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For the Undergraduate School Catalog please follow this link:

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/catalogs/undergrad/UGAD.pdf

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPANISH AND PORTUGUESEFALL 2015

 

SPANISH

SPAN 3340 (old 207): Advanced Conversation (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

01 MWF 2:10-3:00 Furman 325

02 MWF 11:10-12:00 Stevenson 1313

Heraldo.Falconi@Vanderbilt.edu

This class is an advanced conversation class that will offer an intra-cultural approach contrasting Spanish, Spanish American and US perspectives. This is a content-based course that focuses primarily on the development of advanced oral language skills. The class format will consist of class discussions, debates, oral presentations, interviews and electronic discussions on contemporary issues. This class is designed for students with a high level of proficiency, especially those returning from a study abroad program.  Some of the issues covered in this class will be gender relations, cultural identity, social relations, value systems, religion and education. This class is closed to native speakers.

 

SPAN 3345 (old 206): Spanish for Business and Economics (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

01 MWF 12:10-1:00 Calhoun 337

02 MWF 11:10-12:00 Calhoun 337

Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu

This course provides a thorough foundation in business vocabulary and an overview of business and cultural concepts, emphasizing international business communications skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Focusing on the role of the international manager, the course emphasizes vocabulary related to corporate organization and structure, finance, banking and accounting processes, capital investment, human resources, the production of goods and services, marketing, financial management, and international operations articulated within the geographic and cultural context of the Spanish-speaking world and its place in the global economy. Students are evaluated through essays, tests, oral presentations, final project, and final exam.

 

SPAN 3355 (old 208): Advanced Conversation through Cultural Issues in Film (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

MWF 12:10-1:00 Calhoun 104

Elena.O.Segovia@Vanderbilt.edu

    Advanced conversation course using fifteen films in Spanish, from eight areas of the Spanish-speaking world, as the basis for discussion of linguistic, historic, cultural, and social issues (such as “machismo/marianismo;” Liberation Theology; migration; the convergence of history, politics and religion).

    This course is not recommended for students coming directly from Spanish 3302 (old 202) or Spanish 3303 (old 203). It is intended for students who would like to improve their listening comprehension, communication skills and cultural understanding prior to studying abroad, as well as for those returning from studying abroad who would like to keep up their high level of aural/oral proficiency.

    All fifteen movies have no subtitles. Final grade will be based on intense class participation, five critical reviews, two exams, two oral presentations, and one research paper.

 

SPAN 3360 (old 221): Spanish Civilization (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

TR 1:10-2:25 Buttrick 204

Maria.P.Pintane@vanderbilt.edu

Este curso ofrece una visión de la cultura y civilización de España desde sus orígenes hasta la actualidad a través de un acercamiento interdisciplinario. Durante la primera parte del semestre se prestará especial atención a la historia de España como un marco de referencia que nos ayuda a contextualizar los textos, formas y símbolos que han pasado a formar parte de la identidad cultural española. Asimismo, el curso prestará especial atención a la sociedad española contemporánea y a los conflictos que surgen con su legado histórico. Entre otros temas, analizaremos la identidad cultural que nace con las autonomías en la España democrática post-franquista; los cambios en la sociedad con las nuevas políticas de inmigración; las representaciones artísticas del pasado en el cine; los jóvenes y la cultura popular; la crisis económica y la creación de nuevos partidos políticos.

Para lograr estos objetivos, se leerán, además del libro de texto, fragmentos de textos históricos, y artículos periodísticos extraídos de diarios nacionales y autonómicos. Asimismo, se discutirán cinco películas.

EVALUACION

Midterm Examen (25%)

Ensayo y Presentación final (30%)

Reseñas de películas (20%)

Participación y preparación (25%)

 

SPAN 3830 (old 211): Spanish for the Medical Profession *Service Learning Course (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)

MWF 10:10-11:00 Calhoun 337

Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu

Service-learning based, this advanced conversation course incorporates extensive medical terminology, public policy and cultural competency issues related to health care and the Latino population in the United States. Students are evaluated through essays, tests, oral presentations, service work, and final exam. Prerequisite: 3301W (old 201W) and 3302 (old 202); closed to native speakers of Spanish.

 

SPAN 4315 (old 217): Contrastive Analysis (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

MWF 1:10-2:00 Calhoun 219

Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu

This course proposes to be a comparative analysis of the phonological, morphological, lexical, semantic and syntactical structures of Spanish and English. We will study the similarities and differences between the linguistic systems of these two languages and try to identify and explain the possible origin of different types of errors common to English-speaking students who study Spanish as a Second Language. We will analyze both oral and written English and Spanish. There will be assigned homework and readings as well as graded individual, pair and group assignments. In addition, there will be three exams. Some readings and course materials located on Blackboard.

