Skip to Content

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Home > Undergraduate Program > Undergraduate Program Courses

Undergraduate Program Courses

ugrad


For the Undergraduate School Catalog please follow this link:

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/catalogs/undergrad/UGAD.pdf

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE – FALL 2014

SPANISH

SPAN 206: Spanish for Business and Economics (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

01 MWF 12:10-1:00

02 MWF 11:10-12:00

Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu

This course provides a thorough foundation in business vocabulary and an overview of business and cultural concepts, emphasizing international business communications skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Focusing on the role of the international manager, the course emphasizes vocabulary related to corporate organization and structure, finance, banking and accounting processes, capital investment, human resources, the production of goods and services, marketing, financial management, and international operations articulated within the geographic and cultural context of the Spanish-speaking world and its place in the global economy. Students are evaluated through essays, tests, oral presentations, final project, and final exam.

SPAN 207: Advanced Conversation (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

01 MWF 2:10-3:00

02 MWF 11:10-12:00

This class is an advanced conversation class that will offer an intra-cultural approach contrasting Spanish, Spanish American and US perspectives. This is a content-based course that focuses primarily on the development of advanced oral language skills. The class format will consist of class discussions, debates, oral presentations, interviews and electronic discussions on contemporary issues. This class is designed for students with a high level of proficiency, especially those returning from a study abroad program. Some of the issues covered in this class will be gender relations, cultural identity, social relations, value systems, religion and education. This class is closed to native speakers.

SPAN 208: Advanced Conversation through Cultural Issues in Film (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

MWF 12:10-1:00

Elena.O.Segovia@Vanderbilt.edu

Advanced conversation course using fifteen films in Spanish, from eight areas of the Spanish-speaking world, as the basis for discussion of linguistic, historic, cultural, and social issues.

This course is not recommended for students coming directly from Spanish 202 or Spanish 203. It is intended for students with a high level of aural/oral proficiency, especially those returning from study abroad. It is not open to students of Hispanic descent/native speakers of Spanish.

All fifteen movies have no subtitles. Students typically need to watch each movie at least twice. Final grade will be based on intense class participation, fifteen critical reviews, two exams, and two portfolio presentations.

SPAN 211: Spanish for the Medical Profession *Service Learning Course (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

MWF 10:10-11:00

Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu

Service-learning based, this advanced conversation course incorporates extensive medical terminology, public policy and cultural competency issues related to health care and the Latino population in the United States. Students are evaluated through essays, tests, oral presentations, service work, and final exam. Prerequisite: 201W and 202; closed to native speakers of Spanish.

SPAN 214: Dialectology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

TR 1:10-2:25

Phillip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu

This course will examine the formation, general characteristics and distinctive features, as well as the geographical extension, of the principal dialectal regions of Spain and Spanish America. Both historical and modern dialects will be considered. Emphasis will be given to phonological variation and to the study of non-standard linguistic features, which will be analyzed vis-à-vis those of modern standard Spanish (Castilian).

SPAN 216: Phonology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

TR 9:35-10:50

Philip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu

Spanish Phonology consists of the study of phonological theory, as well as the practical application of its principles, as applied to the Spanish language. The primary goal of the course is to enable students to improve their pronunciation of Spanish through an analysis of the nature and the production of Spanish sounds and of pronunciation problems frequently experienced by non-native speakers.  The course will provide a general understanding of the nature of human language, how speech sounds are produced and function discretely as a component of a linguistic system, and how the sounds of Spanish differ in nature and in distribution from those of English and other languages.  Also considered are pronunciation problems due to spelling differences.  Both standard and dialectal pronunciations of Spanish will be analyzed.

SPAN 216: Phonology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS) MWF 2:10-3:00 Cynthia.Wasick@vanderbilt.edu Spanish Phonology consists of the study of phonological theory, as well as the practical application of its principles, as applied to the Spanish language. The primary goal of the course is to enable students to improve their pronunciation of Spanish through an analysis of the nature and the production of Spanish sounds and of pronunciation problems frequently experienced by non-native speakers. The course will provide a general understanding of the nature of human language, how speech sounds are produced and function discretely as a component of a linguistic system, and how the sounds of Spanish differ in nature and in distribution from those of English and other languages. Also considered are pronunciation problems due to spelling differences. Both standard and dialectal pronunciations of Spanish will be analyzed. Students will make six recordings based upon an assigned text in order to analyze and perfect Spanish pronunciation skills. There will be three quizzes and two exams.

Preparación, participación activa y tareas....................................12%

6 Grabaciones (6 x 3%)...................................................18%

3 Pruebas (3 x 10%).....................................................30%

2 Exámenes (Mid-term 20% y Final ....................................40%

Classpak (Required: Must be purchased by the second class meeting): Dalbor, John B. Spanish Pronunciation: Theory and Practice, 3rd edition. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1997.

SPAN 217: Contrastive Analysis of Spanish and English (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

MWF 1:10-2:00

Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu

This course proposes to be a comparative analysis of the phonological, morphological, lexical, semantic and syntactical structures of Spanish and English. We will study the similarities and differences between the linguistic systems of these two languages and try to identify and explain the possible origin of different types of errors common to English-speaking students who study Spanish as a Second Language. We will analyze both oral and written English and Spanish. There will be assigned homework and readings as well as graded individual, pair and group assignments. In addition, there will be three exams. Some readings and course materials located on OAK.

