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Fall 2017 Course Descriptions

Dear Students,


Please verify course selections in YES to see the complete selection of course dates and times. You will need to meet with your adviser in person before your registration appointment window, at which time, your adviser will release an electronic academic hold on your account so that you may register. E-mail your adviser for an appointment. The name of your adviser, as well as the time of your registration appointment window is listed on your YES landing page.

Admittance to Honors sections and 3000-level writing workshops are subject to instructor approval. Please refer to the individual course listings for instructions.

The descriptions that appear below are Fall 2017 are grouped chronologically by course number. If you do not find your section number, it likely means that the instructor has not yet provided a course description. The webmaster will continue to make every effort to update this page, so check back often.

please click here for a list of courses that satisfy the (History, Diverse Perspectives, Approach, Program II Creative Writing) requirements for English Majors and Minors.

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1100.01 - Composition:  A Secret History of the Essay
Jesse Montgomery
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM

To write an essay is to make an attempt. In school, we typically use the word “essay” to refer to a thing: a piece of writing on a given subject that you have to write in order to pass a class. Used as a verb, to essay means to give something a shot, to make an effort. We’ll examine different types of essays – from reviews and blogs to opeds and creative nonfiction – to help us understand our own writing practice better. to our own writing practice. Become better writers and essayists by practicing the fundamentals of rhetoric and composition, participating in workshops, and taking up a range of writing assignments and experiments.

1100.02 - Composition: Where I End and You Begin: Owning Your Arguments
Lauren Mitchell
MWF, 12:10 - 1:00 PM
We laughed when the term "Alternative Facts" was catapulted into the public eye, but whether we like it or not, Kellyanne Conway may be on to something. We'll explore a range of nonfiction writing to consider how language mediates facts and opinions, often blurring the line between the two. We'll also use these texts to help us understand better strategies for constructing well-structured prose. Students are (very) welcome to incorporate interdisciplinary topics into the four required essays.

1100.04 - Composition: Oh, the Things you can Write!
Rachel Gould
MWF, 2:10 - 3:00 PM
Academic writing can seem daunting, but the best writing takes risks and explores new ideas. You'll build on that premise as you explore how writing helps to develop analytical thinking. We'll devote class time to work-shopping writing at various stages, and examining genres ranging from brief personal bios to academic arguments and a multimodal project. You'll end the semester by submitting a portfolio that displays all of your work and explains what strategies have and haven't worked for you. After all, becoming a better writer is a never-ending process.

1100.05 - Composition
staff
MWF, 3:10 - 4:00 PM

1111.01 - First-Year Writing Seminar: Women's Autobiographical Writing
Kate Daniels
MW, 8:10 - 9:25 AM

In this course, we will explore the construction of female identity as it is represented in narrative, poetic, and theoretical texts by and about women. These texts show girls and women sometimes unconsciously accepting, but at other times questioning or even resisting conventional expectations of them as daughters, lovers, wives, or mothers. In realistic narratives and poems we see them absorbing the images of women as depicted in popular culture, including romance, fairy tales, and myth. Psychoanalytic theory describes how some women develop a culturally determined, gendered personality by internalizing early familial and social relationships. These are dramatized in case studies, novels, and short stories. As they reach adulthood, women in these texts try out protective roles in the world of work and writing. Readings will be chosen from such genres as the novel of development (Jane Eyre, The Awakening), autobiography (Woman Warrior), the historical novel (Beloved), case studies, essays, and poetry.

1111.08 - First-Year Writing Seminar: The Simple Art of Murder: Knowledge and Guilt in Detective Literature
Scott Juengel
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

An examination of classic works of detective fiction with a view toward exploring the ways in which knowledge and guilt interact in criminal activity and investigation. Authors to be considered include Sophocles, Shakespeare, Poe, Doyle, Christie, Chandler, Highsmith, Himes, Bugliosi, and Harris. Again and again we will encounter the difficulty of separating the art of murder from the performance of murder; again and again we will see that the art of murder is never really simple.

1111.10 - First-Year Writing Seminar: Shakespeare's Legacy
Kathryn Schwarz
MWF, 2:10 - 3:00 PM

Shakespeare died in 1616, but was not hailed as the supreme exemplar of English poetic genius for over a century. This course will examine the processes through which Shakespeare became an icon of literary accomplishment, drawing on the fascinating responses to his works. We will read several of Shakespeare's plays and poems, study commentary across centuries, examine adaptations including novels and films, and trace Shakespearean citations in a range of cultural contexts. We will neither applaud nor question Shakespeare's poetic genius, but rather appreciate its evolution as a phenomenon.

1111.36 - First-Year Writing Seminar: Foundational Stories of the Western Tradition
Roy Gottfried
MWF, 8:10 - 9:00 AM

This course examines a variety of narratives that have formed the basis of Western literature and culture. Readings include the Old Testament, Acts of the Apostles, Greek tragedy, Aesop, Ovid, Medieval Arthurian romances, The Arabian Nights, and Grimm's fairy tales.

1111.38 - First-Year Writing Seminar: Representations of War
Vereen Bell
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM

Representations of War Novels, memoirs, films, poems, and historical writings will provide examples of representations of war beginning with World War I and ending with the war in Afghanistan. Historical events and their representations always contain conflicting truths. The process of identifying and reconciling these truths will be the main focus of this course.

1111.52 - First-Year Writing Seminar: Shakespeare: Madmen, Lovers and Poets
Leah Marcus
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM
This course takes its title from King Theseus's disparaging statement in Midsummer Night's Dream: "The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, are of imagination all compact." King Theseus meant his statement to disparage all three groups, but there is strong evidence that Shakespeare disagreed with his dim view of them. Many of Shakespeare's plays hinge on madness and/or love, and all are full of poetry. We will study four plays from Shakespeare canon in order to explore his views of madness and melancholy, love, and creativity. Works to be included include Hamlet, Macbeth, Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It... We will use film versions of the plays as part of our discussions, and students will be encouraged (but not required) to participate in class performances, depending on student interest.

1210W.01 - Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Monsters in Fiction
Justin Quarry
TR, 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
In this course, we will explore various monsters—both realistic and fantastic—in fiction ranging from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries and analyze the elements of fiction used to illuminate them and in turn the societal anxieties and desires in the midst of which they appear. Over our months together, we will attempt to define, and redefine, what, or who, exactly a “monster” is and what makes such a creature simultaneously horrifying and fascinating, and we will examine novels, graphic novels, and short stories in order to determine the terms by which so-called monsters are understood and described, and what beyond the norm these creatures represent, both literally and metaphorically, in each encounter.
Moreover, the aim of this course is to teach you to think critically about literature, and so we also will devote a significant amount of time to focusing on the writing process by way of close reading, discussion, and writing assignments. Throughout the semester, you will practice analyzing and critiquing our selected literary works in three essays as well as several reading responses and in-class writing assignments, each intended to help you more clearly and more persuasively present your arguments by basing them on textual evidence.

1210W.02 - Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Monsters in Fiction
Justin Quarry
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM
In this course, we will explore various monsters—both realistic and fantastic—in fiction ranging from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries and analyze the elements of fiction used to illuminate them and in turn the societal anxieties and desires in the midst of which they appear. Over our months together, we will attempt to define, and redefine, what, or who, exactly a “monster” is and what makes such a creature simultaneously horrifying and fascinating, and we will examine novels, graphic novels, and short stories in order to determine the terms by which so-called monsters are understood and described, and what beyond the norm these creatures represent, both literally and metaphorically, in each encounter.
Moreover, the aim of this course is to teach you to think critically about literature, and so we also will devote a significant amount of time to focusing on the writing process by way of close reading, discussion, and writing assignments. Throughout the semester, you will practice analyzing and critiquing our selected literary works in three essays as well as several reading responses and in-class writing assignments, each intended to help you more clearly and more persuasively present your arguments by basing them on textual evidence.

1210W.03 - Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: "New Woman" Feminist Fiction
Sari Carter
MWF, 8:10 - 9:00 AM
What does it mean to call something "new"? What about calling a woman new? Sharpen your critical thinking and writing skills by analyzing feminist fiction from the "New Woman" movement. We'll explore novels by writers such as Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Virginia Woolf, whose daring artist expression argue for liberation. Three argumentative essays and revisions, with informal reading responses and a final presentation, aim to develop your ability to effectively use academic writing conventions to engage with the forms and techniques of fiction.

