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Asian Studies Course Descriptions

Effective Fall 2015, Vanderbilt University has introduced a new course catalog numbering scheme. For assistance with the translation between old (3-digit) and new (4-digit) numbers, please consult the Course Renumbering Lookup Tool.

ASIA 1001. Commons Seminar. [Formerly ASIA 99] Topics vary. General Elective credit only. [1] (No AXLE credit)

ASIA 1111. First-Year Writing Seminar. [Formerly ASIA 115F] Independent learning and inquiry in an environment in which students can express knowledge and defend opinions through intensive class discussion, oral presentations, and written expression. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication of topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits in any 1111 course per semester of enrollment. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

ASIA 1201. Writing Southeast Asia. [Formerly ASIA 150] Literary representations, including novels and personal memoirs, of the history of Southeast Asia. Colonial and postcolonial periods. Representations of pluralistic cultures, diverse languages, religions, and indigenous and national identities. Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. All texts in English translation. [3] (HCA)

ASIA 1680. Inside China. [Formerly ASIA 236] First-hand experience of China’s dynamic society and expanding economy. Guided exploration of famous historical sites and contemporary institutions such as hospitals, businesses, factories, and art galleries in Beijing and Shanghai. Interviews with individuals from many different walks of life, including physicians, entrepreneurs, migrant workers, and college students. No knowledge of Chinese is required. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (INT)

ASIA 2100W. Fashioning the Self: Coming of Age and Asian Modernities. [Formerly ASIA 200W] The coming-of-age novel (Bildungsroman) as a literary form in twentieth-century Asia. Travails of modernity and colonialism; the effects of crossing national, racial, and cultural boundaries; the experinces of traveling to urban centers, foreign countries, and ancestral lands. Texts from China, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, and Vietnam. Taught in English. [3] (INT)

ASIA 2210W. Hollywood Hanoi. [Formerly ASIA 250W] Cultural narratives of the Vietnam War, including novels and films. War and representation. International, minority, and antiwar perspectives on the violence and aftermath. Muhammad Ali, Werner Herzog, Jean Genet, Graham Greene, and Dinh Linh. All texts in English translation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1111 section 4. [3] (INT)

ASIA 2511. Popular Culture in Modern Japan. [Formerly ASIA 211] Popular culture in Japan from 1900 to the present. The rise of mass culture and media, song, sports, food, fashion, and popular film genres. [3] (INT)

ASIA 2512. Explorations of Japanese Animation. [Formerly ASIA 212] Introduction to the form and content of Japanese animation as globalized popular entertainment and as a speculative artistic medium that explores history and memory, nature and technology, human identity, carnivalesque comedy, and gender relations. [3] (INT)

ASIA 2513W. Media Monsters in Contemporary Japan. [Formerly ASIA 213W] The supernatural and the monstrous as represented in the context of mass media and consumerism in contemporary Japan. Liveaction J-horror films, popular fiction, Manga, animated films, and television series. [3] (HCA)

ASIA 2560. Current Japan–U.S. Relations. [Formerly ASIA 240] Similarities and differences in theory and practice in the United States and Japan on public policy issues such as trade, defense, environment, education, medical care, and racial prejudice. [3] (INT)

ASIA 2605. Romancing the Nation in Modern Chinese LiteratureFrom the fourteenth century to the present. Fiction, drama, and poetry. Family relations and nation-state in romantic writings. Knowledge of Chi- nese is not required. [3] (HCA) 

ASIA 2606. Martial Tradition in Chinese Literature. From eleventh century BCE to modern period. War, banditry, revenge, cannibalism, fe- male knight-errant. All genres of literature, supplemented by visual mate- rial, theater, and film. Knowledge of Chinese is not required. [3] (HCA) 

ASIA 2607. Self and Society in Pre-modern Chinese LiteratureFrom the seventeenth-century BCE to the seventeenth-century CE. Po- etry, prose, fiction, and drama. Self, society, religion, gender, and print culture. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3891 section 01 offered fall 2015. Knowledge of Chinese is not required. [3] (HCA) 