 

SPAN 4320 (old 216): Phonology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

MWF 10:10-11:00 Buttrick 305

Cynthia.Wasick@vanderbilt.edu

Spanish Phonology consists of the study of phonological theory, as well as the practical application of its principles, as applied to the Spanish language. The primary goal of the course is to enable students to improve their pronunciation of Spanish through an analysis of the nature and the production of Spanish sounds and of pronunciation problems frequently experienced by non-native speakers. The course will provide a general understanding of the nature of human language, how speech sounds are produced and function discretely as a component of a linguistic system, and how the sounds of Spanish differ in nature and in distribution from those of English and other languages. Also considered are pronunciation problems due to spelling differences. Both standard and dialectal pronunciations of Spanish will be analyzed. Students will make six recordings based upon an assigned text in order to analyze and perfect Spanish pronunciation skills. There will be three quizzes and two exams.

Preparación, participación activa y tareas (12%)

6 Grabaciones (6 x 3% = 18%)

3 Pruebas (3 x 10% = 30%)

2 Exámenes (Mid-term 20% y Final 20% = 40%)

Classpak (Required: Must be purchased by the second class meeting): Dalbor, John B. Spanish Pronunciation: Theory and Practice, 3rd edition. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1997.

 

SPAN 4340 (old 219): History of the Spanish Language (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

TR 9:35-10:50 Buttrick 112

Philip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu

This course will examine in detail the evolution of the Spanish (Castilian) language from its Vulgar Latin origins to its modern forms. Emphasis will be given to the analysis of the phonological and morphological development of Spanish within the context of the historical and cultural background of the Iberian Peninsula. The impact of non-Roman languages and cultures upon Spanish will be considered as well as the evolution of various non-Castilian languages and dialects of Spain.

 

SPAN 4345 (old 220): Languages of Spain (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)

MWF 12:10-1:00 Calhoun 219

Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu

This course will give students a brief overview of the formation of the Spanish languages of the Iberian Peninsula and their development into the modern languages of Castilian, Catalan, and Galician. In addition, we will briefly explore the non-Indo-European language of Basque. We will analyze each respective language by focusing on the differences in the lexical, phonological, and morphosyntactic features and systems. We will discuss issues related to bilingualism, biculturalism and the debate between linguistic theory, actual linguistic reality and the legislation and imposition of official linguistic policy by government and language academies. There will be four quizzes, one group presentation of a linguistic study, one 3 page reflection paper based upon the linguistic study and one final take home exam.

Preparation, active participation and assignments (15%)

4 quizzes (4 x 10% = 40%)

1 group presentation and personal reflection paper (20%)

Final Exam – Take Home (25%)

Readings and course materials located on Blackboard.

 

SPAN 4405 (old 232): Literature of the Spanish Golden Age (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

MWF 11:10-12:00 Calhoun 423

Victoria.Gardner@Vanderbilt.edu

The course will focus on works from the early modern period (1550-1700), called the Golden Age or Siglo de Oro, a time of great flourishing of the arts that coincided with Spain's imperial glory. Students will read texts from three genres: narrative, poetry, and drama. We will do close readings and analyses of the selected works, and we will consider their critical and socio-historical contexts.

Readings:

   Narrative: Lazarillo de Tormes; Miguel de Cervantes, La fuerza de la sangre, La española inglesa; María de Zayas, La inocencia castigada, El jardín engañoso

   Poetry:  Selections by Juan Boscán, Garcilaso de la Vega, Luis de Góngora, Lope de Vega, Francisco de Quevedo, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

   Drama: Miguel de Cervantes, "El retablo de las maravillas;" Lope de Vega, Fuenteovejuna, Juan Ruiz de Alarcón, La verdad sospechosa

   Selected Critical Studies: There will be a reading assignment and a short written exercise for each class. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all class sessions. Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in classwork, homework exercises and three tests, one per genre studied: narrative, drama and poetry.

 

SPAN 4425 (old 236): Spanish American Literature 1900 to the Present (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

TR 4:00-5:15 Wilson 122

Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu

An introduction to the major trends in Latin American literature and culture during the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from realism to magical realism, touching upon major genres such as the novel, theater, poetry, and the essay. Evaluation based on three textual analyses and a final exam, as well as active and informed participation. All discussions and coursework conducted in Spanish.

 

SPAN 4620 (old 256) Love and Honor in Medieval and Golden Age Spanish Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

MWF 1:10-2:00 Buttrick 305

Victoria.A.Burrus@Vanderbilt.edu

Love and honor are key themes in both medieval and Golden Age Spanish literature. This course will explore the evolution of these themes in a number of important works of different genres from these two periods, paying special attention to the socio-historical context in which they were written. Especially interesting will be the works in which these themes come into conflict with each other. (Not open to students who have taken Span 4400 = old 231.)