1210W.04 - Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Rethinking Women's Writing
Alex Oxner
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM
In the wake of the gender-charged rhetoric of the recent presidential election, it's critical for us to consider women writers. How do they reimagine gender and sexuality in their texts? We'll examine popular media and works by writers such as Virginia Woolf, Edith Wharton, and Alice Walker to consider who gender and genre play out in a range of forms, from realism and ghost stories to detective fiction and others. You'll write two "mini" essays and two formal essays that incorporate creative writing, close reading, and other writing conventions that can be adapted to writing in your own major.

1210W.05 - Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Crime and Punishment
Thea Autry
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM
What does it mean for the punishment to fit the crime? Develop your critical reading and writing skills by engaging with prose selections that force ethical questions about the nature of crime and the line between justice and punishment. Grading is based on four formal papers in multiple genres, paper revisions, a presentation, and regular informal writing, all designed to prepare you for conversing across a broad range of ideas and disciplines.

1210W.06 - Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques
staff
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

1210W.08 - Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques: Robots in the Literary Imagination
Kira Braham
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM

What could robots do for us? What could they do to us? In an attempt to answer these questions, writers such as Isaac Asimov, Phillip K. Dick, and Marge Piercy have imagined a variety of roles for humanoid artificial life. You will employ academic and creative writing to explore and analyze the way in which each of these roles—worker, solider, rebel, lover, tyrant—represents the hopes and fears associated with creating life in our own image. We will focus on writing as a process, working together to develop thoughtful writing practices.

1220W.01 - Drama: Forms and Techniques
Bridget Orr
TR, 1:10 - 2:25

This course explores the drama over two millennia, in many forms and genres. We focus primarily but by no means exclusively on the Western tradition, beginning with Greek tragedy and comedy (Medea and Lysistrata), then moving forward to a classic Chinese tragedy, Snow in Midsummer. Our readings in early modern English drama (Hamlet and Twelfth Night) will be followed by naturalistic drama by Ibsen, social satire by Oscar Wilde, and modernist plays by Pirandello, Brecht, and Beckett. The final section of the course will focus on recent plays by Caryl Churchill, Wole Soyinka, and David Hwang. We will explore changes and variations in such familiar categories as genre, characterization, setting, and plot and we will look at film versions of the plays to think about how the performative nature of drama shapes its textual construction.

1220W.02 - Drama: Forms and Techniques
Judy Klass
TR, 4:00 - 5:15 PM

1220W.03 - Drama: Forms and Techniques
staff
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM

1230W.02 - Literature and Analytical Thinking: Literature and the City
Lucy Kim
MWF, 8:10 - 9:00 AM
How do cities shape us? Develop your critical writing and analytical thinking skills by reading canonical works across multiple genres that coalesce around the common element of urban environment and experience. These formal essays (with at least one mandatory revision for each assignment) will comprise the majority of your grade. You'll end the semester with improved skills of literary analysis as well as clear and effective writing using academic writing conventions.

1230W.03 - Literature and Analytical Thinking: Hacking the Color Line: Black Cultural and Political Improvisations
Terrell Taylor
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM
How have black artists and thinkers altered the codes of white supremacy and anti-blackness in the pursuit of freedom? We'll explore the innovations and improvisations in African-American literary and cultural works, reading such authors as W.E.B. Du Bois, Frederick Douglass, and Ta-Nehisi Coates, to better understand how texts interact with their audiences. You'll write and revise three essays that progress from analysis, to comparison, and finally evaluation.

1230W.04 - Literature and Analytical Thinking: Fame in Fiction
Marianne Zumberge
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM
We'll compare the presentation of fame and celebrity across different forms of narrative. Examining the function of fame in such texts as Sunset Boulevard, The Life of Pablo, and Cat's Cradle, together we'll unpack the cultural symptoms of public exposure. With an eye toward our current socio-political landscape, we'll distinguish between the concepts of fame, infamy and notoriety. Be prepared to connect hypotheses developed in class with your observations of popular culture and mass media. You'll compose both formal and informal writing assignments that will expand your analytical, reflective, and creative writing toolkit.

1230W.05 - Literature and Analytical Thinking: Love and Marriage
Thomas (TJ) Cienki
MWF, 8:10 - 9:00 AM
Why do we love love? Learn and hone your critical writing and argumentation skills as we explore stories, plays, novels, and rom-coms that end happily ever after or otherwise devolve into marital malaise. Representative works include: William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Anne Fletcher's 27 Dresses (film), and short stories by Alice Munro, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Nell Freudenberger. End the semester with an outstanding portfolio that includes two analytical essays and one final creative adaptation based on the traditional marriage plot or one of its variants.

1230W.06 - Literature and Analytical Thinking
staff
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM

1230W.07 - Literature and Analytical Thinking
staff
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

1230W.08 - Literature and Analytical Thinking: Black Feminist Ideas Across Time and Space
Danielle Procope
MWF, 8:10 - 9:00 AM
How has black women's writing impacted society? How do questions of nationality, class, gender, race, and sexuality factor into the perspectives of black women writers? We'll explore black women's writing to develop our critical reading and formal writing skills, analyzing black feminist fiction, speeches, Op-Eds, poetry, and film. Texts will include works by Gloria Naylor, Audre Lorde, Janet Mock, and even Beyoncé’s Lemonade. You'll produce two revised critical essays and one creative essay. Get ready to improve your college-level writing while also becoming more familiar with black women's literary thought.

1230W.09 - Literature and Analytical Thinking: Comedy as Multimodal Pedagogy
Mariann VanDevere
TR, 9:35 - 10:50 AM
How can comedy be used as both (in)formal educational tool? In this project based course, we'll apply theories of humor, laughter, and pedagogy to stand-up routines to explore how jokes and sketches educate audiences on complex subjects such as the intersectionality among race, class, gender, and sexuality. In addition to participating in discussion, you'll produce three formal essays, and most importantly a collaborative multimodal final project.

1230W.10 - Literature and Analytical Thinking
staff
TR, 8:10 - 9:25 AM

1240.01 - Beginning Nonfiction Workshop: The Art of the Personal Essay
Piyali Bhattacharya
T, 12:10 - 3:00 PM

In the age of the online essay, what is it that makes a piece of writing go "viral?" In other words, what makes a piece of nonfiction resonate with readers, many of whom may never have gone through the experiences about which the essay has been written? What are the reasons to write a personal essay? Is it for the writer to find meaning and healing, is it to connect with a community of others who feel the same way, is it to make passionate arguments about deeply held beliefs? How is the form of Personal Essay different from that of Memoir or Autobiography? These are the themes we will explore in this course. During the semester, we will read pieces by successful essay writers and identify the reasons why they have consistently struck a chord with readers. Additionally, the course will be a workshop for student writing in which we'll draw from our own life stories to write well-crafted, thematically cohesive, and pithy essays. Each student will submit at least two essays during the course of the semester which will be critiqued by the members of the class.

1250W.01 - Introduction to Poetry
Beth Bachmann
MWF, 12:10 - 1:00 PM

The aim of this course is to cultivate critical reading and writing skills for analyzing poetry. Through close readings, discussions and writing assignments, you will build a vocabulary for thinking about poetry and acquire tools for interpreting and appreciating poems. It is my hope that by learning to read and write about poetry, you will develop your own responses to the questions, ‘what is poetry’ and ‘why poetry matters.’
Course requirements: Participation 20%; response papers 10%; presentation 15%; essay one 15%; essay two 15%; essay three 25%.

1250W.02 - Introduction to Poetry
staff
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM

1250W.03 - Introduction to Poetry
Pavneet Aulakh
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM
"Poetry makes nothing happen," W. H. Auden wrote in his elegy for the Irish poet William Butler Yeats. Describing it instead as "A way of happening, a mouth," he nonetheless emphasized its physicality in a way complementary to Yeats' own insistence on the material labor of "stitching and unstitching" language into a poem. Instead of writing poetry, he wrote, it would be "Better [to] go down upon your marrow bones / And scrub a kitchen pavement, or break stones," unless you're fully committed that is. In a far more idealizing vein, Sir Philip Sidney celebrated the "high-flying liberty of conceit" that enables poets to deliver us a "golden world" instead of the "brazen" one in which we live. In this course, we will engage with these definitions along with the broad range of means by which poetry has been defined and the ends to which it has been put to use. Treating our class as a singing school--where we will indeed sing on occasion (only metaphorically, so don't worry!)--we will begin by approaching poetry as a material craft involving the various elements of meter, rhyme, imagery, line construction, and formal organization. The goal here will be to gain an appreciation for, and sharpen our ears and eyes to, the making of poetry. Poets got their names after all because they were makers (πoeîv, to make). But in our journey through a history of poetry, we will also concentrate on the different purposes poetry has served: whether in the interests of private meditation, public protest, and even popular culture.

