as an intellectual virtue common to both artists and scientists.
 
 
ENGL 3726.01:  New Media: The Space Between 1s and 0s: Telepresence Technology, Digital Media, and the Posthuman Vision
Haerin Shin    
TR 1:10                                                                                     
"Lulled into somnolence by five hundred years of print, literary analysis should awaken to the importance of media-specific analysis, a mode of critical attention which recognizes that all texts are instantiated and that the nature of the medium in which they are instantiated matters" -- N. Katherine Hayles
As breakthroughs in medial and computer science continuously expand the scope of our bodily and mental presence, the question concerning technology - the role it plays in defining our being and reality, its functional mechanism, and the effects such new methods of mediation exert upon our perception and cognition - presses us with an ever-growing urgency. How do we define and know who we are, and how does one certify his or her own existence in an age when mechanical augmentation, extension, or even replacement of the body is a realistic venture, and the properties of the human mind can be reproduced, preserved, and/or emulated in the form of digital code? If the human body and its operational constitution could be compatible with that of machines, and self-evolving machines could interact with or even replace humans in their intellectual capacity, what does being human and discerning the grounds of the reality we inhabit involve and mean? Do new mediatory means reconfigure the way in which we perceive, comprehend, and in turn build the world we live in? This course explores how new media represent, reflect on, and inspire ontological discourses by focusing on the structure and workings of digital and other types of telepresence technology. Students will examine how presence and its representation have transitioned from analog to digital, and organic to mechanic channels of mediation and instantiation. Course materials will include narratives constructed through print and digital platforms, such as short stories and novels delivered in book form or Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Kindle, Blogs, Youtube, and Vine; black and white, CGI-enhanced, and IMAX films; cell and digital animation, print and web comics, board and computer games, archives and disctionaries (from OED to Wikipedia and Google), etc. Titles and specific works to be covered will range from works by authors Philip K. Dick, Ted Chiang, Shelley Jackson, etc.; Films and TV productions by Pixar, Oshii Mamoru (Avalon), Alex Garland (Ex Machina), and Charlie Brooker (Black Mirror); critical/theoretical reflections by Renee Descartes, Walter Benjamin, Nick Bostrom, Katherine Hayles, Mark Hansen, Ian Bogost, Lydia Liu, etc. 
 
 
ENGL 3742.01:   Feminist Theory
Candice Amich
MWF 10:10                                                                                                  
An introduction to feminist theory, this course is designed to provide you with the basic skills necessary to use gender as a tool of cultural analysis. We will read theory from and about twentieth-century “second-wave” feminism, as well as explore more recent queer and transgender engagements with feminism. Rubrics of study include gender and difference, gender and media, and gender and globalization. In addition to theoretical texts, we will examine a variety of feminist media, including poetry, performance and film.
 
ENGL 3890 Movements in Literature:
 
ENGL 3890.01:  Movements in Literature: Revenge Tragedy
Kathryn Schwarz
TR 1:10
In 1605, Francis Bacon called revenge “a kind of wild justice”. Here are a few scenes that illustrate his point:
  • A man bursts into a banquet, with the heart of his lover impaled on his dagger.
  • A duke, already poisoned, dies while watching his wife seduce his son.
  • A ruler pauses in mid-conspiracy to announce that he is the most lecherous, traitorous, and corrupt man in the kingdom.
Renaissance revenge tragedies are extravagantly violent, explicitly sexual, and closely tied to political critique. They are also written and performed in a time of aggressive state-sponsored censorship, when “going public” in the wrong way would result in the loss of freedom, body parts, or life. What is the purpose of these plays, and how might we explain their wild popularity, their cultural impact, and the fact that they could appear onstage at all?
 
In this course we will consider the reoccupation with revenge in Renaissance drama. We will use the figure of the revenger to address a range of issues: the individual subject as an agent and a victim of violence; the close links between revenge and sexuality; the implications of revenge for the political state; the particular theatricality of revenge plots; and the connections between revenge and other kinds of ethical, erotic, or social transgression.
 
Readings: plays by John Ford, Thomas Heywood, Ben Johnson, Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Middleton, William Shakespeare, and John Webster.
 
Requirements: participation in class discussions; a group presentation; a short paper related to the presentation; and a final paper.
 