Texts:

Poema del Cid

Don Juan Manuel, El conde Lucanor (on BB)

Jorge Manrique, Coplas por la muerte de su padre (on BB)

Fernando de Rojas, La Celestina

Lazarillo de Tormes (on BB)

Guillén de Castro, Las mocedades del Cid

Francisco de Rojas Zorrilla, Del rey abajo, ninguno

Pedro Calderón de la Barca, El alcalde de Zalamea

 

SPAN 4670 (old 258): Spanish Realism: Instructions and Method for Fabricating People (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)

TR 11:00-12:15 Furman 132

Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu

Frankenstein, Pinocchio, the proliferation of talking statues, the abundant revival of the Pygmalion myth, the popularity of automatons in the toy industry . . .  the nineteenth century, in spite of, or maybe due to, its positivism, scientific spirit, and materialism, seemed obsessed with the fabrication of people. One of the most effective gadgets devised in order to achieve that purpose was the realist novel.  In fact, the standard of quality by which the realist novels were measured was their ability to create “characters of flesh and bone,” figures able “to stand out of the page.” The novels had to be people-producing machines; the author was equated to God, or to a fertile father; the characters were considered his offspring, and, aside from their biological sex, were unanimously “feminized,” that is, forced to adopt in its relation with the author the traits that the cultural discourse of the times considered inherent to women: passivity, receptivity, penetrability. We will examine the mechanisms that the realist novelist used to achieve all those goals.  In order to do that, we will read excerpts of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, two exemplary short stories by Balzac and Clarín, fragments of La Regenta by Clarín and of Galdós’s Fortunata y Jacinta, and two complete novels: Insolación by Emilia Pardo Bazán and Tristana by Galdós.  We will also read some pieces of literary theory and criticism. Furthermore, we will illustrate the discussion of the literary texts with references to a set of paintings and caricatures of the nineteenth century as well with the viewing, outside of class, of three movies: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Tristana and Blade Runner.
The class will be taught in Spanish.  Each student will give one oral presentation and produce a six-page final paper, both in Spanish. The topic of the final paper has to be approved by the professor.  We will also have a midterm exam, and a final.  Class participation, and of course attendance, is of the utmost importance. Each day, the professor will give a set of questions related to the assignment that the students must answer. The object of these questions is to guide the students in their reading, to help them develop a literary competence.                       
 

SPAN 4750 (old 244): Afro-Hispanic Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: P)

TR 1:10-2:25 Furman 007

William.Luis@Vanderbilt.edu

The African presence in Spanish America represents an important and indispensable part of this region’s history. However, people of African descent contribute to a different interpretation of the same history, one that is written not from a dominant but a marginal perspective. Afro-Hispanic literature can be traced to the early nineteenth century, when Cuban antislavery writers wrote about slavery. In the twentieth century authors continued to write about slaves and the lives of other blacks. In this course we will study Afro-Hispanic literature, from its inception to the present, written in countries like Cuba, Colombia, Costa Rica, Uruguay, Panama, and Peru.   We will read works from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and focus on the antislavery narrative, Negrismo and Afro-Caribbean poetry, Afro-Cuban religions (Santería), and blacks in films. Some of the readings may include Juan Francisco Manzano’s  Autobiografia, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda’s Sab, Alejo Carpentier’s El reino de este mundo, Miguel Barnet’s Biografía de un cimarrón, Manuel Zapata Olivella’s Changó, el gran putas, Carlos Guillermo Wilson’s Los nietos de Felicidad Dolores, and Quince Duncan’s Los cuatro espejos.

 

SPAN 4760 (old 274): Literature and Medicine: Disease Constructs in Puerto Rico (Major: Literature; AXLE: P)

TR 2:35-3:50 Furman 311

Benigno.Trigo@Vanderbilt.edu

What are some of the social meanings of the representation of disease in literature and in medicine? We will answer this question by way of Puerto Rico, an autonomous territory and possession of the United States. We will trace the shifts in the configuration of four related public health crises on that Caribbean island as they are represented in both medical literature and fiction during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: tropical disease, overpopulation, AIDS and mass hysteria. We will shift our focus from the concerns of military doctors with hygiene during the nineteenth century to the disquiet of late-twentieth century psychologists and cultural anthropologists with the hysteria of the Puerto Rican citizen. We will study disease as something more than a biological event, putting it in the context of colonization, self-government, and modernization. And we will focus on both literary and medical texts in Spanish to suggest the ways in which disease is both an empirical and a symbolic event, the result of both biological causes and of socially determined preconceptions and beliefs.

 

PORTUGUESE

 

Spanish Majors may take Portuguese 1103 (old 102), a beginning course designed for students who already know Spanish, offered every semester, as an elective in the Spanish major (but not the minor).

 

PORT 1103 (old 102): Intensive Elementary Portuguese (Elective in Spanish Major; AXLE: INT)

01 MTRF 11:10-12:00 Wilson 129

02 MTRF 12:10-1:00 Buttrick 301

An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor. NOTE: May be counted as 3 hours of elective toward the Spanish major. [4 hours]

 

PORT 2203 (old 200): Intermediate Portuguese (AXLE: INT)

MWF 11:10-12:00 Wilson 121

Marcio.Bahia@Vanderbilt.edu

Intermediate Portuguese is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 1103 (old 102) or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language. The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc.).