SPAN 220: Languages of Spain (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

MWF 11:10-12:00

Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu

This course will give students a brief overview of the formation of the Spanish languages of the Iberian Peninsula and their development into the modern languages of Castilian, Catalan, and Galician. In addition, we will briefly explore the non-Indo-European language of Basque. We will analyze each respective language by focusing on the differences in the lexical, phonological, and morphosyntactic features and systems. We will discuss issues related to bilingualism, biculturalism and the debate between linguistic theory, actual linguistic reality and the legislation and imposition of official linguistic policy by government and language academies. There will be four quizzes, one group presentation of a linguistic study, one 3 page reflection paper based upon the linguistic study and one final take home exam.

Preparation, active participation and assignments..................15%

4 quizzes (4 x 10%)...............................................................40%

1 group presentation and personal reflection paper (1 x 20%)....20%

1 Final Exam – Take Home (1 x 25%)......................................25%

Readings and course materials located on OAK.

SPAN 221: Spanish Civilization (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

TR 1:10-2:25

Maria.P.Pintane@vanderbilt.edu

An examination of the development of Spanish culture from its origins to the present day in the context of Western civilization. Discussion of the historical background, literary and artistic trends as well as the political and socioeconomic patterns. Not open to students who have attended Vanderbilt in Spain or other abroad programs in Spain.

SPAN 230: Development of Lyric Poetry (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

MWF 1:10-2:00

Victoria.Gardner@Vanderbilt.edu

Popular and traditional forms; the sonnet and other Renaissance and Baroque classical forms; Romanticism.

SPAN 231 The Origins of Spanish Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

TR 2:35-3:50

Victoria.A.Burrus@Vanderbilt.edu

This course covers the medieval period in Spanish literature and examines texts dating from the 12th to the 15th century. Works are placed in their socio-historical context. Three masterworks form the bulk of the reading: the Poema del Cid, the Libro de buen amor (Juan Ruiz) and Celestina (Fernando de Rojas). Other works covered include selections from the Milagros de Nuestra Señora (Gonzalo de Berceo), El Conde Lucanor (Don Juan Manuel), and a variety of 15th-century poetry. Weekly mini-análisis based on the readings are required and, with class discussion, form a major part of the grade.

SPAN 232 Literature of the Spanish Golden Age (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

MWF 12:10-1:00

Heraldo.Falconi@Vanderbilt.edu

This course will survey prose, poetry and drama from early modern Spain. Some of the topics discussed in class will be history and politics, the emergence of popular culture, the continued rise of city life, the definition of religious and secular spheres, and the nature and limits of royal authority in the age of empire. Final grade will be based on class participation, regular reports, exams and papers.

SPAN 233: Spanish Literature from the Enlightenment to 1900 (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

TR 11:00-12:15

Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu

The aim of the course is to survey the history of Spanish literature from 1700 to 1900. In order to illustrate its evolution and its different genres we will read the plays El sí de las niñas by Moratín and Don Alvaro o la fuerza del sino by Angel de Saavedra, Duque de Rivas, the novel Los Pazos de Ulloa by Emilia Pardo Bazán, a two-volume anthology of poetry, and selections of other kinds of texts such as historical accounts, essays, letters, newspaper articles, etc. We will also see two movies, one about Goya in class, and an adaptation of a Realist novel outside of class. Fragments of other movies, musical works and fine arts slides and reproductions will be used also throughout the semester to complement the study of the literary texts. Classes will be taught in Spanish. Each student will give one oral presentation and a write a six-page final paper, both in Spanish.

SPAN 235: Spanish American Literature from the Conquest to 1900 (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

MWF 1:10-2:00

Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@Vanderbilt.edu

Introduction to the main literary trends transplanted to the Indies and their interaction with the Indian legacy in texts by Spanish, creole, mestizo and Indian writers. Readings will cover multiple genres, and these pieces will be linked to the cultural contexts from which they arose. Readings from Columbus, Ercilla, Balbuena, Bernal Díaz, Inca Garcilaso, Balbuena, and Sor Juana, among others.

A selection of texts and images will be available to the students.

Weekly responses (40%)

Oral Presentation (5 %)

Mid term essay (15%)

Final essay (15 %)

Attendance and Participation (25%)

SPAN 246: Don Quixote (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

TR 1:10-2:25

Edward.H.Friedman@Vanderbilt.edu

The course includes a close reading of Cervantes's Don Quijote, the most famous novel written in Spanish and one of the classic novels of all times. We will study the complete text of Don Quijote, published in two parts, in 1605 and 1615, in addition to a selection of critical studies that reflect multiple approaches to the novel. Students will write a number of short papers and abstracts, and there will be two tests. The course will be given in Spanish.

Texts:

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote (Lathrop ed.)

Don Quijote Dictionary (Lathrop)

Carroll B. Johnson, Don Quixote: The Quest for Modern Fiction

+ selected critical studies and Woody Allen film The Purple Rose of Cairo

Evaluation will be based on class participation and the written exercises (50%) and on the two tests (50%). The course requires that students read the assigned materials prior to class meetings, so that they may contribute to class discussions. It should be understood that the course will involve a significant amount of work, but, if all goes according to plan, the benefits of that work ‒ exploration of new ("novel") ideas and enjoyment ‒ will make the effort worthwhile.