ASIA 2608. Chinese Drama: 13th to 20th Centuries. Traditional and modern Chinese drama. Text, image, and performance. Gender, religious thinking, commerce, and censorship. Offered on a graded basis only. Knowledge of Chinese not required. [3] (HCA) 

ASIA 2609W. Writing and Gender in Traditional China. Pre-modern China: 1st century CE to 20th century CE. Women writers, women in fam- ily and society, gender relations, cross-dressing, and foot-binding. Poetry, prose, drama, fiction, and visual materials. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (HCA) 

ASIA 2630. Chinese Medicine. (Formerly HIST 282). [Formerly ASIA 230] Historical encounters and divergences between medicine in China and in the West. Chinese medical classics, including the Inner Canon of the Yellow Emperor and early herbal manuals. The creation of Traditional Chinese Medicine in the People’s Republic of China and the emergence of Chinese medicine as alternative medicine in the U.S. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed HIST 282 prior to fall 2012 or HIST 248 prior to fall 2008. [3] (P)

ASIA 3151. The Third World and Literature. [Formerly ASIA 251] The history of cultural and political concepts of the Third World from 1955 to the present. Contemporary literary and cultural debates regarding models of transnationalism and processes of globalization. National literatures and cultures foundational to the Third World model. The relationship between the genre of the novel and the formation of national communities. [3] (INT)

ASIA 3633. Self-Cultivation in Ancient China. [Formerly ASIA 233] 300 BCE to 500 CE. Methods, goals, and contexts of self-cultivation in antiquity. Breathing exercises, meditation, visualization, sexual arts, sacrifice, alchemy, and other practices in their religious, cultural, and social contexts. [3] (INT)

ASIA 3851. Independent Study. [Formerly ASIA 289a] Designed primarily for majors who want to study Asian topics not regularly offered in the curriculum. Must have consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit more than once, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. [1–3] (No AXLE credit)

ASIA 3852. Independent Study. [Formerly ASIA 289b] Designed primarily for majors who want to study Asian topics not regularly offered in the curriculum. Must have consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit more than once, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. [1–3] (No AXLE credit)

ASIA 3891. Special Topics. [Formerly ASIA 294a] Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1–3] (No AXLE credit)

ASIA 3892. Special Topics. [Formerly ASIA 294b] Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1–3] (No AXLE credit)

ASIA 3980. Junior Honors Readings. [Formerly ASIA 297] May be repeated for credit more than once. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] (No AXLE credit)

ASIA 4998. Honors Research. [Formerly ASIA 299a] Research conducted in consultation with a member of the faculty or affiliated faculty of the program. Open only to senior honors majors. [1–3] (No AXLE credit)

ASIA 4999. Honors Research. [Formerly ASIA 299b] Research conducted in consultation with a member of the faculty or affiliated faculty of the program. Open only to senior honors majors. Prerequisite: 4998. [1–3] (No AXLE credit)

  Chinese

CHIN 1011. Basic Chinese. [Formerly CHIN 200a] Designed exclusively for students with no previous exposure to the language. The basic pronunciation, grammar, and writing system of Mandarin Chinese. Simple conversation, the pinyin Romanization system, basic Chinese characters, and cultural elements embedded in the language. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1101 or a more advanced Chinese language course. [3] (No AXLE credit)

CHIN 1012. Basic Chinese. [Formerly CHIN 200b] Continuation of 1011. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1101 or a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 1011. [3] (No AXLE credit)

CHIN 1101. Elementary Chinese I. [Formerly CHIN 201] Introduction to Modern Chinese pronunciation, grammar, conversation, reading, and writing. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1012 or a more advanced Chinese language course. [5] (No AXLE credit)

CHIN 1102. Elementary Chinese II. [Formerly CHIN 202] Continuation of 1101. Introduction to Modern Chinese pronunciation, grammar, conversation, reading, and writing. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 1012 or 1101. [5] (INT)

CHIN 1231. Calligraphy. [Formerly CHIN 231] Basic skills of writing standard script kaishu. Basic aesthetic of Chinese calligraphy. No Chinese language background necessary. [1] (No AXLE credit)