 

                  PORT 3301 (old 201): Portuguese Composition and Conversation (AXLE: INT)
TR 1:10-2:25 Furman 330

Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu

Portuguese Composition is a writing course for students who control the basic structure of the language and need to develop control of written communication at an advanced level. The course seeks to explore various aspects of Brazilian society while practicing advanced level grammar topics, discussing the readings, and engaging in the process of writing. Prerequisite: Port 2203 (old 200).

 

PORT 3303 (old 205): Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature

MWF 12:10 Furman 319

Marcio.Bahia@Vanderbilt.edu

Portuguese 3303 is an introduction to Luso-Brazilian literature through the reading and analysis of literary texts and other cultural productions (such as films and music). Prerequisite: Port 3301 (formerly 201) or 3302 (formerly 203).

 

                  PORT 4420 (old 232): Brazilian Literature through the Nineteenth Century (AXLE: HCA)
TR 9:35-10:50 Furman 330 
                  Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
               
Main literary trends, principal writers and works of Brazilian literature, from colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Study of the works of Gregório de Matos, Antônio Vieira, Gonçalves Dias, Alencar, Machado de Assis, and João da Cruz e Sousa. Prerequisite: Port 3303 (old 205); see the Director of Undergraduate Studies for a possible override if you do not have the prerequisite.
               
 
 

Senior Majors may, with permission of the instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies, take a graduate level course. Registration must be handled separately through the Graduate School.

 

SPAN/PORT 6010 (old 301): Literary Analysis and Theory

T 3:10-5:30 Furman 319

Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu

This course is intended as a basic introduction to twentieth-century and contemporary literary theory at a graduate level. One of its objectives will be to provide the students with a survey of theoretical models, terminologies and working tools for literary analysis. We will read general introductions and relevant texts of Russian formalism, New Criticism, reader oriented theories, Marxism, structuralism, psychoanalytic literary theory, feminisms, poststructuralism, postmodernism, cultural studies, New Historicism, postcolonial studies, and gender studies. We will complement the theoretical readings with a selection of different pieces of textual criticism.

 

SPAN/PORT 6020 (old 302): Ibero-Romance Philology          

T 3:10-5:30 Furman 325

Philip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu

This seminar is designed to provide an overview of the origin, formation and evolution of the Ibero-Romance languages and dialects, with special emphasis given to developments in the Iberian Peninsula. In addition to the assigned readings for specific class meetings (listed on the course syllabus), the following will be required of all students enrolled in the seminar:

a) A scholarly research paper on a particular Ibero-Romance language/dialect or on some specific aspect(s) of one or more language(s)/dialect(s). The topic must be chosen in consultation with the professor. The paper will be due no later than the final day of classes for the semester.

b) A brief in-class progress report on the research paper topic.

 

SPAN 8140 (old 363): Modern Spanish Poetry and Poetics: The Prose Poem: Tradition and/or Clairvoyance?

F 1:10-3:30   Furman 319 

Christina.Karageorgou@Vanderbilt.edu

The object of this graduate seminar is to examine the encounter of poetry and prose in the hybrid genre of the prose poem. We will start with Modernismo and follow the trajectory of the prose poem and its practitioners throughout the twentieth century. By examining the cultural and epistemological needs that gave birth, fueled and are sustaining the prose poem, the seminar aims at showing the ways in which registering history and everyday life becomes the core of literary aesthetics in late modernity. Thus the prose poem is conceived as a discursive model capable of accounting for plot and affects, deeds and ideas, by unveiling layer after layer the intricacies of lyric and narrative strategies of reference in search of experience, memory, and ideology. We will inform the theoretical point of view of the course with readings by Michel de Certeau, Hayden White, Paul Ricoeur, Merleau-Ponty, and we will read poets such as Rubén Darío, César Vallejo, Luis Cernuda, Federico García Lorca, Oliverio Girondo, Borges, Alejandra Pizarnik, and Antonio Gamoneda.

 

SPAN 8150 (old 372): 20th-21st Century Spanish Literature: Contemporary Spanish Narratives

R 3:10-5:30 Furman 319

Michelle.Murray@Vanderbilt.edu

In this seminar, we will critically analyze contemporary Spanish narrative in light of the sociocultural transformations Spain has experienced from the postwar to the present. We will specifically examine representations of the Civil War and postwar, urbanization, gender, national identities, and the 2008 global financial crisis. Novels may include: La plaza del diamante; Tiempo de silencio; Don Julián; El cuarto de atrás; Cuestión de amor propio; Historias del Kronen; Amor, curiosidad, Prozac, y dudas; El jinete polaco; Corazón tan blanco; Habíamos ganado la guerra; La voz dormida; Nocilla Dream; 2020; and En la orilla. The course also has a narratological dimension that incorporates philosophical and social perspectives on the recurrent questions of form: what is narrative, how is it produced, how can it be understood, and what is its purpose? Thus, we will complement primary texts with secondary materials on theories of the novel; novelistic subjectivity; voice and text; body and text; the dilemma of the quotidian; and novelistic form in relation to political economy. Secondary materials may include writings by Mikhail Bakhtin, Mieke Bal, Silvia Burunat, Roland Barthes, Jonathan Culler, Jacques Derrida, Monika Fludernik, Gérard Genette, Jo Labanyi, György Lukàcs, Michael McKeon, and Julio Ortega.