SPAN 275: Latina and Latin American Women Writers (Major: Literature; AXLE: P)

TR 9:35-10:50

Benigno.Trigo@Vanderbilt.edu

This course aims to be an introduction to contemporary women writing in Latin America and to the recent writing of Latinas in the United States. It will focus on their complex representation of sexuality and the maternal body. We will study how these authors trouble writing, and will interrogate their association of writing with the maternal experience.

SPAN 294-01: Special Topics in Hispanic Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: none)

Topic: Celebration and Play in Latin American Literature

MWF 12:10-1:00

Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@vanderbilt.edu

A comparative analysis of the celebration phenomenon as a tool to evaluate the integration of those elements that constitute the identity of three Latin American regions: Mexico, the Andean region and the Caribbean. Colonial and contemporary texts, paintings and film will be the basis for class and theoretical discussion. Readings in the works of Octavio Paz, Elena Garro, José María Arguedas, Guillermo Cabrera Infante and José Lezama Lima, among others. Students will be required to write three analytical essays (60%), to actively engage in class participation (30%), and to take four pop up quizzes (10%).

SPAN 294-02: Special Topics in Hispanic Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: none)

Topic: Politics of Identity in Latino U.S. Literature

TR 11:00-12:15

William.Luis@Vanderbilt.edu

Latinos, people of Hispanic descent who were born or raised in the United States, are the fastest growing population in the United States. However, the Latino presence is not new and can be traced to the first part of the nineteenth century, for Latinos are indeed an integral part of U.S. history and culture. Latino literature is at the vanguard of a new discipline, one that erases differences between borders, cultures, and languages. Latino writers negotiate their identities as they move from one culture to the other and back again. Among Latino writers, Latinas are at the forefront of this movement. In this class we will focus on the writings of Latinas/Latinos from the four largest groups: Chicanos, Cuban-Americans, Puerto Rican-Americans, and Dominican Americans. We will look at the works of writers such as Cristina Garcia and Oscar Hijuelos (Cuban Americans), Julia Álvarez and Junot Díaz (Dominican Americans), Gloria Anzaldúa and Corky González (Chicanos), and Judith Ortiz Cofer and Piri Thomas (Puerto Rican Americans), and explore how they read the experiences of their parents' country of origin and that of their adopted homeland, and produce a synthesis of the two.

SPAN 296: Special Topics in Hispanic Culture (Major: Elective; AXLE: none)

Topic: Fictions of Race

MWF 11:10-12:00

Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu

The course begins with a brief survey of the race concept in various disciplines and then turns to the representations and uses of race in selected plays, novels, and short stories from Latin America and the U.S., including: Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; Felipe Pardo y Figueroa, Una huérfana en Chorrillos; Enrique López Albújar, Matalaché; Jorge Amado, Jubiabá; Manuel Scorza, Redoble por Rancas; Gayl Jones, Corregidora; Luis Rafael Sánchez, La Pasión según Antígona Pérez; Toni Morrison, A Mercy. Discussion, midterm, pop quizzes, and final paper all in Spanish or Portuguese.

PORTUGUESE

Spanish Majors may take Portuguese 102 (a beginning course designed for Spanish speakers, offered every semester) as an elective in the Spanish major (but not the minor).

PORT 102: Intensive Elementary Portuguese (Elective in Spanish Major; AXLE: INT)

01 MTRF 11:10-12:00

02 MTRF 12:10-1:00

An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor. NOTE: May be counted as 3 hours of elective toward the Spanish major. [4 hours]

PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese (AXLE: INT)

MWF 11:10-12:00

Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu

Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 100B, 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language. The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc).

PORT 203: Brazilian Pop Culture (AXLE: INT)

MWF 1:10-2:00

Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu

Portuguese through Pop Culture is a content-based course with emphasis on Brazilian Pop Culture as a tool for acquiring advanced vocabulary, training conversational skills, and developing writing proficiency. This course seeks to explore various aspects of Brazilian culture while practicing advanced level grammar topics, discussing the readings, and engaging in the process of writing.

PORT 232: Brazilian Literature through the Nineteenth Century

TR 11:00-12:15

Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu

Main literary trends, principal writers and works of Brazilian literature, from colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Study of the works of Gregório de Matos, Antônio Vieira, Gonçalves Dias, Alencar, Machado de Assis, and João da Cruz e Sousa.

PORT 295: Special Topics in Portuguese and Brazilian Literature or Civilization in English Translation. (AXLE: none) (Does NOT count for Port minor or SpanPort major.)

Topic: Contemporary Brazilian Fiction

TR 2:35-3:50

Emanuelle.Oliveira@Vanderbilt.edu

Steady economic growth and important social programs (such as the Bolsa Família, an Income Transference Program) have raised millions of people from poverty in Brazil, creating a new middle class. This group has expanded the market for cultural goods, directly impacting the publishers' marketplace. This new readership caused an increase in the numbers of publications, as well as the emergence of a new generation of authors. In this course, we will read texts in English translation from this very recent generation of writers, focusing on questions of national identity, race, class, ethnicity, and globalization, just to name a few. Course taught in English; no knowledge of Portuguese necessary.

Senior Majors may, with permission of the instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies, take a graduate level course. Registration must be handled separately through the Graduate School.