ENGL 3890.02:  Movements in Literature:  The New Negro Movement
Gabriel Briggs
MWF 12:10
This course examines the literary and cultural factors that influence the development of a modern African American identity by reconstructing the emergence of the “New Negro.” In the 1920s, the term New Negro entered general parlance to denote a modern form of African-American racial representation. The emergence of this African-American identity is distinctly different from the compliant, rural and under-educated African American who preceded the New Negro and, as well, from the negative racial stereotypes created by whites or drawn from the romantic racialism of white fiction writers. New Negroes self-identified as progressive, urban figures with cultural and intellectual sensibilities generally connected to the period between World War I and World War II. Our analysis will trace the evolution of New Negro thought from its political origins in the late nineteenth-century through its radicalization in the World War I era, and will conclude with its more conservative, cultural transformation during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Students will work toward developing strategies for positioning authors and texts within specific cultural, historical, and theoretical contexts, and should be willing to experiment with new ways of reading literary and cultural texts. Among the numerous selections we will read are works by Anna Julia Cooper, W. E. B. Du Bois, Fannie Barrier Williams, Booker T. Washington, Elise McDougald, Sutton Griggs, Nella Larsen, and Langston Hughes.
 
ENGL 3890W.01:  Movements in Literature:  Coming-of-Age During the Decline of the British Empire
Elizabeth Covington
TR 9:35
 
English 3891.01:  Special Topics in Creative Writing: The Art of Medical Writing
Kate Daniels
T 12:10
In this once-a-week creative writing workshop (enrollment limited to 12), students will explore the growing field of non-clinical medical writing by physicians, patients, and other healthcare and medical professionals - personal essays, non-fiction, poetry, and autobiography - as models for their own writing, and as a way of entering more deeply into their understanding of medical education, healthcare experience, and being ill.
Particular attention will be paid to practice in integrating medical content; managing alternating point-of-view; consideration of audience appeal in creative works combining creative writing and non-fiction medical based content; narrative voice and confidentiality; and other topics as they arise from the reading and the writing undertaken by students. Pre-medical students and MHS majors / minors with interest in writing are particularly welcome. Interested students need to e-mail the instructor ASAP at kate.daniels@vanderbilt.edu.
The reading list includes:
*  On being Ill, Virginia Woolf (essay)
*  People Like That Are the Only People Here, Lorrie Moore (short story)
*  The Autobiography of a Face, Lucy Grealy
*  Men We Reaped, Jesamyn Ward
*  Willow, Weep for Me: A Black Woman's Journey Through Depression, Meri Nana-Ama Danquah
*  Body of Work: Meditations on Mortality from the Human Anatomy Lab, Christine Montross, M.D.
*  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Rebecca Skloot
*  Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor's Reflection on Race & Medicine, Damon Tweedy
*  The Desire to Heal: A Doctor's Education in Empathy, Identity, and Poetry, Rafael Campo, M.D.
*  Portfolio of Poetry selected by Kate Daniels
Requirements:
*  20 pages of original text, revised over the course of the semester. Students will select the genres in which they will respond to an assignment, and can stick with one, or write several.
*  Class attendance and participation.
*  Attendance at selected events in MHS spring conference, The Politics of Health in the American South. [http://www.vanderbilt.edu/mhs/the-politics-of-health-in-the-u-s-south/]
*  Written responses to student work presented to workshop.
*  Two personal conferences with the instructor. 
*  Final portfolio of the semester's work, revised. 
Grading:  60% written work and 40% class participation in class, at readings, and at conferences with the instructor.
 
 
English 3892.02: Problems in Literature: The Black Literary Divide: Black Men and Black Women Representing One Another
Houston Baker
TR 11:00
From the gendered dynamics of the Transatlantic Slave Trade to the creative and occupational roles of African American men and women in the present century, there have been notable - sometimes fractious - distinctions of roles and representations.  On board transatlantic slave ships African men and African women occupied separate spaces, distinctive characterizations, and differential usage. On plantations of the New World, women and men slaves sometimes performed the same soul-killing labor in the fields, but the prospects of mobility and escape from bondage were not equal. Women slaves were more subject to rigorous surveillance (and certain forms of abuse) more often than their male counterparts. Slave women could add to the Masters' store in two forms of "property": they harvested agricultural goods and bore children destined by law to follow the slave status of their mothers. Through reading and discussion of a series of paired texts the present course seeks to analyze the "great divide" between world views, creative styles, and representational strategies of African American men's and women's writings.
 