 

SPAN 8300 (old 375): Trans-Atlantic Literature and Culture: From Trans-Atlantic to Trans-American

W 3:10-5:30  Wilson 122

Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu

An exploration of works on the Americas penned by Europeans, works on Latin America written by USAmerican authors, and works on the United States written by Latin American authors. Readings may include: Josep Nicasi Milà de la Roca, Los misterios de Barcelona; Frances Calderón de la Barca, Life in Mexico;Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; J. E. Rodó, Ariel; José Vasconcelos, Raza cósmica; Joseph Conrad, Nostromo; Alejo Carpentier, Los pasos perdidos; Gayl Jones, Corregidora; Joan Didion, Miami and Salvador; Toni Morrison, A Mercy. Methodology rooted in cultural-studies and close-reading approaches. Evaluation based on research paper draft with annotated bibliography, active and informed participation in discussions, critical book review, and final research paper.

 

 


 
 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPANISH AND PORTUGUESESPRING 2015
 
SPANISH
 
SPAN 206: Spanish for Business and Economics (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
MWF 12:10-1:00 Calhoun 103
Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu
This course provides a thorough foundation in business vocabulary and overview of current international business and cultural concepts related to doing business in the US, Latin America, and Spain. Focusing on the role of the international manager, the course emphasizes vocabulary related to corporate organization and structure, banking and accounting processes, real estate, capital investment, human resources, the production of goods and services, marketing, financial management, and international operations articulated within the geographic and cultural context of the Spanish-speaking world. Students are evaluated through quizzes, tests, and oral presentations, final project, and final exam.
 
SPAN 207: Advanced Conversation (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
207-01 MWF 1:10-2:00 Furman 109
207-02 MWF 11:10-12:00 Furman 007
This class is an advanced conversation class that will offer an intra-cultural approach contrasting Spanish, Spanish American and US perspectives. This is a content-based course that focuses primarily on the development of advanced oral language skills. The class format will consist of class discussions, debates, oral presentations, interviews and electronic discussions on contemporary issues. This class is designed for students with a high level of proficiency, especially those returning from a study abroad program.  Some of the issues covered in this class will be gender relations, cultural identity, social relations, value systems, religion and education. This class is closed to native speakers.
 
SPAN 212: Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
MWF 10:10-11:00 Furman 325
Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu
Esta asignatura propone un estudio panorámico y orientativo de la lingüística española. Se explorarán varias áreas fundamentales de la disciplina como: la fonética (el estudio de los fonos desde el punto de vista físico), la fonología (el estudio de las relaciones de los sonidos dentro de un sistema comunicativo), la morfología (el estudio de la formación de las palabras), la sintaxis (el estudio de la estructura de las oraciones), la pragmática (el estudio del modo en que el contexto influye en la interpretación del significado), la lingüística histórica (el estudio de la evolución de la lengua a través del tiempo), la dialectología (el estudio de la variación lingüística), la sociolingüística (el estudio del uso de las lenguas en relación a la estructura social), el bilingüismo y la adquisición y el aprendizaje del español por angloparlantes.
Se evaluará al estudiante a base de unas pruebas, unos ejercicios escritos, y  participación activa.
80% 4 pruebas (4 x 20%)
10% ejercicios de tarea
10% participación en clase
Texto requerido: Introducción a la lingüística española. Milton M. Azevedo (3ª edición).
No se supone conocimientos previos de lingüística.
 
SPAN 213: Translation and Interpretation (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
01 MWF 12:10 Calhoun 423
02 MWF   1:10 Calhoun 423
Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu
Students will be introduced to the history and theory of translation and interpretation of English to Spanish and Spanish to English with an emphasis on practical translation of written texts. Students will work on various translation exercises from a variety of fields: business and economics, commercial advertisements, legal documents, political campaign propaganda, medical and scientific documents, instructional assembly manuals, newspaper articles, entertainment industry, personal interviews, sports reports, public affairs announcements, travel and tourism guides as well as literary texts. There will be individual translation and interpretation exercises in addition to group projects.
Proposed grade distribution / evaluation:
Quizzes = 10%
Homework and Class Participation = 10%
Translations = 20%
Final translation project = 20%
Exams (2) = 20%
Final exam (Take home) = 20%
Prerequisite: 201W and 202.
 
SPAN 216: Phonology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
TR 9:35-10:50 Furman 325
Philip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu
Spanish Phonology consists of the study of phonological theory, as well as the practical application of its principles, as applied to the Spanish language. The primary goal of the course is to enable students to improve their pronunciation of Spanish through an analysis of the nature and the production of Spanish sounds and of pronunciation problems frequently experienced by non-native speakers.  The course will provide a general understanding of the nature of human language, how speech sounds are produced and function discretely as a component of a linguistic system, and how the sounds of Spanish differ in nature and in distribution from those of English and other languages.  Also considered are pronunciation problems due to spelling differences.  Both standard and dialectal pronunciations of Spanish will be analyzed.
 