SPAN 301: Literary Analysis and Theory (Also listed as Portuguese 301)

F 1:10-3:30

Christina.Karageorgou@Vanderbilt.edu

The purpose of this course is to provide some of the principles and basic knowledge that may become departing points for critical approaches to literary texts. The knowledge of literary theory requires a fundamental discernment from criticism and history, namely from using a set of applicable tools, instrumental knowledge, and/or historical views on literature in order to interpret a text. Literary theory precedes any analysis and is the basis for all critical readings. Whether consciously or not, every interpretive reading presupposes a set of principles, the demarcation of a departing space, the perspective from which critical discourse is emitted. This semester, Literary Theory and Analysis aims at providing the starting point for a personal trajectory of discovery, this of a partial yet not for this less solid knowledge of the kind of problems addressed over time by literary theorists and trends of thought. No course or series of courses could cover the entire field of literary theory. Such a conviction drives me to offer a selected series of texts that show approaches to the definition of the literary in terms of aesthetics, a topic which I consider a cornerstone for any approach to literature. What has been thought of as literature, and what is the relation of the corpus of literary texts with the field of aesthetics? These are the two fundamental questions answered by the series of texts chosen in this course.

SPAN 310: Foreign Language Learning and Teaching (Also listed as Portuguese 310)

M 3:10-5:40

Virginia.M.Scott@Vanderbilt.edu

Principles and practices of teaching a second language, with concentration on recent interactive and communicative models of foreign language instruction. Goals of the course are 1) to introduce principles of Second Language Acquisition and learning, 2) to critically read relevant literature in the area(s), and 3) to develop FL instructor's awareness through reflective and critical thinking. Classroom observations, journal writing, development of materials, and a small action research project are expected. Required of all entering teaching assistants.

SPAN 344: The Baroque

T 3:10-5:30

Edward.H.Friedman@Vanderbilt.edu

The course will offer a survey of baroque literature and culture in Spain. The selections will include narrative, dramatic, and poetic texts, as well as critical studies. We will discuss the use of the term baroque: its origins, manifestations, and polemics regarding baroque style. We will consider the distinctions between culteranismo and conceptismo; contrasts among the categories of Renaissance, mannerist, and baroque art; the baroque in Europe at large; and the neobaroque. Students will write short response papers, contribute to class dialogue, and develop a seminar paper on a Spanish baroque work.

The primary texts will include

Lazarillo de Tormes

Francisco de Quevedo, La vida del buscón

Miguel de Cervantes, La fuerza de la sangre, La española inglesa

María de Zayas, La inocencia castigada, El jardín engañoso

Tirso de Molina, El vergonzoso en palacio

Pedro Calderón de la Barca, La dama duende

Elias L. Rivers, ed., Renaissance and Baroque Poetry of Spain (selections by Juan Boscán, Garcilaso de la Vega, Lope de Vega, Luis de Góngora, Francisco de Quevedo, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz)

+ selected critical studies

Evaluation will be based on written exercises and participation (70%) and the seminar paper (30%).

SPAN 351: Comparative Methodology (Also listed as PORT 351)

TR 1:10-2:25

Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu

Comparative Methodology deals with basic methodological questions: What is Comparative Literature and how does one define it? How are Spanish and Portuguese reinvigorating the discipline? How and why is the combined Ph.D. program in Spanish and Portuguese an inherently comparative program? What possibilities does it offer? How does it prepare someone for connecting Latin American literature to inter-American literary study? What constitutes a successful comparative paper or essay? What elements must it have? What are the problems that a comparative study must avoid or resolve if it is to be successful? The course emphasizes connecting one's particular interests to the possibilities presented by the comparative method. In addition to regular presentations, a final, formal oral presentation is required as is a final comparative research paper.

SPAN 362: Realist Novel of the Nineteenth Century

R 3:10-5:30 Furman

Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu

The seminar will explore the Spanish realist novel through the reading of four primary texts: La Regenta by Leopoldo Alas "Clarín," Fortunata y Jacinta by Benito Pérez Galdós, Los Pazos de Ulloa by Emilia Pardo Bazán and Insolación by the same author. We will also read a selection of documents on the poetics of the realist novel and a set of articles about recent developments in the criticism of the primary texts read and of the period as a whole. Some of the topics to be discussed will be: the problematic of representation, the obsession with the fabrication of people, the politics of gender and sex, the relation of the novel with other art forms and media, the historical conditions of existence of the realist novel, and the social function of literature, its actual or intended performative value.

SPAN 375: Seminar: Studies in Trans-Atlantic Literature and Culture.