Tentative pairings will include: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olauda Equiano and The History of Mary PrinceNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and Incidents in the Life of Slave GirlDust Tracks on a Road and Black BoyZami and The Autobiography of Malcolm XThe Color Purple and Reckless Eyeballing. Secondary readings will include essays, poems, and short dramatic works by authors such as Bell Hooks, Amiri Baraka, Angela Davis, Natasha Tretheway, and others.  Classic debate motivated by differential status, placement, and forms of address to the world by African American men and women will be points of focus.
 
ENGL 3894 Major Figures in Literature:
 
ENGL 3894.01:  Major Figures in Literature: William Faulkner
Vereen Bell
MW 1:10
 
ENGL 3894.02:  Major Figures in Literature:  Edith Wharton, Jack London
Cecelia Tichi
TR 2:35
 
ENGL 3894.03:  Major Figures in Literature: James Joyce: Ulysses
Mark Wollaeger
TR 11:00                                                                                                   
What is the value of James Joyce’s Ulysses today? If you Google “best novel ever,” the first result produces a list with Ulysses at the top (Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man comes in third). But of course if you Google “best song ever” you get something by One Direction, so who’s to say? When first published in 1922, Ulysses hit the international literary scene like a thunderbolt. Arnold Bennett, best-selling English author and famous punching bag for Virginia Woolf, believed that Joyce had “shattered all the codes.” Woolf too was ambivalent, finding the book had “genius” but nevertheless was a “mis-fire.” Even those who unequivocally despised Ulysses, such as his contemporary provocateur Wyndham Lewis (“a monument like a record diarrhoea”), acknowledged its power. In this course, we will not assume that Ulysses still rumbles in the same way. Instead, we’ll aim to arrive at our own estimation of the kinds of value that this sort of thing may have today, for you. By extension, we’ll be asking about the value of reading literature today. What kind of pleasure might be specific to this order of literary complexity? What use might Ulysses have in our hypertextual, information-saturated age? Need it have any?
 
This course will focus on structured collaboration: beyond class discussion, you will engage in the production of group and individual wiki projects, and you will write at least one essay. No midterm or final exam.
 
ENGL 3894.04:  Major Figures in Literature: Oscar Wilde and the 1890’s
Rachel Teuklosky
TR 2:35                                                                                                    
“I was a man who stood in symbolic relations to the art and culture of my age.” So wrote Oscar Wilde in 1897, from the confinement of a prison cell. Wilde’s career offers a revealing glimpse into late-Victorian culture and society—from his roots in Ireland, to his ascent in London society as a celebrated wit and playwright, to his stunning arrest and imprisonment for “acts of gross indecency” with other men. This course will examine Wilde’s writings within the context of the last decade of the nineteenth century, when anxieties about the fate of British culture and empire spurred a kind of conservative hysteria, along with the subversive counter-culture known as “decadence.” Texts will include Wilde’s poetry, essays on art, aesthetics, and socialism, his plays The Importance of Being Earnest and Lady Windermere’s Fan,and his gothic novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. We will also consider his decadent play Salomé, banned by London censors and published in book form with illustrations by Aubrey Beardsley. Other authors and artists will help us to understand the rebellious art-culture of the 1890s: Walter Pater, R. L. Stevenson, J.-K. Huysmans, Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Symons, J. M. Whistler, D. G. Rossetti, Max Beerbohm, George Egerton, and Michael Field, among others.
 
ENGL 3894.05:  Major Figures in Literature:  Political Austen
Scott J. Juengel
MWF 11:10
The Marxist critic Raymond Williams famously wrote of Jane Austen: “It is a truth universally acknowledged that Jane Austen chose to ignore the decisive historical events of her time.  Where, it is still asked, are the Napoleonic wars: the real current of history?”  Such a characterization reinforced the Austen family’s carefully managed, posthumous image of “Aunt Jane,” the parochial spinster whose life was said to be untouched by politics, passions, immodesty, or eventfulness.  And yet, the period we might call the “Age of Austen” (1775-1817) was a period of revolutionary and liberation movements in Europe, America and the Caribbean, unremitting wartime and popular violence, profound challenges to the class structure, and the new expressions of feminine solidarity and public dissent.  This course investigates the possibilities of a “political” Jane Austen (as well as the politics of “Jane Austen,” an invention of the nineteenth century).  As such, it is a course about literary and cultural politics, the history of bourgeois domesticity, and emergent feminist thought.  The seminar will begin with an exploration on Mary Wollstonecraft’s pioneering Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792) and Austen’s juvenilia and early fictions, before turning to the late novels such as Mansfield ParkEmma and Persuasion.
 