CHIN 2201. Intermediate Chinese I. [Formerly CHIN 211] Oral and written language training. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. Repeat credit for students who completed 214. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 1102. [5] (INT)

CHIN 2202. Intermediate Chinese II. [Formerly CHIN 212] Continuation of 2201. Language training in oral and written Chinese. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. Serves as repeat credit for 216. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 2201. [5] (INT)

CHIN 2211. Chinese for Heritage Learners I. [Formerly CHIN 225] Intended for students who have some informal training in listening and speaking Mandarin Chinese. Basic literacy and other aspects of language proficiency. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. [3] (INT)

CHIN 2212. Chinese for Heritage Learners II. [Formerly CHIN 226] Continuation of 2211. Intended for students who have some informal training in listening and speaking Mandarin Chinese. Basic literacy and other aspects of language proficiency. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 2211. [3] (INT)

CHIN 3301. Advanced Chinese I. [Formerly CHIN 241] Readings in Chinese culture to enhance proficiency in oral and written Chinese. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 2202. [3] (INT)

CHIN 3302. Advanced Chinese II. [Formerly CHIN 242] Continuation of 3301. Readings in Chinese culture to enhance proficiency in oral and written Chinese. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 3301. [3] (INT)

CHIN 3302W. Advanced Chinese II. [Formerly CHIN 242W] Reading and writing essays about modern Chinese culture and society. Repeat credit for 3302. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Graded basis only. Prerequisite: 3301. [3] (INT)

CHIN 3851. Independent Study. [Formerly CHIN 289a] Designed primarily for majors who want to study Chinese not regularly offered in the curriculum. Must have consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits in 3851 and 3852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. [1–3; maximum 12 credits total for all semesters of CHIN 3851 and 3852] (No AXLE credit)

CHIN 3852. Independent Study. [Formerly CHIN 289b] Designed primarily for majors who want to study Chinese not regularly offered in the curriculum. Must have consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits in 3851 and 3852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. [1–3; maximum 12 credits total for all semesters of CHIN 3851 and 3852] (No AXLE credit)

CHIN 4401. Business Chinese I. [Formerly CHIN 255] Language skills for listening, speaking, reading, and writing in business environments. Modern China from economic and business perspectives. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 3302 or 3302W. [3] (INT)

CHIN 4402. Business Chinese II. [Formerly CHIN 256] Continuation of 4401. Language skills for listening, speaking, reading, and writing in business environments. Modern China from economic and business perspectives. Prerequisite: 4401. [3] (INT)

CHIN 4403. Readings in Modern Chinese Media. [Formerly CHIN 251] Books, newspapers, Internet, and television documents and productions pertaining to political, social, and economic issues in China, including foreign trade-related issues. Prerequisite: 3302. [3] (INT)

CHIN 4404. Readings in Modern Chinese Media. [Formerly CHIN 252] Continuation of 4403. Books, newspapers, and Internet sources pertaining to political, social, and cultural issues. Prerequisite: 3302. [3] (INT)

CHIN 4405. Classical Chinese Literature and Philosophy. [Formerly CHIN 253] Classical writings by Confucius, Sunzi, and Zhuangzi. Poems by Li Bai and Du Fu. Excerpts from The Dream of the Red Chamber. Linguistic comparisons between classical and modern Chinese. Prerequisite: 3302. [3] (INT)

CHIN 4406. Readings in Modern Literary Chinese. [Formerly CHIN 254] 1910 to the present. Chinese literature and poetry. Linguistic transformations that produced modern literary Chinese. Prerequisite: 3302. [3] (INT)

Hindi-Urdu

HNUR 1101. Elementary Hindi-Urdu I. Speaking-listening skills and basic grammar. Introduction to reading and writing in Devanagari (Hindi) and Nastaliq (Urdu) scripts and to South Asian cultural materials. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Hindi-Urdu language course. [5] (No AXLE credit)

HNUR 2201. Intermediate Hindi-Urdu I. Conversational skills, writing, vocabulary, and grammar. Reading texts in Devanagari (Hindi) and Nastaliq (Urdu) scripts. Discussion of cultural materials in Hindi-Urdu. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Hindi-Urdu language course. Prerequisite: 1102. [5] (INT)