Topic: Transatlantic Enlightenment

W 3:10-5:30

Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu

Rigorously interdisciplinary, this survey is an introduction to the major trends and authors of the Hispanic 18th century on both sides of the Atlantic. Readings include novels by the Mexican journalist and novelist J.J. Fernández de Lizardi, La Quijotita y su prima o la educación de las mujeres, and the Portuguese poet and novelist Francisco Botelho de Moraes, Historia de las cuevas de Salamanca. Poetry will also be surveyed, including canti from epics by Francisco Ruiz de León, La Hernandía, and Pedro de Peralta Barnuevo, Lima fundada o la Conquista del Perú. Prose-readings will include selections from: Ignacio de Luzán, Poética; Padre Benito Feijoo y Montenegro, Teatro crítico and Cartas eruditas; newspapers and literary journals such as Mercurio Peruano, Gaceta de México, Gaceta de Madrid, Diario de los literatos de España; Joaquín Antonio de Basarás, Origen, costumbres y estado presente de mexicanos y filipinos Pedro Rodríguez Campomanes, Discurso sobre la educación popular and Discurso sobre el fomento de la industria; Antonio de Ulloa, Noticias americanas o Entretenimientos fisico-históricos sobre la América meridional y la septentrional oriental; Mario Cicala, Descripción de la Real Audiencia de Quito; Pedro Murillo Velarde, Geografía de México y de las Filipinas and Curso de derecho canónico hispano indiano; Urrutia y Montoya, Teatro historico, jurídico y político militar de la Isla Fernandina de Cuba; Hipólito Unanue, Escritos científicos; José Antonio de Villaseñor y Sánchez, Teatro americano: Descripción general de los reinos y provincias de la Nueva España. We shall also address briefly both music and painting. Secondary readings include: Dorinda Outram, The Enlightenment, and Karen Stolley, Domesticating Empire. Paper draft (midterm), book review, oral presentation, and final paper required.

PORT 351: Comparative Methodology (Also listed as SPAN 351)

TR 1:10-2:25

Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu

Comparative Methodology deals with basic methodological questions: What is Comparative Literature and how does one define it? How are Spanish and Portuguese reinvigorating the discipline? How and why is the combined Ph.D. program in Spanish and Portuguese an inherently comparative program? What possibilities does it offer? How does it prepare someone for connecting Latin American literature to inter-American literary study? What constitutes a successful comparative paper or essay? What elements must it have? What are the problems that a comparative study must avoid or resolve if it is to be successful? The course emphasizes connecting one's particular interests to the possibilities presented by the comparative method. In addition to regular presentations, a final, formal oral presentation is required as is a final comparative research paper.

 

Course Descriptions – Spanish, Catalan and Portuguese – Spring 2014

SPAN 206: Spanish for Business and Economics (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

MWF 12:10-1:00 Calhoun 103

Lori.Catanzaro@vanderbilt.edu

This course provides a thorough foundation in business vocabulary and overview of current international business and cultural concepts related to doing business in the US, Latin America, and Spain. Focusing on the role of the international manager, the course emphasizes vocabulary related to corporate organization and structure, banking and accounting processes, real estate, capital investment, human resources, the production of goods and services, marketing, financial management, and international operations articulated within the geographic and cultural context of the Spanish-speaking world. Students are evaluated through quizzes, tests, and oral presentations, final project, and final exam.

SPAN 207: Advanced Conversation (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

207-01 MWF 1:10-2:00 Furman 109 Jose.Aznar@vanderbilt.edu

207-02 MWF 11:10-12:00 Furman 007 Sarah.S.Delassus@vanderbilt.edu

This class is an advanced conversation class that will offer an intra-cultural approach contrasting Spanish, Spanish American and US perspectives. This is a content-based course that focuses primarily on the development of advanced oral language skills. The class format will consist of class discussions, debates, oral presentations, interviews and electronic discussions on contemporary issues. This class is designed for students with a high level of proficiency, especially those returning from a study abroad program. Some of the issues covered in this class will be gender relations, cultural identity, social relations, value systems, religion and education. This class is closed to native speakers.

SPAN 210: Spanish for the Legal Profession(Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

MWF 2:10-3:00 Furman 325

Cynthia.Wasick@vanderbilt.edu

Advanced conversation course and grammar review introducing basic legal terminology and concepts, cultural information, and exploration of historical and contemporary legal issues relating to the Hispanic/Latino communities in the US.  Emphasis on practical language usage.  Students will prepare daily written vocabulary and grammar review activities, thematic readings and lead class discussion and debate on the readings.  There will be three short papers (3-4 pages), one Power Point presentation based upon a short research paper which focuses on a specific historical landmark legal decision of the US Supreme Court involving the Hispanic/Latino communities (4-5 pages) and one final Power Point presentation based upon a more formal semester-long in-depth research paper (6 pages) on legal and cultural topic in consultation with the course instructor.  There will be three partial exams. Prerequisites: 201W and 202.

SPAN 211: Spanish for the Medical Profession *Service Learning Course (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

211-01 MWF 10:10-11:00 Calhoun 103

211-02 MWF 11:10-12:00 Calhoun 103

Lori.Catanzaro@vanderbilt.edu

Service learning based, advanced conversation course incorporating extensive medical terminology, and policy and cultural competency issues related to health care and the Latino population in the United States. Prerequisite: 201W and 202.

SPAN 212: Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

MWF 1:10-2:00 Furman 325

Cynthia.Wasick@vanderbilt.edu

Esta asignatura propone un estudio panorámico y orientativo de la lingüística española. Se explorarán varias áreas fundamentales de la disciplina como: la fonética (el estudio de los fonos desde el punto de vista físico), la fonología (el estudio de las relaciones de los sonidos dentro de un sistema comunicativo), la morfología (el estudio de la formación de las palabras), la sintaxis (el estudio de la estructura de las oraciones), la pragmática (el estudio del modo en que el contexto influye en la interpretación del significado), la lingüística histórica (el estudio de la evolución de la lengua a través del tiempo), la dialectología (el estudio de la variación lingüística), la sociolingüística (el estudio del uso de las lenguas en relación a la estructura social), el bilingüismo y la adquisición y el aprendizaje del español por angloparlantes.