1250W.04 - Introduction to Poetry: Crazy, Stupid Love
Joanna Huh
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM
Is it really better to have love and lost than never to have loved at all? We'll examine love poetry from the classical to the modern period, considering how poetry has shaped our concept of love today. You'll compose three formal essays and a short creative writing piece, which will help you to become a more critical thinker, reader, writer, and communicator.

1250W.05 - Introduction to Poetry: Science in Verse 
Katie Mullins
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM

What do species extinction, atomic structure, and weather patterns have in common? Poets like Lucretius, Margaret Cavendish, and Sherman Alexie have explored each of these concepts in verse. We’ll explore how science and poetry complement each other, and examine the long history of intersection between these discourses. Your grade will be based on three writing-intensive projects that you’ll develop and revise throughout the semester: a close-reading essay, a scripted podcast, and an analytical research poster. You’ll leave the course with knowledge of the mechanics and aesthetics of poetry, an appreciation of the relationship between poetic form and scientific thought, and a better command of your own academic writing and revision skills.

1250W.06 - Introduction to Poetry
staff
MWF, 11:10 - 12:00

1250W.07 - Introduction to Poetry
staff
MWF, 12:10 - 1:00 PM

1250W.08 - Introduction to Poetry
staff
MWF, 12:10 - 1:00 PM

1250W.09 - Introduction to Poetry
Rick Hilles
TR, 9:35 - 10:50 AM

1250W.10 - Introduction to Poetry
staff
MWF, 2:10 - 3:00 PM

1250W.11 - Introduction to Poetry: That's So Epic!: Studying Epic Poetry Across Time
Claudia Ludwig
TR, 8:10 - 9:25 AM
What makes a poem "epic"? Develop your close reading and critical writing skills by exploring three exemplary epic poems, Gilgamesh, the Aeneid, and Paradise Lost, in order to better understand modern epic texts such as the Harry Potter series. You will work on three revised essays, ten short reading responses, and daily in-class writing exercises to learn about the genre of epic poetry and gain more confidence as a writer.

1250W.12 - Introduction to Poetry
staff
TR, 9:35 - 10:50 AM

1250W.13 - Introduction to Poetry: Poetry as Performance: From the Page, to the Stage, to the Screen
Courtney Brown
MWF, 8:10 - 9:00 AM
We'll confront various poetic forms and moments, from Renaissance, to the Harlem Renaissance, to contemporary slam poetry. Our focus on basic rhetorical analysis and strategy will help you build the tools necessary to engage with and improve upon your own writing both as process and as critical text.

1260W.01 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Shakespeare and Film
Lynn Enterline
MWF, 1:10 - 2:00 PM

Shakespeare was part of the film industry almost from its inception: the first Nickelodeon attractions showed the public a version of “King John.” This seminar puts Shakespeare’s plays in dialogue with film adaptations of them, ranging from Hollywood and BBC to avant-garde productions. And it is organized around topics that pertain both to sixteenth century and contemporary culture. For example: visual representation and political power; gender, cross-dressing, and cultural anxiety; education and class. Even students who have little familiarity with Shakespeare will find that the course is structured to give them plenty of time to absorb and interpret his work, since we read and discuss the play texts before watching and discussing film interpretations of each. The class will acquaint students with drama in both comic and tragic modes, consider the difference between theatrical practices and film production, and familiarize students with a variety of ways to think about film “authorship.” Finally, it will enable students to learn the basics of literary and visual interpretation and to bring those skills to bear as they learn the art of the analytic essay.
Texts to include: Measure for Measure, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Macbeth, Othello, Titus Andronicus, and selected sonnets.
Films to include: Shekar Kapur, Elizabeth (1998), Kenneth Branagh, Much Ado About Nothing (1993), Richard Eyre, Stage Beauty (2004), Rupert Goold, Macbeth (2010), Peter Hall, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1968), John Madden, Shakespeare in Love (1998), Trevor Nunn, Twelfth Night (1996), Oliver Parker, Othello (1996), Julie Taymor, Titus (2000), Franco Zeffirelli, Taming of the Shrew (1967).

1260W.02 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Film and the Ethics of Desire: Love and the Body in the Film Image
Sam Girgus
TR, 2:35 - 3:50 PM

“Film and the Ethics of Desire” sees the body in film as a scene for enacting an ethical philosophy of sexual difference that transforms the flesh and renews time. The study argues that the body in film inevitably entails an ethical encounter in its engagement with the other and in its social and cultural contexts. While film in a society of image, media, and manipulation historically promotes the exploitation of a spatially-framed and confined sexual body, film also can envisage the redemption of a new time of infinite ethical alterity. Film can engender meaning through the embodied Levinasian “face” of love and responsibility for the other. Reading Emmanuel Levinas, Julia Kristeva, and Lucy Irigaray, it becomes possible to see in film an embodied merging of eros and ethics that imitates what Irigaray would call the time and “wonder” of eros.
Bridging ethics and psychoanalysis, the class proposes that the thought of Levinas, Kristeva, and Irigaray intersects on love, the body, and the other to provide a critical apparatus for studying the crisis of the ineluctable embodied relationship between eros and ethics on screen. Despite their differences, these three thinkers cohere in seeing the body as the vital center in a philosophical, psychological, and cultural struggle for revivifying our understanding of the significance of the relationship between love and ethics in our time. Thus, this project in film integrates Levinas’s philosophy of radical ethical demand, Irigaray’s program for embodied love and identity, and Kristeva’s psychoanalytical approach to love, culture, and history.

1260W.03 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
staff
TR, 2:35 - 3:50 PM

1260W.04 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
staff
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM

1260W.05 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
staff
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM

1260W.06 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
staff
TR, 2:35 - 3:50 PM

1260W.07 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
staff
TR, 2:35 - 3:50 PM

1260W.08 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Contemporary Asian America through Novels, Film, and Television
Piyali Bhattacharya
TR, 4:00 - 5:15 PM

In this class, we will read work by modern Asian American writers such as Ruth Ozeki, Jhumpa Lahiri, Ed Lin, Nayomi Munaweera, Chang Rae Lee, Tanwi Nandini Islam, and Lan Samantha Chang. We will also be taking a look at films such as "Harold and Kumar Go To White Castle" and "The Reluctant Fundamentalist," as well as certain episodes of TV shows like ABC's "Fresh Off The Boat," written by Eddie Huang, and Netflix's "Master of None," written by Aziz Ansari. Through the lens of these texts, we will examine what it means to develop cultural and political identities; how history, literature, and media shape those identities; and vice versa. We will also examine how gender, class, and immigration status affect the identity politics of various kinds of Asian American communities, and what part art plays in sharpening and minimizing those divides. Finally, we will use these texts as a springboard to examine how these issues play out in our own local communities, and how we can and must contribute to discussions on these topics through continuous and critical awareness of the art, literature, and media that is created by, about, and around us.

1260W.13 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Man Behind the Myth
Magana Kabugi
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM
Preacher, prophet, teacher, husband, father, troublemaker, Communist, radical icon. These are all terms that come to mind when different people think of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. But none of these terms really allow us to critically engage with the questions of who he was or how we can separate the man from the myths and legends surrounding his life and work. Through examining his writings, recorded speeches, philosophical influences, cultural conceptions of him, and the literary works that were on his bookshelf, we will engage with his teachings to better understand the man himself.

1260W.14 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Alex Dubilet
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM

1260W.15 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
staff
MWF, 3:10 - 4:00 PM

1260W.16 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
Alex Dubilet
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

1260W.17 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
staff
MW, 4:00 - 5:15 PM

1260W.18 - Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis
staff
MW, 4:00 - 5:15 PM

1270W.01 - Introduction to Literary Criticism
staff
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

1270W.02 - Introduction to Literary Criticism
staff
MWF, 1:10 - 2:00 PM

1280.01 - Beginning Fiction Workshop
Carla Diaz
MWF, 3:10 - 4:00 PM

1280.02 - Beginning Fiction Workshop
Alina Grabowski
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM

1290.01 - Beginning Poetry Workshop
Sophie Stid
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM

1290.02 - Beginning Poetry Workshop
Cydnee Devereaux
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

2200.01 - Foundations of Literary Study
Elizabeth Covington
MWF, 1:10 - 2:00 PM

In this course, we will investigate the different modes of power and violence in Anglophone literary texts of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across the globe. These texts draw on themes of war, racism, patriarchy, heterosexual normativity, and class to contemplate the differential power relationships within and between people of various cultures. Incorporating frames of literary and critical theory, we will interrogate universal and culturally contextual modes of power and violence and consider the role of literary production in relation to the reproduction of and resistance to structures of domain.