Japanese

JAPN 1011. Basic Japanese I. [Formerly JAPN 200a] Simple conversation, writing system, and reading. Designed exclusively for students with little or no previous exposure to Japanese. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1101 or a more advanced Japanese language course. [3] (No AXLE credit)

JAPN 1012. Basic Japanese II. [Formerly JAPN 200b] No credit for students who have earned credit for 1101 or a more advanced Japanese language course. Prerequisite: 1011. [3] (No AXLE credit)

JAPN 1101. Elementary Japanese I. [Formerly JAPN 201] Acquisition of oral-aural skills and basic grammar. Introduction to reading and writing Japanese syllabaries and Chinese characters. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1012 or a more advanced Japanese language course. [5] (No AXLE credit)

JAPN 1102. Elementary Japanese II. [Formerly JAPN 202] Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. Prerequisite: 1012 or 1101. [5] (INT)

JAPN 2201. Intermediate Japanese I. [Formerly JAPN 211] Development of conversational skills and linguistic competence. Syntax, writing, and reading. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. Prerequisite: 1102. [5] (INT)

JAPN 2202. Intermediate Japanese II. [Formerly JAPN 212] Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. Prerequisite: 2201. [5] (INT)

JAPN 2232. Japanese through Manga. [Formerly JAPN 232] Reading and analysis of Japanese comic books. Language skills and knowledge of contemporary Japanese popular culture. Basic knowledge of hiragana and katakana required. [1] (No AXLE credit)

JAPN 3301. Advanced Japanese I. [Formerly JAPN 241] Reading and writing in contemporary Japanese texts. Conversation, discussion, and development of pragmatic competence. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. Prerequisite: 2202. [3] (INT)

JAPN 3302. Advanced Japanese II. [Formerly JAPN 242] No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. Prerequisite: 3301. [3] (INT)

JAPN 3851. Independent Study. [Formerly JAPN 289A] A reading course which may be repeated with variable content according to the needs of the individual student. Primarily designed to cover materials not otherwise available in the regular curriculum. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits in 3851 and 3852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. [1-3; maximum of 12 credits total for all semesters of JAPN 3851 and 3852] (No AXLE credit)

JAPN 3852. Independent Study. [Formerly JAPN 289B] A reading course which may be repeated with variable content according to the needs of the individual student. Primarily designed to cover materials not otherwise available in the regular curriculum. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits in 3851 and 3852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. [1–3; maximum of 12 credits total for all semesters of JAPN 3851 and 3852] (No AXLE credit)

JAPN 3891. Special Topics in Advanced Japanese. [Formerly JAPN 251] Reading, writing, and discussion in authentic Japanese cultural, literary, and historical texts. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. Prerequisite: 3302. [3] (INT)

Cinema & Media Arts

CMA 3892. Special Topics in the Study of Film: History of Postwar Japanese SciFi. Why is Japanese science fiction rife with images of a nation threatened by potential death from above? This course will investigate this question by examining the history of Japanese science fiction following World War II. The course will provide a survey of the genre beginning in the mid-twentieth century up to its contemporary articulations, organized around the critical link with the war. [3] (No AXLE credit)

English

ENGL 1260.07W. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis: Modern South Asian Literature in Translation  Analysis of a range of texts in social, political, and aesthetic contexts. Interdisciplinary study of cultural forms as diverse as poetry, advertisement, and film. [3] (HCA)

History

HIST 1050. East Asia since 1800. [Formerly HIST 105] Traditional orders in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Encroachment of European empires. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century social and political revolutions. Japanese imperialism and the invention of pan-Asianism. WWII in the Pacific; the rise and persistence of Communism. East Asia as a new center of the global economy in the twenty-first century. [3] (INT)

HIST 1060. Premodern China. [Formerly HIST 106] The development of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the seventeenth century. The birth and development of the Chinese identity; Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism; the moral, military, and bureaucratic foundations of the imperial institution; the Silk Road; eunuchs and concubines; the commercial revolution. [3] (INT)