SPAN 226: Film and Recent Cultural Trends in Spain (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
TR 9:35-10:50 Buttrick 212
Michelle.Murray@Vanderbilt.edu
This course explores issues in contemporary Spanish culture through the medium of film. Themes include the memory of the Spanish Civil War and Franco's dictatorship, the Transition to democracy, nationalisms, migration, and gender; and films may include Raza (dir. Sáenz de Heredía 1942), Calle mayor (dir. Bardem 1956), El inquilino (dir. Nieves Conde 1957), Cría cuervos (dir. Saura 1976), La lengua de las mariposas (dir. Cuerda 1999), Los lunes al sol (dir. León de Aranoa 2002), El laberinto del fauno (dir. del Toro 2006), También la lluvia (dir. Bollaín 2010), and Ocho apellidos vascos (Martínez-Lázaro 2014). In addition, we will read complementary articles that serve as tools that help us understand cinematic and cultural critique. Grades will be determined through class participation, daily reflections, a midterm exam, and a final essay.
 
SPAN 231 The Origins of Spanish Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
MWF 11:10-12:00 Furman 325
Victoria.A.Burrus@Vanderbilt.edu
This course covers the medieval period in Spanish literature and examines texts dating from the 12th to the 15th century.  Works are placed in their socio-historical context. Three masterworks form the bulk of the reading: the Poema del Cid, the Libro de buen amor (Juan Ruiz) and Celestina (Fernando de Rojas).  Other works covered include selections from the Milagros de Nuestra Señora (Gonzalo de Berceo), El Conde Lucanor (Don Juan Manuel), and a variety of 15th-century poetry.  Weekly mini-análisis based on the readings are required and, with class discussion, form a major part of the grade.
 
SPAN 235: Spanish American Literature from the Conquest to 1900 (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
TR 1:10 Wilson 122
Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu
In this course we shall be analyzing the cultural contexts, key themes, and literary devices of a cluster of Latin American texts from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.  Our focus will range from the religious (sermons, paintings, life stories) to the scientific (excerpts from works in physics, natural history, medicine), and from the social (historiography, theater) to the personal (lyric poetry, letters).  Requirements include three papers (5 pp.) written in Spanish.
 
SPAN 243: Latino Immigration Experience *Service Learning Course (Major: Literature; AXLE: P)
MWF 12:10-1:00 Calhoun 320
Elena.O.Segovia@Vanderbilt.edu
Analysis of the immigration experience of four Latino/a groups (Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, and Dominican-American) as presented by Latino/a literature (all genres) and movies about Latinos/Latinas.  This is a service-learning class and students are required to complete 20 hours of service to the Latino/a community in Nashville as part of their course work. Travel time is not included in this total, so you need to budget at least three hours per week to complete this requirement. This service experience will be considered another text and will be analyzed in class, together with the literary texts and the movies, focusing on issues of assimilation, bilingualism, biculturalism, uprootedness, etc.  The final grade for the course will be based on intense class participation, two exams, two portfolio presentations about a topic related to immigration, a detailed journal about the service experience, and a final reflection essay.
 
SPAN 264: Alterity and Migration in Contemporary Spain (Major: Literature; AXLE: P)
TR 11:00-12:15 Buttrick 112
Michelle.Murray@Vanderbilt.edu
In this course, we will analyze difference in contemporary Spain: how it is remembered, negotiated and deployed to construct “Others.” Alterity or “Otherness,” does not describe individual difference, but the systematized construction of groups of people. In this course, we will examine alterity in twentieth and twenty-first century Spanish literature, focusing on the representation of migrants: internal immigrants during the mid-twentieth century and foreign immigrants in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. These texts, in charting constructions of difference in Spain, will also allow us to analyze the values and attitudes that shape Spanish national identities and historical shifts in these collective approaches to Otherness. Texts may include literary works by Nieves García Benito, and José Ovejero, and Jorge Semprún and films by Chus Gutiérrez and Fernando León de Aranoa. Grades will be determined through class participation, daily reflections, mini-analyses (2), a midterm essay, a final essay, and class presentations.
 
SPAN 277: Literary Genres and National Identity in Latin America (Major: Literature; AXLE: P)
TR 1:10-2:25 Buttrick 205
Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@Vanderbilt.edu
A comparative approach to the rise of the national literary traditions of Latin America from Independence to the second half of the 20th century, focused on the inclusion / exclusion of colonial figures such as African slaves, indigenous peoples, and Argentine Gauchos. Readings in the works of Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, José Hernández, Clorinda Matto de Turner, José María Arguedas, Miguel Barnet, Nicolás Guillén and Jorge Luis Borges. The final grade will be based on three short papers (60%) and class participation (40%).
 