ENGL 3898  Special Topics in English and American Literature:
 
ENGL 3898.01:  Special Topics in English and American Literature:  20th Century Performance
Candice Amich
MWF 12:10                                                                                                  
Performance is a contested term and interdisciplinary field of study that reimagines the relationship between bodies and histories. As a conceptual lens, performance takes as its object of study everything from avant-garde experimentation in the arts to consumptive practices at heritage sites, theatrical role-playing to daily self-fashioning, digital mediation to embodied knowing. Reading deeply in performance/performativity theory, we will explore questions of media, identity and audience across multiple genres and modes, including drama, poetry, film and the visual arts.
 
ENGL 3898.02:  Special Topics in English and American Literature: The Book in the Renaissance Imagination 
Pavneet Aulakh
MWF 2:10
With books grown so familiar and increasingly marginalized by new reading mediums, it is helpful to recall Francis Bacon’s identification of the printing press, along with gunpowder and the compass, among the three greatest inventions of the Renaissance. Bacon’s observation invites us to reconsider the function of the book, and particularly print, as a technology that enabled unique kinds of reading and use. To that end, this course, first and foremost, will enrich our awareness of the history of the book, of the uses and reading practices to which it gave rise. What advantages did it offer in lieu of older reading technologies? How, for example, could a book be salvific — as it was for Augustine and Herbert — or even dangerous— as with Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus? How did print technology contribute to the rise and establishment of modern science? Moreover, as a technology that, like its modern counterparts (the internet, smart phones and tablets), produced the experience of information overload, what new means and supplemental technologies did it inspire for managing information and confirming its veracity? Finally, and on a broader level, this course will use the prominence Bacon accords the printed book to explore how the book figured in the early modern imagination. Through our readings of early modern authors like John Donne, George Herbert, Francis Bacon, Christopher Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, and Shakespeare, we will examine the new modes of thinking and, possibly even anxieties, the book and technologies of writing elicited as well as the possibilities of authority they afforded authors.
 
ENGL 3898.03:  Special Topics in English and American Literature: The Creative, the Critical, and the Literary: A Dialect of Spectrality: Reading and Writing Ghost Stories
Tony Earley, Haerin Shin        
TR 2:35                                                                                    
Ghost stories have always been a haunting presence in the realm of literary imagination—bump in the night, monsters in the closet, and shadowy figures lurking in the attic. Immaterial yet persisting portions of our personalities, desires, memories and dreams acquire lives of their own as they straddle the here and yonder at the threshold of no return. Their voices sending shivers down our spines, we cuddle around the campfire, and even with our hands growing damp with sweat and our eyes fluttering in a desperate attempt to ward off the impending doom, there’s no turning back. The story must go on, we want more, we must hear out the tale to its grisly end. Whether it be the adrenalin-pumping mechanism of mounting dread, the pulsating anticipation of terror, or the repulsive yet irresistible draw to visceral horror, ghost stories fascinate us with an enduring appeal. What constitutes this enchanting force of ghostly matters, and why do they return from the dead? What is it that they so urgently wish to tell us, and why do those stories matter in our world of the living, here and now? Transparent, humanoid, beastly, sorrowful, playful, or at times even purely conceptual as metaphors of the mind and soul, the spectrum of entities we call “ghosts” demand to be heard. Our class responds to this call by inviting those who wish to not only unpack, but also contribute to the rich body of literature that depicts the enigma of such phantasms by combining creative writing with literary and critical readings. Class members will explore tales of the ghostly across a wide range of media including short stories, TV show episodes, animation, and the graphic narrative; expand on such readings by pairing them with critical writings that analyze key elements of the genre such as fear, reason, consciousness, and the workings of telepresence technology; and write ghost stories of their very own, which will be shared among peers for comments and discussion. The class will alternate between literary/critical readings and creative writing workshops on a three-week cycle, providing its members with an opportunity to transform the representative and reflective power of literature into a source of creative inspiration.
 