HIST 1070. China from Empire to the People’s Republic. [Formerly HIST 107] From the seventeenth century to the present. The establishment and expansion of the Qing empire and its clashes with European empires. Twentieth-century revolutions and war with Japan. Mao and the making of the Communist state; post-Mao economic and social reforms. Tibet and ethnic minority issues. [3] (INT)

HIST 1080. Premodern Japan. [Formerly HIST 108] Japanese civilization from ancient times to the Meiji Restoration (1868). Connections between culture and politics; relations with neighboring regions in East Asia. [3] (INT)

HIST 1090. Modern Japan. [Formerly HIST 109] The political, social, economic, and cultural history of Japan in the nineteenth century to the present. Radical changes in the state, society, and economy and the effects of these changes on Japan’s place in the world. [3] (INT)

HIST 1160. Modern South Asia. [Formerly HIST 116] Early modern South Asia to British imperialism and the independence of India and Pakistan. Colonial society, political movements, caste, gender, and religious “reform.” Mass nationalism and Gandhi, religious conflict, and the partition of India and Pakistan. Debates on history and memory. [3] (INT)

HIST 1881. The Body in Modern Japanese Culture. [Formerly HIST 188a] The roles of human bodies and body image in the making of modern Japan. Bodies as a means of understanding the past and the present. Individuals, society, culture, and physical environment. Historical and literary writings and film from the twentieth century. [3] (INT)

HIST 1882W. Japan Through Historical Fiction. Premodern and mod- ern history of Japan through works of Japanese historical fiction. Culture, religion, and society. Relationship between history and literature. [3] (INT) 

HIST 2100. Politics and Catastrophe in Modern China. [Formerly HIST 202] Influence of politics on culture, society, government, and the military. The Cultural Revolution to Tiananmen Square. [3] (INT) 

HIST 2105. Chinese Thought. [Formerly HIST 203] Confucianism and Philosophical Daoism. The Confucian Four Books, the Daodejing (Laozi), Zhuangzi, and Neo-Confucianism. [3] (INT)

HIST 2110. Crisis Simulation in East Asia. [Formerly HIST 204] Strategic motivations and behaviors of international actors. Simulations of the decision-making process during critical historical moments in the East Asian context through role-playing and video games. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (INT)

HIST 2111. U.S.–Asia Relations. Eighteenth and Nineteenth century European empires in Asia and the Americas to present age of globalization. Trade and culture; migration and social contacts; sports and medicine; diplomacy and war. Focus on U.S. and East Asia. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who have earned credit for HIST 294 01 spring 2015. [3] (P)

HIST 2115. Play and Pleasure in Early Modern Japan. [Formerly HIST 205] Cultural history of Tokugawa Japan (1603–1868), with emphasis on daily life and popular entertainment in the capital of the warrior government, Edo (present-day Tokyo). Woodblock prints, pleasure quarters, kabuki theatre, commoner carnivals, and popular literature. [3] (INT)

HIST 2119. The Pacific War in Cinematic Memory. Cinematic representations of the Pacific Theater in World War II. Formal and historical analyses. Film’s role in shaping war memories. [3] (INT)

HIST 2120. Japan’s War and Postwar, 1931-1989. [Formerly HIST 206] Japan’s war in Asia and the Pacific in the mid-twentieth century and its legacies. The effect of defeat on the nation; reconstruction efforts and economic success. Hirohito’s death. [3] (INT) 

HIST 2140. The Mughal World. [Formerly HIST 211a] Mughal history from 1500–1750. The early modern world and Islamic empires. Akbar and Hindu-Muslim interactions in South Asia. Oriental despotism and the idea of the monarch. Gender and authority. English, Dutch, and Portuguese views. Trade and the decline of Mughal authority. Globalization, the rise of Indian entrepreneurs, and the East India company. [3] (INT)

HIST 2145. Religion and Politics in South Asia. [Formerly HIST 211B] From pre-modern times to the present. The formation of religious identities in South Asia, including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Religious and political identity during British colonialism. Post-1947 South Asian politics and debates on religious freedom and conflict. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (INT) 