SPAN 280: Undergraduate Seminar (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
Topic: Colonial Americas
TR 11:00-12:15 Wilson 113
Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu
An exploration of original source materials from, as well as literature about, the Spanish, French, and British colonial societies in the Americas.  Should we compare the Americas? How were political, economic, and cultural relations between colonies within a national tradition?  What is the Global South and is it a valid analytical tool for understanding slavery, plantation economies, and cultural developments across the colonial Americas? Readings include selections from novels, poetry, theater, newspapers, travel reports, and chronicles.  Visual cultural materials (book illustrations, paintings) will also be analyzed. Discussion, tests, and 10-page research paper, all in Spanish.
 
SPAN 294: Special Topics in Hispanic Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: none)
Topic: Love and Desire in Hispanic Poetry
TR 2:35-3:50 Furman 311
Christina.Karageorgou@Vanderbilt.edu
Amor y Erotismo en la Poesía Hispánica
     El propósito del curso es familiarizar a las/los estudiantes con dos vertientes de la poesía hispánica: la amorosa y la erótica. Veremos los dos temas como complementarios, pero también como contrastantes. Algunas de las preguntas a las que responderemos a lo largo del curso son: ¿Cuáles son las estrategias que utiliza la poesía para expresar el amor y cuáles para representar la pasión erótica? ¿Qué tipo de voz habla de amores y qué de pasión? ¿Cómo contribuyen la imaginación, el alma, la emoción, el cuerpo, el deseo, la prohibición, en las representaciones amorosa y erótica? ¿Qué papel juega el género en la plasmación de ambos temas? Buscaremos respuestas a estas preguntas a través de los siglos de producción poética amorosa y erótica. Veremos cómo cambian los motivos, las estrategias, las máscaras de la voz lírica que entrega al/a lector/a el mundo de su intimidad. Observaremos la creación y comunicación de este espacio íntimo a través de la palabra.
     Empezaremos el curso con una obra de teatro, cuyas partes escritas en poesía nos ayudarán a plantear el problema de las zonas de contacto y conflicto entre amor y erotismo. La obra será Amor de don Perlimplín con Belisa en su jardín, de Federico García Lorca.
  Funcionamiento del curso:
     Utilizaremos tres libros:
Federico García Lorca, Amor de don Perlimplín con Belisa en su jardín, Madrid, Cátedra, 2010.
Lama, Víctor de (ed.), Antología de la poesía amorosa española e hispanoamericana, Madrid, EDAF, 1993. (selección)
Provencio, Pedro (ed.), Antología de la poesía erótica española e hispanoamericana, Madrid: EDAF, 2003. (selección)
     Cada día se asignará un número de textos. Léxico, sintaxis, tropos literarios, ambiente cultural, serán algunos de los elementos que deberán ser estudiados. El análisis discursivo, retórico, ideológico, estético será lo que en la clase se hará a partir de continuo diálogo, grupos de discusión, ejercicios. Cada estudiante deberá estar preparado/a para presentar en clase los textos asignados cada día. Esto significa poder explicar todas las palabras, hablar brevemente sobre la/el poeta, su época, su producción, y proveer una interpretación textual apegada al texto.
     Cada otro martes, se entregará en clase un diario cuyo tema será la comparación entre dos de los poemas vistos en clase. Pueden ser dos poemas amorosos o dos eróticos o uno de cada categoría. El objetivo del ejercicio es analizar e interpretar los dos poemas en comparación. Partiendo de las respuestas a preguntas básicas como ¿quién habla en el texto? ¿a quién le habla? ¿en qué tiempo? ¿en qué espacio? ¿de qué habla? se deben buscar las maneras de expresión del erotismo y del amor en diálogo. Se debe tomar en cuenta que un diálogo puede tener como objetivo la contemplación profunda de un objeto o la polémica sobre el mismo. El diálogo que quiere establecer este ejercicio es de conocimiento: los dos poemas deben volverse uno lente sobre el otro, es decir, medio a través del cual se iluminarán las prácticas estéticas de representación del amor y del erotismo. La extensión mínima del diario será una página; la máxima, dos.
     Cada estudiante preparará dos presentaciones orales a lo largo del curso. Cada presentación será sobre dos poemas. Se tratará de nuevo de entablar comparaciones.
     Un ensayo final de análisis e interpretación se entregará el último día de clases. El tema del ensayo es libre. La extensión mínima del ensayo será de 5 páginas.
Calificación:
Participación: 25%
Diarios: 25%
Presentación: 25%
Ensayo final: 25%
 
Spanish Majors may take Portuguese 102 (a beginning course designed for Spanish speakers) as an elective in the Spanish major .
 
PORTUGUESE
 
PORT 102-02: Intensive Elementary Portuguese (4 hrs) (Spanish Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
MTRF 12:10-1:00 Buttrick 312
An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor. May be counted as an elective toward the major in Spanish.
 
PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese (AXLE: INT)
MWF 11:10-12:00 Calhoun 104
Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language.  The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc).
 
PORT 205: Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature (AXLE: HCA)
TR 1:10-2:25 Furman 302
Marcio.Bahia@Vanderbilt.edu
Portuguese 205 is an introduction to Luso-Brazilian literature through the reading and analysis of literary texts and other cultural productions (such as films and music). Prerequisite: Port 201 or 203.
 