2200.02 - Foundations of Literary Study
Elizabeth Covington
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

In this course, we will investigate the different modes of power and violence in Anglophone literary texts of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across the globe. These texts draw on themes of war, racism, patriarchy, heterosexual normativity, and class to contemplate the differential power relationships within and between people of various cultures. Incorporating frames of literary and critical theory, we will interrogate universal and culturally contextual modes of power and violence and consider the role of literary production in relation to the reproduction of and resistance to structures of domain.

2200.03 - Foundations of Literary Study: Lost and Found/ations of Literary Study
John Bradley
MWF, 2:10 - 3:00 PM

Already enjoying getting lost in a good book? In this course we’ll get lost together in some amazing literature from the  twentieth and twenty-first century, while also persistently asking ourselves: How do we go about finding meaning—often constructing or creating meaning—in literature as apprentice literary scholars? This course will introduce you to approaches to reading and interpreting texts that are basic to the study of literature. You’ll gain these tolls for orienting yourself to literary texts and writing confidently about them as we read stories, plays, and poetry organized around ideas of loss and disorientation and opposing ideas of order and disorder as experienced in this century and the last—all part of our course theme: “Lost and Found/ations of Literary Study.”
Why “lost and found?” Here’s the idea: Serious study begins not with certainties, but with entering unfamiliar territory and facing thorny, often unsettled questions. To help you begin asking those questions and finding your way to answers, we’ll face what it means to get a little lost ourselves in and as a result of studying literary works, all in service of building a solid foundation for yourself as a student of literature.
Required reading will include Alice Oswald’s Memorial: A Version of Homer’s Illiad, Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, a unit on ecopoetry, and Jonathan Culler’s Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Writing assignments will include two analytical essays, a creative writing assignment, and a final project informed by research.

2200.04 - Foundations of Literary Study
Mark Wollaeger
TR, 2:35 - 3:50 PM

This course aims to prepare you for the English major (regardless of track) by introducing fundamental concepts of literary analysis, from close reading to periodization, as well as some key issues in literary criticism and theory. We will read poetry and fiction, along with some critical, contextual, and theoretical texts in order to widen your range of options when thinking about how to talk and write about literature. Writing assignments and exercises will include attention to the effective sources (e.g., critical, contextual, theoretical) to enhance your analyses and arguments and to ways pf tapping into your creativity as both a critical and creative writer. Indeed, the course presupposes deep affinities between creative and critical thought. Requirements: three essays, three exercises, regular attendance and participation.

2310.01 - Representative British Writers (from the beginning to 1660)
Roger Moore
TR, 9:35 - 10:50 AM

This course will serve as an introduction to some of the major works of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Restoration. Our major readings will include Anglo-Saxon poems, selections from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, The Book of Margery Kempe, and a Shakespeare play. We will also read selections from the poetry of Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, and Milton. Works will be read in light of contemporary cultural, philosophical, and religious contexts. Assignments will include quizzes, two papers, and midterm and final exams.
(HISTORY/PRE-1800)

2316.01 - Representative American Writers
Gabriel Briggs
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM

This course will cover the rise of the novel in the United States from the end of the revolutionary period to the 1850s. We will read the work of authors who dominate American literary history, such as Charles Brockden Brown, James Fenimore Cooper, and Herman Melville, but we will also study additional writers who challenge conventional wisdom, and help us imagine alternative literary histories in the U.S. In our reading, we will focus on two related questions: How does the novel capture the social and political pressures of a particular historical movement? Where is the line between fiction and history, dreams, and reality? The novels we will examine cut across several literary genres, including the Sentimental Novel, the American Gothic, and the Historical Romance, and we will attempt both to understand and to theorize the relationship between literary and historical writing.

2316W.01 - Representative American Writers
Gabriel Briggs
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM

This course will cover the rise of the novel in the United States from the end of the revolutionary period to the 1850s. We will read the work of authors who dominate American literary history, such as Charles Brockden Brown, James Fenimore Cooper, and Herman Melville, but we will also study additional writers who challenge conventional wisdom, and help us imagine alternative literary histories in the U.S. In our reading, we will focus on two related questions: How does the novel capture the social and political pressures of a particular historical movement? Where is the line between fiction and history, dreams, and reality? The novels we will examine cut across several literary genres, including the Sentimental Novel, the American Gothic, and the Historical Romance, and we will attempt both to understand and to theorize the relationship between literary and historical writing.

2318W.01 - World Literature, Classical
Julia Fesmire
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM

“I don’t think writers are sacred, but words are.  They deserve respect.  If you get the right ones in the right order, you can nudge the world a little or make a poem which children will speak for you when you’re dead.”
The above quotation from Tom Stoppard’s The Real Thing explains why I think the study of literature is important.  This course is an opportunity to become familiar with some of the most powerful texts of our literary tradition.  The texts I have chosen for this class will, I hope, provide an opportunity for us to learn something about how literature has developed and changed from classical antiquity through the Renaissance.  We will focus on concepts of heroism and courage, paying particular attention to the hero’s reaction to change, instability, adversity, and death.  How do these texts portray the task of the hero?  How does his quest affect relations between mortals and immortals?  Within the models offered by our texts, is it possible for women to be heroic?  How do fear and grief become avenues for challenging the social and order, and how do these emotions contribute towards the hero’s education?
Texts will include: Cervantes, Don Quixote (trans. Edith Grossman, Harper Collins); Euripides, Medea (trans. Rex Warner, Dover); Ferdowsi, The Tragedy of Sohráb and Rostám (trans. Jerome W. Clinton, U of Wash. Press); Gilgamesh (Stephen Mitchell version, Free Press); Homer, The Iliad (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin); The Letters of Abelard and Heloise (trans. Betty Radice, Penguin); Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (trans. Armitage, Norton); The Song of Igor’s Campaign (trans. Nabokov, Ardis).
(HISTORY/PRE-1800)

2319W.01 - World Literature, Modern: What in the World is World Literature?
Akshya Saxena
TR, 2:35 - 3:50 PM
What in the World is World Literature? Quite simply, this is the question our course is asking! In its most expansive sense, however, we are interested in the relationship between what is understood as globalization, literature, and the organization of literary studies. With both the world and literature being fiercely contested categories, how do we make sense of the idea and allure of a singular canon of world literature? How does an intellectual stake in "world literature" illuminate imaginations and contestations of cosmopolitanism, worldliness, nation states, and the idea that there is one humanity? What is the role of translation from and to globally hegemonic languages such as English and French in consolidating a world literature? What does world literature have to do with markets and orientalism? Does "world literature" run the risk of lapsing into a kind of literary tourism?
We will work through these questions (and formulate many more!) through a wide variety of literary and theoretical texts. We will examine the ways in which the category of "World Literature" has been imagined in different time periods, literary cultures, and geopolitical contexts through the writings of Goethe, Karl Marx, Martin Heidegger, Gayatri, Spivak, Rabindranath Tagore, Jing Tsu, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, et cetera. Equally important, we will read texts considered examples of "Modern World Literature" that complicate the notion of one humanity and one world. Readings will include works by Naguib Mahfouz (Egypt), Assia Djebar (Algeria), Derek Walcott (St. Lucia), Salman Rushdie (India), Rabindranath Tagore (India), Lu Xun (China), Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Colombia), and Okot p'Bitek (Uganda) among others.
(DIVERSE PERSPECTIVE)

2320.01 - Southern Literature: Making History, Reading Fiction
Colin Dayan
TR, 9:35 - 10:50 AM

What is the South? How do we understand what it means to be “Southern”? We will begin the semester with C. Vann Woodward’s Grady McWhiney’s, Cracker Culture: Celtic Ways in the Old South and C. Vann Woodward’s The New Jim Crow. Our next readings will be antebellum slave cases (1830-1858). After a discussion of histories of the Civil War—and the battle over symbols—we will ask how writers of fiction grappled with questions of race and romance, gothic terror and amorous bondage, turning briefly to Edgar Allan Poe, Lydia Maria Child, Harriet Jacobs, and more familiar twentieth and twenty-first century writers such as Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Cormac McCarthy, Jesmyn Ward, and Ta-Nehisi Coates.
Requirements: Class participation, weekly response papers, a presentation, and a final paper.