HIST 2150. India and the Indian Ocean. [Formerly HIST 212a] Cultures along the Indian Ocean coastline from Roman times to 1800, especially South Asia. Coastal societies and politics, Islam, pilgrimage and trade, economic zones, and cultural ties. Pirates, seafarers and merchants; diasporas and genealogies. The entry of European trading companies and debates on trade and empire. [3] (INT)

HIST 3090. Tokyo: History and Image. [Formerly HIST 286c] Tokyo and its representation in various media from the mid-nineteenth century to the present and imaginings of the future. The city’s physical development and image in photographs, films, novels, essays, and other textual and visual materials produced within Japan and beyond. [3] (INT) 

HIST 3110. Christianity in China. [Formerly HIST 286e] Encounters between Western missionaries and Chinese society. Growth of an indigenous church. Translation of the Bible into Chinese. Debates about papa authority. Anti-Christian movements. Relationship between Christianity and Communism in China today. [3] (INT)

HIST 3220W. Images of India. [Formerly HIST 288d] Images in and of South Asia as studied through maps, religious imagery, print culture, cinema, and architecture. The politics of visual stereotypes of India. The visual history of Orientalism, modernity, gender, and religion in South Asia. [3] (INT)

  History of Art

HART 1111. First-Year Writing Seminar. [Formerly HART 115F] Independent learning and inquiry in an environment in which students can express knowledge and defend opinions through intensive class discussion, oral presentations, and written expression. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication of topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits in any 1111 course per semester of enrollment. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

HART 1200. Arts of East Asia. [Formerly HART 120] A survey of sculpture, painting, and architecture in China, Japan, and Korea. Historical, religious, philosophical, and cultural background. [3] (INT)

HART 1205. Arts of South and Southeast Asia. [Formerly HART 125] Second millennium BCE to present. Formation of political and social identi- ties as reflected in artistic productions. Development of artistic traditions in response to cultural exchange and political dynamics. [3] (INT) 

HART 1220. History of Asian Architecture. [Formerly HART 122] Cultural traditions of Asia from the first millennium BCE to the nineteenth century through the study of architecture. Cities, temples, and domestic structures of China, Japan, Korea, South Asia (India and Pakistan), and Southeast Asia. [3] (INT)

HART 2110. Arts of China. [Formerly HART 252] Artistic production from the Neolithic period through the Qing dynasty in relation to religious and cultural contexts. [3] (HCA)

HART 2130. Arts of Japan. [Formerly HART 253] Artistic production from the Neolithic through Meiji periods in relation to religious and cultural contexts. [3] (HCA)

HART 2150. East Asian Architecture and Gardens. [Formerly HART 251] East Asian religious, vernacular, and garden architecture from the second century CE to the present. Influence of Buddhism on East Asian architecture, fengshui, and site selection, garden as religious landscape, Asia in modern architecture. [3] (HCA)

HART 2170. Religion and Politics in South and Southeast Asian Art. [Formerly HART 246] Use of Buddhist, Hindu, and Jain images as political communication in South and Southeast Asia from the time of Buddha (480–400 BC) to the present. The original patronage of temples and religious icons, and their reappropriation in ancient and modern times. [3] (INT)

HART 2175. Modern and Contemporary Indian Architecture. From nineteenth-century British colonial rule to the present. Built environment of Indian subcontinent in local and global contexts. Eighteenth-century Jaipur and urban planning, the British Raj, Calcutta, Allahabad, and Edwin Lutyens’ New Delhi. Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, the Neo-Gothic of Bom- bay, and contemporary architecture. [3] (INT) 

HART 3112. The Arts of China during the Liao-Song Period. [Formerly HART 249] Art and architecture of China during the Liao-Song period from C.E. 907 to C.E. 1279. Political, religious, and aesthetic contexts. Influence of coastal trade and pilgrimage in transformations of painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture. [3] (INT)

HART 3140. Healing and Art in East Asia. Influence of early healing practices on the development of the arts of East Asia. Magical healing texts, talismans, and tattoos; diagramming the body and the landscape; and the art of the Buddha of Medicine. Gardens and growing transformative herbs. Tea as medicine and art. No credit for students who have earned credit for HONS 1820W-28. [3] (HCA) 