Se evaluará al estudiante a base de unas pruebas, unos ejercicios escritos (solving problem sets), participación activa y una presentación oral de un resumen escrito de un artículo lingüístico asignado.

60%     4 pruebas

15%     ejercicios de tarea

10%     presentación oral

15%     participación en clase

Texto requerido: Introducción a la lingüística española. Milton M. Azevedo (3ª edición).
No se presupone conocimientos previos de lingüística.

SPAN 216: Phonology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

MWF 11:10-12:00 Furman 325

Cynthia.Wasick@vanderbilt.edu

Spanish Phonology consists of the study of phonological theory, as well as the practical application of its principles, as applied to the Spanish language. The primary goal of the course is to enable students to improve their pronunciation of Spanish through an analysis of the nature and the production of Spanish sounds and of pronunciation problems frequently experienced by non-native speakers. The course will provide a general understanding of the nature of human language, how speech sounds are produced and function discretely as a component of a linguistic system, and how the sounds of Spanish differ in nature and in distribution from those of English and other languages. Also considered are pronunciation problems due to spelling differences. Both standard and dialectal pronunciations of Spanish will be analyzed. Students will make six recordings based upon an assigned text in order to analyze and perfect Spanish pronunciation skills. There will be three quizzes and two exams.

Preparación, participación activa y tareas....................................12%

6 Grabaciones (6 x 3%)...................................................................18%

3 Pruebas (3 x 10%)...............................................................................30%

2 Exámenes (Mid-term 20% y Final 20%)...........................................40%

Classpak (Required: Must be purchased by the second class meeting): Dalbor, John B. Spanish Pronunciation: Theory and Practice, 3rd edition. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1997.

SPAN 218: Morphology and Syntax (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

MWF 12:10-1:00 Calhoun 219

Philip.D.Rasico@vanderbilt.edu

Spanish 218 introduces the basic principles of modern Spanish morphology (word formation) and syntax (phrase structure and usage) through an analysis of how native Spanish speakers organize reality and use language to reflect and to express that organization. As a theoretical course concerned primarily with linguistic analysis, emphasis is given to the study of the meaningful grammatical contrasts that exist in Spanish and that serve to define it as a linguistic system. Attention is also given to various grammatical contrasts between Spanish and other languages, especially English.

SPAN 227: Film and Culture in Latin America (Major: Elective; AXLE: P)

TR 2:35-3:50 TR Buttrick 301

Emanuelle.Oliveira@vanderbilt.edu

Latin American cinema from the perspective of cultural history; screenings and supplementary texts included. Focus on the cinema of the Southern Cone (Argentina and Brazil). Brazilian movies will have English subtitles. Note: Students who do their written work and exams in Portuguese may apply to the DUS for variance to count this course for Portuguese.

SPAN 232: Literature of the Spanish Golden Age (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

TR 2:35-3:50 Buttrick 304

Edward.H.Friedman@vanderbilt.edu

The course will focus on works from the early modern period (1550-1700), called the Golden Age or Siglo de Oro, a time of great flourishing of the arts that coincided with Spain's imperial glory. Students will read texts from three genres: narrative, poetry, and drama. We will do close readings and analyses of the selected works, and we will consider their critical and socio-historical contexts.

Readings:

NARRATIVE

Lazarillo de Tormes
Miguel de Cervantes, La fuerza de la sangre
María de Zayas, La inocencia castigada

Selections from Cervantes's Don Quijote and Franciscode Quevedo's La vida del buscón

POETRY

Selections by Juan Boscán, Garcilaso de la Vega, Luis de Góngora, Lope de Vega, Francisco de Quevedo, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

DRAMA

Miguel de Cervantes, "El retablo de las maravillas"

Lope de Vega, El caballero de Olmedo
Tirso de Molina, El burlador de Sevilla

SELECTED CRITICAL STUDIES

There will be a reading assignment and a short written exercise for each class. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all class sessions. Evaluation will be based on classwork and homework exercises (40%) and on three tests (60%).

SPAN 234: Spanish Literature from 1900 to the Present (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

MWF 1:10-2:00 Buttrick 305

Andres.Zamora@vanderbilt.edu

The aim of the course is to survey the history of Spanish literature from 1900 to the present.   In order to illustrate its evolution and its different genres we will read the plays Bodas de sangre by Federico García Lorca and En la ardiente oscuridad by Buero Vallejo, the novels Sonata de otoño by Valle Inclán, San Manuel Bueno, mártir by Unamuno, La familia de Pascual Duarte by Camilo José Cela, and Amor, curiosidad, prozac y dudas by Lucía Etxebarría, an anthology of poetry in volume form and photocopied selections of other poems as well as of short stories by women. We will also watch four movies outside of class. Fragments of other movies, musical works and fine arts slides and reproductions will be used throughout the semester to complement the study of the literary texts. Classes will be taught in Spanish.   Each student will give one oral presentation and make a six-page final paper, both in Spanish. The topic of the final paper will have to be approved by the professor. We will also have a midterm exam, and a final. Class participation, and of course attendance, is of the utmost importance.   Each day, the professor will give a set of questions related to the assignment that the students must answer. The object of these questions is to guide the students in their reading, to help them develop literary competence.