3210.01 - Intermediate Nonfiction Writing: Advocacy Writing
Sandy Solomon
M, 3:10 - 6:00 PM

To make your case in business and politics, you must write with precision and economy: your audience usually consists of busy people with many other issues to consider, so your argument has to be clear and concise, the evidence compelling. Over the course of the semester, students will write about a variety of public policy issues, topics they chose to consider. The class will participate and discuss such forms as the one-page lobbying document or letter, the op-ed piece, the speech, the article that embodies a public policy argument. In each instance, students will advocate a course of action: “we should/we should not do X;” they will learn to muster research to support their arguments and to attack opposing arguments. Students will offer critiques of each other’s written assignments in a series of workshops.
Those who register for this class will join a waiting list at first. They should write a 250-word essay about a public policy issue (or excerpt a section of a paper written for another class about a public policy issue) and then e-mail that account to Solomon by August 12 with the subject heading, “English 3210 Advocacy Writing Sample.” The writing sample need not advocate a course of action; it may just describe or analyze a law or federal, state or local policy. Then, in the week before the semester starts, Solomon will select class participants and e-mail all people on the waiting list to tell them whether they have gained admission.

3210.02 - Intermediate Nonfiction Writing: Life Writing: Memoirs about People, Places, Historical Moments
Sandy Solomon
W, 3:10 - 6:00 PM

Of the forms of creative nonfiction, memoir is arguably the most popular. Why so? Writers of good memoirs transform the raw material of their loves into a story that a reader may recognize as instructive, insightful, and true to life. As memoirists consider on the page what really happened, they often create in their reader a sense of discovery that parallels their own. They evaluate the past from the perspective of the present, and, in doing so, weigh what they know now against what they knew then to create a complex understanding of what happened and why. The memoirist’s medium is time; managing the reader’s understanding of time becomes one of the writer’s foremost concerns.
Many common topics for memoir—overcoming hardship or illness, coping with substance abuse or tragedy, achieving celebrity, to name a few—do not readily lend themselves to student creative writing assignments. This course will concentrate instead on three kinds of experiences that offer interesting subject matter for most people: other people, places, and a historical moment (a remembered event or socio-economic-cultural juncture). We will read memoirs of all three kinds, and then students will write memoirs that look through these different lenses. The course will emphasize not just writing, but also revision, the re-vision necessary to enrich a narrative—give prose more punch, clarity and interest; evoke the world in more compelling detail. These concerns inform good writing in all genres.
Students who register for this class will join a waiting list at first. They should write a 250-word memoir about a family member—someone about whom they can offer a complex portrait (written in first person)—and then e-mail that account to Solomon by August 12 with the subject heading, “English 3210 Memoir Writing Sample.” Then, in the week before the semester starts, Solomon will select class participants and e-mail all people on the waiting list to tell them whether they have gained admission.

3230.01 - Intermediate Fiction Workshop
Justin Quarry
W, 3:10 - 6:00 PM

This workshop is geared toward those who already have some experience writing short stories, with the intentions of broadening students’ knowledge of the elements of craft and strengthening their utilization of narrative techniques, and of incorporating elements of fantasy in literary fiction. The chief texts for this course will be approximately thirty stories written by workshop members, but throughout the semester students also will read and examine craft essays and contemporary American short fiction in order to better understand how to apply what they learn to their own writing. The final for the course will consist of a significant revision of one or two original short stories produced during the semester. Previous creative writing workshop experience is strongly recommended before taking this class, and instructor permission is required to enroll. Sign up on the course’s YES waitlist, and you will receive application instructions for the course in early May.

3230.02 - Intermediate Fiction Workshop
Nancy Reisman
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM

This Intermediate Workshop is designed to help emerging fiction writers to expand their understanding of fiction’s possibilities, to deepen their knowledge of craft and technique, to refine their own artistic visions, and to collectively create a writing community. We’ll focus primarily on character-based literary fiction (from realism to surrealism and certain uses of the fantastic. Please note: this is not a workshop for fantasy, science fiction, or other world-building genres). The workshop is a studio class, centered on the development of your own original short stories and flash fictions. Throughout the semester, we’ll read published work by a broad range of contemporary, delve into craft, and explore aspects of the creative process. We’ll investigate story structure and narrative strategies, point of view/perception, characterization, movements in time, uses of place, and other elements. The course involves regular reading of and responses to the work of other writers and requires both generosity in those endeavors and receptivity to feedback on one’s own work-in-progress. Previous creative writing workshop experience in highly recommended. Instructor permission is required. After course selection, I’ll be in touch with interested students to request a brief writing sample (anticipated sample deadline will be in August).

3250.01 - Intermediate Poetry Workshop
Mark Jarman
M, 2:10 - 5:00 PM

This class is a workshop in which we will study the craft of poetry writing. As such, this semester we will concentrate on traditional elements of poetry—meter, rhyme, and form. In other words, this will be a class in verse as much as poetry. Each week, using our texts, we will discuss an aspect of what is called prosody: metric feet, rhyme schemes, stanzas, and forms like the ballad, the sonnet, the villanelle, the ghazal, the epigram, and the sestina. You will discover there is a wide latitude within the limitations of form, which is not surprising considering that most poetry in English is formal verse rather than free verse, the latter being relatively young and largely American innovation. But we will talk about free verse, too, even the prose poem, and if you are oppressed by the mere notion of writing in rhyme and meter, you will have the opportunity to write one poem without those restraints.
Once you have been added to the waiting list for this class, you should send me, via e-mail, three examples of your poetry. They do not have to be formal verse.

3314.01 - Chaucer
Leah Marcus and Rick Hilles
TR, 2:35 - 3:50 PM
(HISTORY/PRE-1800)

3316.01 - Medieval Literature
Pavneet Aulakh
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM
Whether it be in the mythical quest narrative of The Lord of the Rings, or the dark, anti-chivalric intrigue of Game of Thrones, or even the comic temporal disjunction of Twitter accounts like "Donaeld the Unready" or "Chaucer Tweets," the medieval world continues ti animate our imaginations. Over the course of this semester, and through our readings of medieval Arthurian romances in particular, we will explore the roots of our (nostalgic? haunted?) remediation of chivalric literature and our broader cultural fascination with medieval culture. But in contextualizing our readings in the history of that culture and engaging with a more expansive spectrum of its literature, including mystery plays (artisan-sponsored and produced dramatizations of scriptural narratives), poetic dream visions, and the Christian mysticism of, for example, Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe (author of what is believed to be the first autobiography in English), we will not only confront an alien time, but also gain an appreciation for the period's complexities and the manifold ways in which the medieval world continues to challenge and simultaneously speak to our modern concerns.
(HISTORY/PRE-1800)

3336.01 - Shakespeare (comedy and history)
Kathryn Schwarz
MWF, 1:10 - 2:00 PM
This course focuses on the first half of Shakespeare's career, during which he wrote histories, comedies, and tragedies. Rather than take a strictly chronological approach, we will look at clusters of plays that invite us to think across genres. How does a tragedy such as Titus Andronicus ask the same questions about political instability as a history such as Richard III? How might a comedy such as Measure for Measure illuminate and complicate both the cultural idealism of Henry V and the cultural cynicism of Hamlet? If Richard II, Romeo and Juliet, and A Midsummer Night's Dream were written in roughly the same year, in what ways do they mediate on the same issues and problems, and in what ways do those issues and problems change shape in response to the demands of form? Throughout the semester, we will look for different angles on what might broadly be termed politics: the politics of nationalism, gender, history, violence, identity, community, literary production, and social norms.
(HISTORY/PRE-1800)

3340.01 - Shakespeare: Representative Selections: Shakespearean Sexualities
Lynn Enterline
MWF, 2:10 - 3:00 PM