HART 3164W. Art of Buddhist Relic and Reliquary. [Formerly HART 245W] From second century BCE to present. Relic veneration and construction of reliquaries from a visual perspective. Beautification, ritualization, use and abuse, and bodily issues spanning India, China, Korea, Japan, and Southeast Asia. [3] (INT)

HART 3172. Himalayan Art: Art of the Divine Abode. [Formerly HART 247] Art of Nepal and Tibet from its inception to the present. Religious and cultural contexts. Initial western responses; Hindu and Buddhist art and architecture in Nepal; Tibetan Buddhist Art; artistic productions in the Tibetan diaspora; and souvenir art in Nepal. [3] (INT)

HART 3174. The South Asian Temple. [Formerly HART 248] From its inception to the present. Morphological and stylistic analysis. Anthropo- logical and ethnographical approach to temples as living communal enti- ties. [3] (INT) 

  Human and Organizational Development

HODI 3260. Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Development, Reform, and Innovation. [Formerly HOD 2445] This course focuses on an in-depth analysis of current developments in education and schooling in the vast and diverse Asia-Pacific Region. Students will examine perspectives from educational researchers, policy makers and practitioners on the major issues, concerns and prospects regarding educational developments in the region. [3]

  Medicine, Health, and Society

MHS 2310. Chinese Society and Medicine. [Formerly MHS 231] Medicine and health in contemporary China. Social organization of medical care, social determinants of health and disease, social construction of health and disease, and health-related social problems. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 290 section 3 in fall 2010 and section 1 in fall 2011. [3] (SBS)

  Political Science

PSCI 2216. The Chinese Political System. [Formerly PSCI 216] Governmental institutions and political processes in the People’s Republic of China with emphasis upon the interaction of traditional and revolutionary elements. Some attention to Taiwan since 1950 and to the overseas Chinese as parts of the Chinese political universe. Prerequisite or corequisite: 1100, 1101, 1102, 1103, or 1150. [3] (INT)

PSCI 3894. Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Development in South Asia. Introduces students to political and economic development in South Asia, a region that is home to a quarter of the world's population, and nearly half of its poor. We read foundational perspectives on development, and analyze them through the concrete experiences of countries in South Asia. Key questions we examine include: Does democracy aid or hinder development? Does economic growth increase social inequality? Should the state or the market should play a primary role in developing economies? What is the impact of urbanization and migration on economic development? Course materials will include scholarly analyses, fiction and nonfiction, and film. [3] (No AXLE credit)

  Religious Studies

RLST 1111. First-Year Writing Seminar. [Formerly RLST 115F] Independent learning and inquiry in an environment in which students can express knowledge and defend opinions through intensive class discussion, oral presentations, and written expression. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication of topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits in any 1111 course per semester of enrollment. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

RLST 1500. Introduction to Islam. [Formerly RLST 113] An historical overview of the different religious traditions in Islam, their basis in the Qur’an and life of the Prophet, their proliferation in the medieval period, and their response to the challenge of modernity. Topics include sunni and shi’i Islam, evolution of law and theology, sufism and political philosophy. Islam in Africa, India, Spain, and southeast Asia as well as the Middle East. [3] (HCA)

RLST 1637. Religions of Tibet and the Himalaya. [Formerly RLST 137] Sixth century CE to the present. Religious ideas and practices. Myth, cosmology, doctrine, pilgrimage, and ritual. Adaptation of religious tradition to changing historical and cultural contexts. Encounters among Tibetan Buddhism, Bön, Catholicism, and modernity. [3] (INT)

RLST 1700. Religions in China. [Formerly RLST 135] Major religious traditions of China. Taoism, Buddhism, Confucianism, state-sponsored religious systems, and popular religion. Thought and practice from ancient times to the present. [3] (INT)

RLST 1710. Religions of Japan. [Formerly RLST 136] Early myths to present-day practices. Buddhism, Shinto, Shugendo, Christianity, and new religious movements. Cosmology, ritual, death, and modernity. Thematic explorations through film. [3] (INT)