SPAN 235: Spanish American Literature from the Conquest to 1900 Present (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

TR 1:10 -2:25 Buttrick 204

Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@vanderbilt.edu

An introduction to the main literary trends transplanted to the Indies and their interaction with the Indian legacy in texts by Spanish, creole, mestizo and Indian writers. Readings will cover multiple genres, and these pieces will be linked to the cultural contexts from which they arose. Readings from Columbus, Ercilla, Balbuena, Bernal Díaz, Inca Garcilaso, Balbuena, and Sor Juana, among others.

A selection of texts and images will be available to the students.

Grading system

Weekly responses (40%)

Oral Presentation (5 %)

Mid term essay (15%)

Final essay (15 %)

Attendance and Participation (25%)

SPAN 237: Contemporary Lyric Poetry from Modernism to the Present in Spain and Spanish America (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

TR 1:10-2:25 Buttrick 205

Cathy.L.Jrade@vanderbilt.edu

The course will begin with a review of the most important poetic concepts and an outline of those issues tied to modern life that underpin the poetry of the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. Though the course will focus primarily on poetry from Spanish America, it will also include the most outstanding contributions from Spain.

While the developments, trends, and movements during this period will be examined, the class will emphasize the interpretation and analysis of specific poems. It will explore the power and impact of different poetic techniques and devices. It will also examine the various roles that the poets claim for themselves and their art.

Requirements:

Students will be expected to read the poems and introductory materials with great care and to be ready to participate actively in class discussion, which will be in Spanish. For every class meeting, they will hand in a reaction paper of about one-half page in length on one of the poems assigned for that day.

Students will take one partial and one final exam and will write two brief papers. They will also make one oral presentation of about 10 minutes in length during the semester on the readings for the day.

Class attendance is required, and only two absences are permissible.

SPAN 243: Latino Immigration Experience *Service Learning Course (Major: Literature; AXLE: P)

MWF 12:10-1:00 Calhoun 320

Elena.O.Segovia@vanderbilt.edu

Analysis of the immigration experience of four Latino/a groups (Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, and Dominican-American) as presented by Latino/a literature (all genres) and movies about Latinos/Latinas. This is a service-learning class and students are required to complete 20 hours of service to the Latino/a community in Nashville as part of their course work. Travel time is not included in this total, so you need to budget at least three hours per week to complete this requirement. This service experience will be considered another text and will be analyzed in class, together with the literary texts and the movies, focusing on issues of assimilation, bilingualism, biculturalism, uprootedness, etc. Final grade will be based on intense class participation, two exams, two portfolio presentations about a topic related to immigration, a detailed journal about the service experience, and a final reflection essay.

SPAN 247: Spanish American Literature of the Boom Era (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

MWF 2:10-3:00 Buttrick 204

Heraldo.Falconi@Vanderbilt.edu

In this course we will study Latin American fiction during a period (1960s and 1970s) characterized by literary experimentation and popularly called el Boom. Some of the authors surveyed include Cortázar, García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes and Vargas Llosa. Literature will be placed in both historical and cultural context and will be accompanied by key theoretical readings. Final grade will be based on active participation, class reports, 2 exams and two research papers (5 or 6 pages.)

SPAN 260: Development of the Short Story (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

MWF 12:10-1:00 Furman 217

Christina.Karageorgou@vanderbilt.edu

The objective of the course is multiple: a) to offer a panoramic view of the short-story production in Hispanic literatures; b) to provide skill for critical analysis; c) to promote interpretive writing in Spanish. We are going to use El cuento: arte y análisis, an anthology in which both male and female writers from Spain and Latin America are represented. An oral presentation of 20 minutes, a mid term take home exam, and a final research paper will be the requirements for this course.

SPAN 280: Undergraduate Seminar (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

Topic: What is Enlightenment?

TR 11:00-12:15 Furman 325

Ruth.Hill@vanderbilt.edu

What does it mean to be human? How should the human and the humanities be taught and learned? What does it mean to be enlightened? What does it mean to be ignorant? Who decides and enforces the answers to such questions? This undergraduate seminar focuses on the Enlightenment, or the so-called Age of Reason—the 18th century— during which period the Western world underwent profound cultural and political transformations. The Hispanic world, our particular focus, launched educational and political initiatives that would result in such events as women's education opportunities, Latin American Independence, and the end of slavery. Given that the Enlightenment was the most interdisciplinary era in the intellectual history of the Hispanic world, our readings shall range from poetry to physics, from educational debates to discussions of individual freedom, and from the essay to the newspaper article.   All discussion and assignments in Spanish. Evaluation based on participation and a 15-page research paper.

SPAN 294: Special Topics in Hispanic Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: none)

Topic: Alterity and Migration in Contemporary Spanish Literature and Film

MWF 11:10-12:00 Furman 311

Michelle.Shepherd@vanderbilt.edu

In this course, we will analyze difference in contemporary Spain: how it is remembered, negotiated and deployed to construct "Others." Alterity or "Otherness," does not describe individual difference, but the systematized construction of groups of people. In this course, we will examine alterity in twentieth and twenty-first century Spanish literature, focusing on the representation of migrants: internal immigrants during the mid-twentieth century and foreign immigrants in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. These texts, in charting constructions of difference in Spain, will also allow us to analyze the values and attitudes that shape Spanish national identities and historical shifts in these collective approaches to Otherness. We will read texts by Nieves García Benito, Rachid Nini, and José Ovejero. We will also watch three films: Poniente (dir. Chus Gutiérrez 2000), 14 kilómetros (dir. Gerardo Olivares 2007), and Amador (dir. Fernando León de Aranoa 2010). Grades will be determined through class participation, daily reflections, exams (2), a midterm essay, a final essay, and class presentations.