How different was Shakespeare’s thinking about human sexuality from our own? The plural form, “sexualities,” in the course title is meant to signify that when it comes to questions of gender, love, pleasure, and desire, Shakespeare’s imagination was both exuberant and not entirely bound by social norms. He is just as capable of writing love poems to a young man as to a woman; and his dramatic depictions of sexuality propose imaginary communities in which both homo- and hetero-erotic desires mingle and clash. In his depictions of love, myriad forms of emotion, bodily engagement, aim, and object range widely and often strain against social contracts and definitions of acceptable gendered behavior.
The course is designed to introduce students to all of Shakespeare’s genres—lyric and narrative as well as dramatic poetry—and will do so while focusing on the intersection between sexuality and the rhetorical forms he favors most. The reading is organized around two, interrelated issues central to Shakespeare’s education in classical rhetoric and poetic practice: on the one hand, his distinctive ways of revisiting the generic, rhetorical, and/or linguistic conventions he inherited; on the other, the erotic predicaments that arise from the language choices his characters (and narrators) make. Because both his education and poetic practice drew heavily on ancient and continental precursors—here the sixteenth century humanist practice of invention through imitation is crucial—the seminar will study each Shakespearean text alongside the love poetry that inspired him throughout his career: Ovid’s polymorphous and often perverse poem, The Metamorphoses; and the melancholic voice of unrequited desire in the “scattered rhymes” of the fourteenth century Italian love-poet, Petrarch.
Texts to include:
(Sexuality, rhetoric, and authorship) Ovid, Metamorphoses 1-3; 10-11; Shakespeare, sonnets (selections); Shakespeare, “The Phoenix and the Turtle”
(Rhetoric and polymorphous perversity) Petrarch, Scattered Rhymes (selections); Selection from Freud, Three Essays on a Theory of Sexuality; Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis; A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Macbeth
(Gender and sexuality in Renaissance education) The Taming of the Shrew, The Rape of Lucrece, Titus Andronicus, Othello, Hamlet, A Winter’s Tale.
(HISTORY/PRE-1800)

3348.01 - Milton
Pavneet Aulakh
MWF, 1:10 - 2:00 PM
At the start of Paradise Lost, John Milton tells us that his intention is to "justify the ways of God to man." As we will discover over the course of this semester, however, Milton's epic expansion of a couple of characters of "Genesis" is much more than a moralizing or didactic dramatization of Adam and Eve's fall from Edenic bliss and the tragic results that it incurred. Rather, this work meditates on questions that continue to inform our present concerns, ranging from environmentalism and the dangers of populist rhetoric to the value of pursuing knowledge and the (heroic?) sacrifices to which love might compel us. In this course, we will attend to why Milton--even as a study of this works may no longer be a standard component of the English major--continues to matter. But we will also examine how he used his writings and print to fashion the canonical authority that made him matter in the first place.
(HISTORY/PRE-1800)

3614.01 - The Victorian Period: Sex and Death
Elizabeth Meadows
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM

Why is sexuality so often linked to death in Victorian literature and culture? What does the coupling of sex and death in the fiction, poetry, prose, and art of this supposedly-repressed period reveal about Victorian conceptions of self and other, class and gender, science and art? Develop critical reading skills by examining texts such as Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s In Memoriam, and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, while building a firm understanding of the historical and social contexts of the time. Expand your horizons for critical and creative writing through drafting and revising formal essays, crafting a mid-term exam, and creating a multimedia final project.

3640.01 - Modern British and American Poetry
Mark Jarman
MWF, 1:10 - 2:00 PM

This course will consider those modern poets, writing in English, primarily between 1900 and 1950, who left a strong imprint on the poetry of their own time and subsequently: W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, H.D. (Hilda Doolitte), William Carlos, Marianne Moore, and Wallace Stevens. In this first half of the twentieth century, each of these poets created a unique style that embodied his or her personal vision of the poet and the modern world. All were born in the later nineteenth century. All but Yeats, who was Irish, were Americans. Yeats, despite living and working many years in London, was strongly attached to his childhood home in County Sligo, and played a critical role in the formation of modern Irish literature and culture. Eliot, born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, and H.D., born and raised in Pennsylvania, were expatriates, living in London in Eliot’s case, and in H.D.’s case, in various places throughout Europe, with her longtime partner, Annie Ellerman, known as Bryher. Eliot became an English citizen and is claimed by both the U.S. and England. Williams lives and worked as a doctor in the place of his birth, Rutherford, New Jersey. Marianne Moore lived most of her life in New York City, working for a time at the New York Public Library. Wallace Stevens was an insurance executive in Hartford, Connecticut. We will consider these poets’ association with place, culture, society, and the history of their times. For all of them, the art of poetry was foremost. Class will consist of an ongoing discussion of their poems and, where relevant, their prose. These will be two papers, regular homework assignments, and a final.
(HONORS SEMINAR: A 3.4 CUMULATIVE GPA IS REQUIRED)

3644.01 - Twentieth-Century American Novel
Hortense Spillers
TR, 9:35 - 10:50 AM
Focused on work produced by a select number of U.S. writers poised between 1900 and 1945, this course traces the major trend lines of the American novel and its responses to modernist persuasions. Beginning with the controversial work of Theodore Dreiser--Sister Carrie-- we will pursue the twists and turns of the novel as it is negotiated in the writings of Edith Wharton, Jean Toomer, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner.
This course is designed to achieve four key objectives: 1) to provide an introduction to the reading, study, and analysis of instances of U.S. fiction, primarily the novel; 2) to practice some of the rudiments of literary analysis by writing and speaking about these texts on a regular and consistent basis; 3) to take up aspects of the question of the canon--what makes certain fiction not only endure, or outlast changes of fashion, but also to assume central importance in a nation's or group's literary and cultural identity? Why do we read some fiction and not others? Why does it matter who is in the canon it out of it? 4) to try to grasp what is at stake when we address literary analysis as a discourse. Even though the fourth element is thought to be the main concern of the "English major," we hope to make the effort to understand the making of literary and critical discourse as an example of critique (or critical thinking) for a wider readership. The course is open, then, not only to English majors, but also to those whom Virginia Woolf addressed as the "common reader," or in this case, the student with intellectual curiosity and whose commitment to reading demonstrates growing maturity. With strong examples before us, we hope to take inspiration for substantive argument, challenging thought, and the eloquence and precision of expression, both written and spoken.

3650.01 - Ethnic American Literature: Race, Gender, and Confinement in the United States
Marzia Milazzo
TR, 4:00 - 5:15 PM

In this course, we will examine the relationship between race, gender, ideas of freedom, and experiences of confinement in U.S. literature and culture, focusing primarily on the period since World War II. Through the study of multiple genres and media (including fiction, drama, poetry, ethnography, film, music, and news media), students will examine how a differential access to space, mobility, and resources shapes not only literary imaginaries and representation, but also historical and contemporary social conditions in the United States. Themes we will address include segregation, internment, the school-to-prison pipeline, and the death penalty. Students will acquire analytical tools that enable them to appreciate the formal qualities of a text, engage it from an interdisciplinary perspective, gain an understanding of the socio-historical contexts that shaped it, and finally relate it to their own experiences. In the process, they will learn to recognize concepts such as race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and nationality as socially, historically, geographically and discursively constructed, and yet as having real and important implications.
Required books: Mumia Abu-Jamal, Live From Death Row; Jerry Flores, Caught Up: Girls, Surveillance, and Wraparound Incarceration; Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Cherríe Moraga, The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea; Toni Morrison, Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination; Julie Otsuka, When The Emperor Was Divine; *additional readings will be posted on Blackboard.
(DIVERSE PERSPECTIVE)

3654.01 - African American Literature
Houston Baker
TR, 11:00 - 12:15 PM

This course is designed and will be taught as an enjoyable and wide-ranging introduction to the world and works of Afro-American Literature. It commences with the fascinating narrative of an eighteenth-century African kidnapped from his village and cast into the worlds of Atlantic shipping, New World slavery, and Evangelical Religion. Its endpoint is the stunning and varied work of writers such as Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, Nikky Finney, and Percival Everett.
Along our chronological way, we shall read and discuss Afro-American folklore and nineteenth-century men’s and women’s slave narratives. We shall spend significant time on the glorious Harlem Renaissance of the roaring 1920s when, as Langston Hughes stated it: “Harlem was in vogue.” Social protest works like Richard Wright’s astonishing novel Native Son and James Baldwin’s famous attack on protest novels titled Everybody’s Protest Novel will provide energetic moments of discussion. The 1960s and 1970s Black Arts and Black Nationalist Movements of revolution in the streets and rebellion on the page will come alive for us in the works of authors such as Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Haiki Madhubuti, and Malcolm X.
Readings will be quite reasonable in size and scope, and there will be many in-class moments that feature a perfect combination of lecture by the professor and animated discussion by students. Written assignments will also be reasonable. The connection between Vanderbilt, Nashville, and our class will be an enjoyable project as we discover connections between the Afro-American creativity of our own university and city and the written works we will be studying.
(DIVERSE PERSPECTIVE)