RLST 2644. Buddhist Traditions. [Formerly RLST 244] Historical and thematic survey of foundational, Mahayana, and esoteric Buddhist traditions. Mythology, doctrine, meditation, devotional practices, and institutions of early and medieval South Asia. Contemporary case studies from Asia and North America. [3] (INT)

RLST 2664. Foundations of Hindu Traditions. [Formerly RLST 264] Hindu cosmology and the ritual structure of sacrifice. The effect of the law of cause and effect (karma) on the moral order of the universe (dharma). The emergence of bhakti devotion to key gods and goddesses. The escape from the cycle of lives through yoga, introspection, and devotion. Pilgrimage mapping and the sacred geography of ancient and modern India. Classical mythology of the Vedas, Epics, and Puranas. [3] (INT)

RLST 3561. Islam in South Asia. History of Islam in South Asia. Cultural memory of conquest. Inter-religious interactions. Sufism and Bhakti. Mughal traditions of cosmopolitanism. Legacy of colonialism. Impact of Partition. Shared popular culture and shared sacred spaces. [3] (INT)

RLST 3650. Classical Philosophies of India. [Formerly RLST 250] Hindu and Buddhist traditions. The six “mainstream” schools (darsana) of Hindu thought and their interaction with Buddhist philosophy in ancient India. [3] (INT)

RLST 3669. Sacred Space in the Tibetan World. [Formerly RLST 269] Creation, mediation, and reproduction of sacred space from artifacts to built structures to geographies. Narrative, ritual, and cosmological aspects of Tibetan Buddhist, Bön, and local religious traditions. Cases include premodern to modern periods, and local to global contexts. [3] (INT)

RLST 3670W. Buddhism and the State. [Formerly RLST 270W] Models relating Buddhism and the state in ancient and modern Asia. Kingship and spiritual leadership; sacred territory and national identity; legitimation theory and its alternatives; and religious responses to the modern state. Case studies from India, Nepal, Thailand, Burma, Tibet, Mongolia, China, and Japan. [3] (INT)

RLST 3747. Daoist Tradition. [Formerly RLST 247] Historical and thematic survey of the Daoist tradition in China. Philosophical classics and religious scriptures, as well as social history are covered. Daoism today. [3] (HCA)

RLST 3749. Zen Buddhism. [Formerly RLST 249] A study of the development of Zen Buddhism in China and Japan with special attention to its basic philosophy, its position within Mahayana Buddhism, its meditational techniques, and its contemporary significance. [3] (INT)

RLST 3753. East Asian Buddhism. [Formerly RLST 253] East Asian Buddhist texts. Key Buddhist ideas, values, practices, and institutions. Chronological surveys of key developments in major historical periods. [3] (INT)

RLST 3775. Chinese Religions through Stories. [Formerly RLST 275] Analysis of narratives from various religious traditions and genres within early and medieval China. The role of narrative in Chinese religious, cultural, and political life. Primary texts in English translation. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (INT)

RLST 4665. Mythologies and Epics of South Asia. [Formerly RLST 265] Classical Hindu and Buddhist mythologies of South Asia. Sanskrit Mahabharata and Ramayana epics. Regional adaptations of mythical themes in vernacular languages. Buddhist and Islamic narratives of romance and chronicle. Interpretive and performance strategies. Oral, literary, and visual modes of representation. Political deployment of myths. [3] (INT)

RLST 4666. Devotional Traditions of South Asia: Hindu, Muslim, Sikh. [Formerly RLST 266] Mythology of Hindu pantheon and worship through devotion or bhakti. Techniques for inculcating devotion through meditation, temple rituals, and pilgrimage. Entry of Islam into South Asia. Shi’I and Sufi practices. Sikh traditions. Role of vernacular languages in creating local traditions. Hindu-Muslim interaction, syncretism, and shared sacred space. Challenges to orthodoxy. [3] (INT)

RLST 4774. Japanese Mythology. [Formerly RLST 274] Antiquity to the present. Classic myths and re-tellings over time. Introduction to theoretical frameworks including comparative and historical. Politics, gender, and performance. [3] (INT)