 
ENGL 3899.01:  Special Topics in Film: Jews, Hollywood, and the American Idea
Sam Girgus
T 3:10
For more than a century, Jewish writers, thinkers, and public figures saw a profound cohesion between the Jewish experience and what historians have called the American Idea of the American Way. A transformative story of the Jews revived the hope for a promise of America. Over many generations, Jews in film, Hollywood, and entertainment imagined and invented a new world in popular culture that enacted and realized this new story of Jews and America. The course will relate film and Hollywood to the literature, rhetoric, and history of the story of Jews and the American idea. We will study the art and influence of Jews in film and Hollywood from the early days of the Hollywood “moguls” and stars like Al Jolson and Eddie Cantor to contemporary figures such as Woody Allen, Kirk Douglas, Mel Brooks, Nora Ephron, Elaine May, Stanley Kubrick, and Stephen Spielberg, among others. We will examine the significance of relatively neglected figures of previous prominence and genius such as Paul Muni, Edward G. Robinson, Lauren Bacall, ad John Garfield. The Hollywood enactment of the story will be placed in the context of the work and thought of such figures as Mary Antin, AnziaYezierska, Henry Roth, Abraham Cahan, Louis Brandeis, Norman Mailer, Saul Bellow, E.L. Doctorow, Philip Roth, Ellen Willis, Irving Howe, Norman Podhoretz, among others. At the end, we will consider how it all began to change in the 1960’s.
 
 
ENGL 4960. Senior Year Capstone
Michael Kreyling
“Our age is retrospective”. That’s the first line of Emerson’s Nature (1836). He should be alive today. What would he make of our habit of revisiting, recasting, and reframing stories that gave already been told? I’m proposing a capstone class in which English Majors will do that: read pairs of texts and investigate, from our various academic histories, the “who-what-when-where-why” of literary revisits and recyclings. Our critical and theoretical frameworks will include national and postcolonial approaches, gender studies, and historical co ntext. The provisional syllabus will include:
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter
  • John Updike, S.
  • Herman Melville, Typee
  • Albert Wendt, Leaves of the Banyan Tree
  • Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman
  • Albert Camus, The Stranger (in English)
  • Kamel Daoud, The Mersault Investigation
  • Richard Wright, Native Son
  • Aravind Adiga, The White Tiger
 

 
Courses taught in other departments and programs that will count toward English Majors and Minors:
 
ASIA 2100W Coming of Age in Asia 
Ben Tran                                                                                                            
In the European Bildungsroman (or coming-of-age novel), young protagonists come-of-age, learning the ways of the world psychologically, socially, and morally. Youth in this genre represents a struggle between self-determination and the process of socialization, symbolizing modern society's potential for mobility as well as its uncertainties. This course will examine how the Bildungsroman takes on different meanings in Asian Literature. will will read coming-of-age works that address and represent the politics of gender, nationalism, and language within the frameworks of modernity and colonialism. This class will look at the experiences of young men and women in different socio-historical contexts that range from Indochina to Japan.
 
AMER 4100 History, Memory, and National Identity
Teresa Goddu                                                                                                            TR 2:35 PM - 3:50 PM
This course examines the representation of historical trauma through literature, film, and the built environment. It explores how specific historical events are remembered – both resurrected and re-contained – through different cultural forms. We will locate ourselves in historical sites that are crucial to the production of U.S. national identity: slavery, the Holocaust, 9/11, as well as the contemporary moment of climate change. In doing so, we will examine how cultural texts represent and reconstruct a traumatic past (or, in the case of climate change, an imagined future) in dialogue with the present needs of national identity. Our focus will be on the production of public memory and its central role in the formation of national identity.
 
CMA 3892  Cinema in the Dark Times: the Twentieth Century of Billy Wilder and Roman Polanski
Scott J. Juengel
This course focuses on two influential filmmakers whose lives and cinematic visions were shaped by the horrors of the mid-twentieth century: Billy Wilder and Roman Polanski. Born a generation apart, both filmmakers fled Nazi-occupied Europe to live in exile, both lost their mothers and other family members in the concentration camps, both would subsequently make Holocaust films (Wilder's Death Mills; Polanski's The Pianist), classic noirs, (Double IndemnityChinatown), "apartment films", (The ApartmentRepulsion and Rosemary's Baby); ghost-writer films (Sunset BoulevardThe Ghost Writer); cross-dressing films (Some Like It HotThe Tenant); taut thrillers (Witness for the Prosecution; Knife in the Water and Frantic); and both would master a distinctly post-war form of black humor that taught us to laugh nervously  at historical contingency, procedural violence, and world-weariness. Polanki remains a complex figure of tragedy and outrage to this day, his reputation torqued by the murder of his wife and unborn child by the Charles Manson "family" in 1969 and his own infamy as a sexual predator. While Wilder and Polanski are rarely paired together, this semester's guiding proposition is that their incredible filmography can teach us something about history and cinema in the shadow of trauma and catastrophe. Among the many topics to be covered will be meditations on risk and systematicity ; the mainstreaming of absurdity; neighborliness and tenancy; the surreality of the entertainment and culture industry; art in exile; and the politics of the sexual revolution.
 