3662.01 - Asian American Literature
Haerin Shin
TR, 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
(DIVERSE PERSPECTIVE)

3670W.01 - Colonial and Post-Colonial Literature: Global Englishes
Akshya Saxena
TR, 4:00 - 5:15 PM
How well do you know the English language? In this course, we will explore the diversity of what we understand as "English" through its literary, visual, digital, and sonic journeys around the world. We are interested in the multiple languages and cultural enclaves that already exist within the globally dominant "English." We are also interested in economics of accents and brands, and the profound materiality of English in global markets and media.
To this end, we will study fiction, poetry, film, and music in English from a variety of geopolitical contexts. We are looking at the United Kingdom, Australia, India, China, Nigeria, Ireland, and Kenya. This course understands the premise of language as power through histories of colonialism, decolonization, migration, technological innovation, globalization, and class and race conflict, that have spurred the spread and consolidation of the English language(s) as we know it. Readings will include works by Aimé Césaire, William Shakespeare, J. M. Coetzee, Salman Rushdie, Aravind Adiga, Mulk Raj, Agha Shahid Ali, Derek Walcott, Frantz Fanon, James Baldwin, and Zora Neale Hurston among others.
(DIVERSE PERSPECTIVE)

3681.01 - Twentieth-Century Drama
Bridget Orr
TR, 9:35 - 10:50
This course traces the arc of modern drama from the emergence of symbolist and naturalist plays in the late nineteenth century through the development of modernist and postmodernist theater in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will be reading plays by Strindberg, Ibsen, Wilde, Shaw, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, Pinter, Churchill, Soyinka, Hwang, Wertenbaker, and others. We will combine our readings with viewings of filmed versions of plays and at every point we will focus on the ways in which the performative nature of drama shapes its textualization.

3694.01 - America on Film: Art and Ideology
Sam Girgus
MW, 2:35 - 3:50 PM

This course studies American culture and character on film. It will consider film as a modern art form, a system of cultural production, and an expression of the diversity of the American experience. Beginning with a discussion of the structure and composition of film as an art form, the course will also consider the relationship of film to American studies, ethical philosophy, and culture. Thus, it will relate visual images and cinetext to cultural and philosophical contexts. We will examine how films treat basic American themes such as the individual and community; frontier and urban violence; race, ethnicity, and minorities; the representation and role of women; visual desire and sexual exploitation; the family and authority. We will study classic Hollywood directors, including Frank Capra, John Ford, Howard Hawks, and Elia Kazan as well as current filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Spike Lee, and Clint Eastwood.

3720.01 - Literature, Science, and Technology
Jonathan Lamb
TR, 9:35 - 10:50

This course will deal with the origin of modern science and its reflection in literature. It will isolate a division in attitudes to sensations and thought that was evident from the very start of what is known as empiricism. Roughly these can be characterized as neo-Platonic and materialist. The neo-Platonics did not view knowledge as an acquirement that perfected us, rather as a timeless truth that we recollected. Empiricists, much influenced by the Roman thinker Lucretius, for the most part powerfully believed in our imperfection, believing that the advancement of learning, as Bacon called it, was to begin the process of our salvation by curing us of the depravities we inherited at the Fall. This led to considerable differences in opinion regarding the usefulness of machines, particularly those that enhanced the receptivity of our senses, such as the microscope. On the one hand they allowed us to see what otherwise would have remained invisible; on the other they exposed the observer to such extraordinary sensations there was no standard by which they could be judged and rendered a common part of knowledge.
How this debate played out among experimental scientists and philosophers will be part of our concern, reading excerpts from Plato, Lucretius, Bacon, and Descartes and discovering how the debate was renewed in literature, such as Milton’s Paradise Lost, Bunyan’s Abounding, and Swift’s Tale of a Tub. We shall be paying special attention to the treatment of sensory perception, whether it is seen as the foundation of knowledge or an impediment to it. We shall notice a difference between an aesthetic approach to experience and a mathematical or geometrical one that is still evident today.
Sample Primary Texts: Bacon, The Advancement of Learning; Hooke, Micrographia; Swift, Tale of a Tub; Margaret Cavendish, Observations on the Experimental Philosophy; Milton, Paradise Lost; Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding; Marvell, The Garden; Addison, Spectator papers 411-421, ‘On the Pleasures of Imagination’; Pope, Essay on Man, Book I; Blake, Songs of Innocence and Experience; Mike Jay, The Influencing Machine.
Sample Secondary Reading: Steven Shapin and Simon Schaffer, Leviathan and the Air-Pump; Friedrich Kittler, Optical Media; Michel Serres, The Birth of Physics; John Bender and Michael Marinnan, The Culture of Diagram.
(APPROACH)

3730.01 - Literature and the Environment: What is Nature?
Rachel Teukolsky
MWF, 12:10 - 1:00 PM

What is nature? Is it found in a park where you wander among trees and cute forest animals? Is it an untouched, pristine wilderness? Are some of us closer to nature than others? This course examines the ways that artists and writers have constructed “nature” as an idealized place or set of qualities, partly imaginary, partly concrete. We will consider a broad range of literature, imagery, philosophy, and film, including clips from Disney nature films like Bambi; Steven Spielberg’s shark-shocker, Jaws; science fiction/eco-fiction by Octavia Butler (Dawn) and Margaret Atwood (Oryx and Crake); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; romantic nature poetry by Wordsworth and Keats; H. Thoreau, Walden (“Why I Went into the Woods”); Charles Darwin, Origin of Species; H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau; and Hayao Miyazaki’s animated film, Spirited Away.
(APPROACH)

3894.01 - Major Figures in Literature: Jane Austen
Andrea Hearn
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM

3894.02 - Major Figures in Literature: Ernest Hemingway
Gabriel Briggs
MWF, 12:10 - 1:00 PM

This course examines one of the most influential writers in twentieth-century American Literature. To better understand Hemingway’s enduring cultural presence, students will read a number of short stories, novels, and non-fiction prose he produced between 1924 and 1951. Students will also develop strategies for positioning the author and his work within specific historical and theoretical contexts. Among the selections we will read are In Our Time (1924), The Sun Also Rises (1926), Men Without Women (1927), A Farewell to Arms (1929), For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940), and The Old Man and the Sea (1952). It is recommended that students complete longer works over the summer in order to provide ample time for reading and reflection during the fall semester.

3894.03 - Major Figures in Literature: Oscar Wilde and the 1890s
Rachel Teukolsky
MWF, 1:10 - 2:00 PM

“I was a man who stood in symbolic relations to the art and culture of my age.” So wrote Oscar Wilde in 1897, from the confinement of a prison cell. Wilde’s career offers a revealing glimpse into late-Victorian culture and society—from his roots in Ireland, to his ascent in London society as a celebrated wit and playwright, to his stunning arrest and imprisonment for “acts of gross indecency” with other men. This course will examine Wilde’s writings within the context of the last decade of the nineteenth century, when anxieties about the fate of British culture and empire spurred a kind of conservative hysteria, along with the subversive counter-culture known as “decadence.” Texts will include Wilde’s poetry, essays on art, aesthetics, and socialism, his plays The Importance of Being Earnest and Lady Windermere’s Fan, and his gothic novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. We will also consider his decadent play Salomé, banned by London censors and published in book form with illustrations by Aubrey Beardsley. Other authors and artists will help us to understand the rebellious art-culture of the 1890s: Walter Pater, R. L. Stevenson, J. K. Huysmans, Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Symons, J. M. Whistler, D. G. Rossetti, George Egerton, and Michael Field, among others.