SPAN 296: Special Topics in Hispanic Culture (Major: Elective; AXLE: none)

Topic: Inventing Indians

TR 9:35-10:50 Furman 325

Ruth.Hill@vanderbilt.edu

How were the first peoples in the Americas transformed into "Indians"? This course surveys the uses of the native in South American and American Southern cultures during the sixtenth through nineteenth centuries. We shall cover topics such as colonialism and the just war controversy, the noble savage, the Vanishing Indian thesis, Indian removal, Native American ownership of African-American slaves, and the distinct but sometimes overlapping definitions of Indian and Black. Our readings will include colonial and 19th-century primary texts written in Spanish and English, visual texts, and theoretical readings on identity, race, and colonialism.   All discussion and assignments in Spanish. Evaluation based on participation and four written exams and/or short papers.

Spanish Majors may take either Catalan 102 or Portuguese 102 (each a beginning course designed for Spanish speakers) to count as 3 hours of elective in the Spanish major only. They cannot count toward a Spanish minor.

CTLN 102: Intensive Elementary Catalan (Spanish Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

MWF 10:10-11:00 Furman 209

Philip.D.Rasico@vanderbilt.edu

This course is an intensive introduction to Catalan, a Romance language of some eight million people of northeastern Spain (Catalonia, Valencia, the Balearic Islands, and a portion of eastern Aragon), the Principality of Andorra, the Department of Roussillon in southwestern France, as well as the town of Alguer (Alghero) on the island of Sardinia. Emphasis will be on oral/aural communication, grammar, reading and culture. Prior study of another Romance language through the intermediate level is highly recommended. May be counted as an elective toward the major in Spanish.

PORT 102: Intensive Elementary Portuguese (4 hrs) (Spanish Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

01 MTRF 10:05-10:55 Buttrick 312

02 MTRF 12:10-1:00 Buttrick 312

An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor. May be counted as an elective toward the major in Spanish.

PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese (AXLE: INT)

MWF 1:10-2:00 Calhoun 104

Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu

Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language. The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc).

PORT 201: Portuguese Composition and Conversation (AXLE: INT)

TR 11:00-12:15 Furman 302

Earl.E.Fitz@vanderbilt.edu

Portuguese Composition is a writing course for students who control the basic structure of the language and need to develop control of written communication at an advanced level. The course seeks to explore various aspects of Brazilian society while practicing advanced level grammar topics, discussing the readings, and engaging in the process of writing. Prerequisite: Port 200.

PORT 205: Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature (AXLE: HCA)

TR 1:10-2:25 Furman 302

Earl.E.Fitz@vanderbilt.edu

Portuguese 205 is an introduction to Luso-Brazilian literature through the reading and analysis of literary texts and other cultural productions (such as films and music). Prerequisite: Port 201 or 203.

PORT 233: Modern Brazilian Literature (AXLE: HCA)

MWF 11:10-12:00 Buttrick 212

Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu

The development of Brazilian literature from the Semana de Arte Moderna to the present. We will explore key aspects of Brazilian Modernism such as the concept of cultural anthropophagy, as well as the tensions between the national and regional identities. Novels, short stories, and poetry by masters of the Brazilian literature will include Mario de Andrade (Macunaíma, Pauliceia Desvairada), Oswald de Andrade (Manifesto Antopófago), Vinícius de Moraes (Nova Antologia Poética), Carlos Drummond de Andrade (A Rosa do Povo), Jorge Amado (Gabriela Cravo e Canela), Clarice Lispector (Laços de Família), Guimarães Rosa (Grande Sertão: Veredas), João Cabral de Melo Neto (Morte e Vida Severina), Nelson Rodrigues (A Vida Como Ela É), and Augusto de Campos (Viva Vaia). Finally, we will explore contemporary authors who recently established themselves in the pantheon of Brazilian literature: Cristovão Tezza (O Filho Eterno, 2007) and Milton Hatoum (Dois Irmãos, 2000 and Cinzas do Norte, 2005).

PORT 294-01: Special Topics in Portuguese Language, Literature or Culture

Topic: Soccer in Brazilian Culture (No AXLE credit)

TR 11:00-12:15 Furman 007

Emanuelle.Oliveira@vanderbilt.edu

Considering the upcoming World Cup in Brazil, this course examines soccer as one of the main components of Brazilian national identity. Soccer is analyzed through the study of literature, cinema, media, and popular culture. Critical texts in diverse areas of humanities and social sciences (sociology, anthropology, literary criticism, etc) will be used.

PORT 294-02: Special Topics in Portuguese Language, Literature or Culture

Topic: Film and Culture in Latin America (AXLE: P as Span 227)

TR 2:35-3:50 Buttrick 301

Emanuelle.Oliveira@vanderbilt.edu

See Span 227.

Portuguese students should register for this course as Span 227. Students who do all written work in Portuguese students may apply to the Director of Undergraduate Studies Maria.P.Pintane@vanderbilt.edu to count the course toward Portuguese requirements.

 

©