JS 2240  Black-Jewish Relations in Post-War American Literature and Culture
Adam Meyer
While discussions of the historical relationships between African Americans and Jewish Americans are not uncommon in the scholarly and popular discourse, examinations of the ways in which these relationships have been presented in American literature and culture are relatively rare. This course is an attempt to rectify such imbalance. Although we will certainly examine the historical record as a backdrop to our discussions, our focus will be on depictions of Black - Jewish relations in literature (novels and short stories) and films by African American and Jewish American artists. Such artistic productions provide a more personal view of the situation; rather than looking at large scale movements or at the interactions of national organizations, exploring such works allows us to see how the relationships actually play out - sometimes positively, sometimes negatively - in real world situations where individuals from the two backgrounds find themselves working with, or at odds with, each other. Doing so thus provides us with a different vantage point on the issue that may, in fact, affect the way we view the historical record itself.
 
JS 2250  Witnesses Who Were Not There: Literature of the Children of Holocaust Survivors
Adam Meyer
While a relatively large amount of material has been written about and by those who survived the German concentration camps during World War II, both non-fiction and fiction, significantly less has been written about and by the children of these Holocaust survivors. Beginning in the late 1970's and early 1980's, these "second generation" children began to raise their voices and to discuss the effect that the Holocaust has has on their lives, even though they had not actually been present in the camps. These effects are varies in degree and in kind from one person to the next, and this course is designed to look at these various responses, as seen in both memoirs and fictional productions of writers who are children of survivors, in an attempt to understand the rationales and motivations behind these diverse reactions. At the end of the course we will also briefly consider two related situations: those of the children of Holocaust perpetrators and those of the grandchildren of the survivors.
 
 
JS 2260  Coming of Age in Jewish Literature and Film
Allison Schachter
This course examines coming-of-age novels, stories, memoirs, and films from multiple Jewish cultural perspectives. What does it mean to grow up in the Russian empire in the late nineteenth century? In the French colonial Tunisia in the 1930’s? In the 1950’s American suburbia? What are the different challenges that young men and women face as they embrace or reject the Jewish lives their parents lived? How did they relate to their burgeoning sexuality? We will address a range of topics in the course including minority identity, the Holocaust and Zionism, sexuality and gender, and inter-ethnic and inter-faith relationships.
 
 
   
   

ENGL 3891.01:  Special Topics in Creative Writing:  The Art of Medical Writing

Kate Daniels                                                                                                            

In this once a week creative writing workshop (enrollment limited to 12), students will explore the growing field of non-clinical medical writing by physicians, patients, and other healthcare and medical professionals – personal essays, non-fiction, poetry, and autobiography – as models for their own writing, and as a way of entering more deeply into their understanding of medical education, healthcare experience, and being ill. 

 

Particular attention will be paid to practice in integrating medical content; managing alternating points of view; consideration of audience appeal in creating works combining creative writing and non-fiction medical-based content; narrative voice and confidentiality; and other topics as they arise from the reading and the writing undertaken by students.  Pre-medical students and MHS majors/minors with interest in writing particularly welcome.  Interested students need to email the instructor ASAP: kate.daniels@vanderbilt.edu.

 

Reading list includes:

·         On Being Ill , Virginia Woolf (essay)

·         “People Like That Are the Only People Here,”  Lorrie Moore (short story)

·         The Autobiography of a Face , Lucy Grealy

·         Men We Reaped , Jesamyn Ward

·         Willow, Weep for Me: A Black Woman’s Journey through Depression , Meri Nana-Ama Danquah

·         Body of Work: Meditations on Mortality from the Human Anatomy Lab,  Christine Montross, M.D.

·         The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks , Rebecca Skloot

·         Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflection on Race & Medicine , Damon Tweedy 

·         The Desire to Heal: A Doctor’s Education in Empathy, Identity , and Poetry, Rafael Campo, M.D.

·         Portfolio of poetry selected by KD

Requirements:

·         20 pages of original text, revised over the course of the semester.  Students will select the genres in which they respond to an assignment, and can stick with one, or write in several

·         Class attendance & participation

·         Attendance at selected events in MHS spring conference, The Politics of Health in the American South.  (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/mhs/the-politics-of-health-in-the-u-s-south/)

·         Written responses to student work presented to workshop

·         2 personal conferences with instructor

·         Final portfolio of semester’s work, revised

Grading:

60% written work and 40% participation in class, at readings, and at conferences with instructor.

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