3894.04 - Major Figures in Literature: Toni Morrison
Hortense Spillers
TR, 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Toni Morrison, one of the world's foremost writers, nearly single-handedly shifted the emphasis in U.S canonical writing to African-American and women creative intellectuals; making her debut c. 1969, with the magazine RedBook's serialization of the novel, The Bluest Eye, Morrison would go on to dominate the world of letters for the next three decades, culminating with the publication of Beloved in the late 1980s and a Nobel prize for literature in 1993. Morrison has kept up a prolific outflow of work, including novels and critical essays, well into the new century. This course is devoted to a sustained examination of Morrison's major work and will include most of the novels, the play, Emmett Till, and the influential critical study, Playing in the Dark. This course is all Morrison all the time.
(HONORS SEMINAR: A 3.4 CUMULATIVE GPA IS REQUIRED)

3896.01 - Special Topics in Investigative Writing in America: Investigative Writing on the Environment: Telling the Story of Climate Change
Amanda Little
MWF, 9:10 - 10:00 AM
How do we tell stories of crisis and ingenuity? The climate change phenomenon presents a fascinating blend of both: As warming temperatures pose unprecedented ecological threats, activists and politicians are struggling to define a path forward and innovators are forging new discoveries in energy, transportation, architecture, and food production. Climate change is transforming our industries, our politics, our culture, and our daily lives.
This course will explore the thrill and challenge of researching and documenting historic change. In books, articles, blogs, websites, and twitter feeds, we'll sample a broad range of writing on this topic, exploring the science, the solutions, the players, the politics, the history, and the local impacts of climate change. We will Skype with professional journalists, editors and bloggers into the classroom. In past semesters, we've spoken with Juliet Eilperin of the Washington Post, Andrew Revkin of The New York Times, Jessi Hempel of Wired, David Roberts of Vox.com, Bryan Walsh of TIME, "cli-fi" author Nathaniel Rich, and Mark Gunther at The Guardian.
Students will pursue their own local reporting, investigating the effects of climate change and the emerging green economy in Nashville. You will learn the rudiments of good journalism, and are welcome to join with or without previous journalism experience. This course aims to change the way you think about the importance and impact of storytelling, the way you write about complex topics with accessible and engaging prose, and the way you participate in the time of change and progress we live in.

3898.01 - Special Topics in English and American Literature: Joyce Exclusive of Ulysses
Roy Gottfried
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM
Examination of Joyce's other works, with an appreciation for biographical elements, Irish and British cultural contexts, and the variety of styles.
Readings include: Dubliners, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, selections from Finnegans Wake, a  short biography.
One short paper; one term paper.

3898.02 - Special Topics in English and American Literature: Business Leaders' Bookshelves
Cecelia Tichi
TR, 9:35 - 10:50 AM

Includes books recommended by business leaders, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, Jeff Bezos and others. The titles are surprising. The CEOs bypass “How-To” titles to find their deeper understanding in novels and other narratives, some classics of the past, some current. We will read some—NOT ALL—chapters from Moby-Dick, also The Boys in the Boat, The Art of War, Diet for a Small Planet, The Innovator’s Dilemma, and others, about 10 books altogether. The course somewhat adapts from a popular Harvard Business School course on business ethics, its focus: “Reading for Leading” and “Reading for Action.”
Students will work on a portfolio (short essays responsive to the readings) and make presentations. We will operate as a seminar.

4960.01 - Senior Year Capstone: Valuing the English Major
Mark Wollaeger
TR, 4:00 - 5:15 PM

Ever wanted a better answer when one of your parents’ friends remarks of your English major, “What are you going to do with that?” This course is designed to promote reflection on the problem of value in American society as it finds expression in contemporary debates about the future of the humanities by returning to influential Romantic articulations of the problem and working our way forward. It also asks you to reflect on your career as an English major in relation to possible futures after college. The question of what one will do with an English major scripts the literature student as an impractical soul with few opportunities for employment who is destined to work as a barista. This is obviously a false narrative, but what gives it staying power? How, in this context, do we articulate and assess the value of an English major, and of literature more generally, in a time of economic precarity, rapid change, and pressure toward the “useful,” narrowly construed? What determines value? The market? The individual? Social institutions? What should a major “do” for you? Is close reading marketable? How do we “think value” outside the market? Is the historical association between the humanities and the imagining of freedom still viable today? To explore such questions, we’ll begin with contemporary debates about the humanities and the university before leaping back to some influential texts from the past, from Friedrich Schiller’s notion of aesthetic education in the late eighteenth century and Percy Shelley’s vision of heroic aesthetic empowerment, to nineteenth century debates about utilitarianism and “liberal education,” up through contemporary debates about the social efficacy of literary identity politics (invoked last fall in the wake of the presidential election) and the mission of higher education. We’ll also read literary texts that bear on these questions, including versions of the so-called industrial novel (Dickens’s Hard Times and Forster’s Howards End), which uses romance conventions to assess the seemingly opposed values of business and the arts; a campus novel (Lodge’s Nice Work) that raises related issues; poetry that self-consciously addresses questions of the value of the aesthetic (Auden, Yeats, and Moore); and contemporary literature deeply engaged with the politics of everyday life (Claudia Rankin and Ali Smith). Finally, we’ll study one other kind of text as well: the essays you have written for other classes in the English major over the course of your college career; these you’ll reconfigure into a culminating wiki project that locates the concerns of the course in the history of your own writing, with an eye toward your future beyond the English major. Requirements: regular response pages and participation; a midterm; and the final wiki project.

4960.02 - Senior Year Capstone: Pulitzer Prize Winners
Rebecca Chapman
TR, 1:10 - 2:25 PM

4998.01 - Honors Colloquium
Teresa Goddu
TR, 4:00 - 5:15 PM

The Honors Colloquium prepares students to write their Honors Thesis in the spring (Engl. 4999). Through shared readings, students will explore a range of critical, theoretical, and creative approaches to literary texts and practice a variety of methodologies. Students will also learn research methods, effective modes of argumentation, and creative technique. Over the course of the semester, students will choose and develop their topic as they work collaboratively together in writing groups. The semester culminates with students writing the first chapter of their thesis. The colloquium is reserved for students who have applied and been admitted to the English Honors Program.

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 Courses in other departments that are eligible for English:

ASIA 3151.01 - The Third World and Literature
Ben Tran
TR, 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

HONS 1840W.30 - College Honors Seminar in History and Culture of the United States: Writing the Twenty-First Century America
Cecelia Tichi
TR, 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

HONS 1860W.17 - Revolutionary Awakenings: From the Russian Revolution to the Age of Globalization
Allison Schachter
MWF, 10:10 - 11:00 AM

What is the experience of becoming a revolutionary? What are the histories and narratives of revolutionary awakening? How do they relate to our contemporary times? In this course, we will look at narratives by and about revolutionaries to examine how individuals come to identify with and commit themselves to revolutionary movements. We’ll analyze the personal and historical conditions that prompt individuals to embrace revolution and sacrifice themselves to larger movements. We’ll also consider how revolutionaries later understand, embrace, or even come to regret their political commitments. The course will begin with the Russian revolution and the socialist and anarchist precursors, including leading figures such as Emma Goldman, Leon Trotsky, and Rosa Luxembourg. We’ll read accounts by unknown figures who gave up their lives to fight fascism, whether in Poland, France or the battlefields of the Spanish Civil War. We’ll look at narratives of anti-colonial nationalism in Algeria, Vietnam, Germany, and here in the United States for example, groups like the Black Panthers and the Weather Underground. Finally, we’ll look at current-day revolutions, of which there are many: Occupy Wall Street, the Orange Revolution, the Arab Spring to name a few. Are we now living in revolutionary times? Readings will include, memoirs, prose fiction, films, and archival documents. We’ll experiment with various forms of writing, including literary analysis, personal narrative, and online media.  

JS 2250W.01 - Witnesses Who Were Not There: Literature of the Children of Holocaust Survivors
Adam Meyer
MWF, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM
While much has been written about and by those who survived the German concentration camps during World War II, both fiction and nonfiction, relatively little has been written about and by the children of these survivors. Beginning in the late 1970s and early 1980s, however, these "second generation" children began to raise their voices and discuss the Holocaust's impact on their lives, though they were not themselves present in the camps. This course is designed to look at these responses, as seen in both memoirs and fictional productions, in an attempt to understand the rationales and motivations behind their authors' diverse reactions to the events.

JS 2270W.01 - Jewish Storytelling
Allison Schachter
MW, 2:35 - 3:50 PM

This course examines the evolution of the modern Jewish short story, from the folksy style of Sholem Aleichem, whose work inspired Fiddler on the Roof, to the American master of the short story Grace Paley. Our readings and discussions will focus on the changing, but ever-present figure of the Jewish storyteller. We will ask how the storyteller transforms from a religious figure sharing morality tales to a modern, secular narrator. We will also discuss the form of the short story and the short story collection. We will look at contemporary forms of storytelling including oral history and podcasting. Students will experiment with different forms of writing, that will include personal narrative, shorts fiction, literary analysis, and online media. This course fulfills the diverse perspective requirement and may be used as a course from outside the discipline for the Creative Writing tract.
(DIVERSE PERSPECTIVE / CREATIVE WRITING)