PORT 233: Modern Brazilian Literature (AXLE: HCA)
TR 11:00-12:15 Furman 007
Marcio.Bahia@Vanderbilt.edu
The development of Brazilian literature from the Semana de Arte Moderna to the present. We will explore key aspects of the Brazilian Modernism such as the concept of cultural anthropophagy, as well as the tensions between the national and regional identities.  Novels, short stories, and poetry by masters of the Brazilian literature will include Mario de Andrade (Macunaíma, Pauliceia Desvairada), Oswald de Andrade (Manifesto Antopófago), Vinícius de Moraes (Nova Antologia Poética), Carlos Drummond de Andrade (A Rosa do Povo), Jorge Amado (Gabriela Cravo e Canela), Clarice Lispector (Laços de Família), Guimarães Rosa (Grande Sertão: Veredas), João Cabral de Melo Neto (Morte e Vida Severina), Nelson Rodrigues (A Vida Como Ela É), and Augusto de Campos (Viva Vaia). Finally, we will explore contemporary authors who recently established themselves in the pantheon of Brazilian Literature: Cristovão Tezza (O Filho Eterno, 2007) and Milton Hatoum (Dois Irmãos, 2000 and Cinzas do Norte, 2005).
 
Senior Majors may, with permission of the instructor, take a graduate level course. Registration must be handled separately through the Graduate School.
 
SPAN 336: Self-Writing in Latin America
W 3:10-5:30 Furman 319
Benigno.Trigo@Vanderbilt.edu
We will trace a modern history of self-writing in Latin America beginning with a representative work from the mid-nineteenth century. We will study a number of topics raised by this two-hundred year old practice. Among the topics we will discuss are the construction of the national subject, of the masculine and the feminine subject, of the modern experimental subject, and of the othered or subaltern subject. We will engage questions regarding the nationalist function of autobiography, the traps and promises of testimonial writing, the rhetorical nature of self-writing, the aporias of the Romantic autobiographical subject, the effect of the body on self-writing, and the possibility of writing identity as a transgression and even a separation from familiar cultural values and from the mother tongue. We will study examples of this genre from the following writers: Francisco Manzano, Teresa de la Parra, Elena Poniatowska, Rigoberta Menchú, Juan Rivera Alias Juanito Xtravaganza, and David Caleb Acevedo.
 
SPAN/PORT 338: Studies in Colonial Literature (Span 338 is cross-labelled as PORT 338. You may register under Portuguese 338 if you intend to do the bulk of your work in Portuguese.)
Topic: Comparative Colonialism
T 3:10-5:30 Furman 319
Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@Vanderbilt.edu
This seminar examines a body of texts from three different –albeit coeval– colonial processes within the Early Modern Luso-Hispanic world; it aims at creating a set of categories that enable the critic to compare these colonial experiences and their cultural products, while appreciating the unique traits of each historical process. The cases of Granada, Portuguese Africa and the Indies are under this seminar’s scope. Readings by Gomes Eanes de Zurara, António Vieira, Francisco Núñez Muley, Miguel de Luna, Garcilaso Inca de la Vega, Bartolomé de las Casas and Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala. Some readings in Portuguese are included.
 
SPAN 354: The Politics of Identity in Latino U.S. Literature
M 4:10-6:30 Furman 319
William.Luis@Vanderbilt.edu
This course explores Latinos, people of Hispanic descent born or raised in the United States, who represent the fastest growing population in the United States.  Latino literature is at the vanguard of a new discipline, one that erases differences between borders, cultures, and languages.  The class will focus on the writings of Latinas/Latinos from the four largest groups: Chicanos, Cuban-Americans, Puerto Rican-Americans, and Dominican Americas.  The readings will include Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderland/La Frontera, Junot Díaz's Drown, Gustavo Pérez Firmat's Next Year in Cuba, and Juan Flores's The Diaspora Writes Back.
 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE – FALL 2014
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE – FALL 2014
SPANISH
SPAN 206: Spanish for Business and Economics (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
01 MWF 12:10-1:00
02 MWF 11:10-12:00
Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu
This course provides a thorough foundation in business vocabulary and an overview of business and cultural concepts, emphasizing international business communications skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Focusing on the role of the international manager, the course emphasizes vocabulary related to corporate organization and structure, finance, banking and accounting processes, capital investment, human resources, the production of goods and services, marketing, financial management, and international operations articulated within the geographic and cultural context of the Spanish-speaking world and its place in the global economy. Students are evaluated through essays, tests, oral presentations, final project, and final exam.
SPAN 207: Advanced Conversation (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
01 MWF 2:10-3:00
02 MWF 11:10-12:00
This class is an advanced conversation class that will offer an intra-cultural approach contrasting Spanish, Spanish American and US perspectives. This is a content-based course that focuses primarily on the development of advanced oral language skills. The class format will consist of class discussions, debates, oral presentations, interviews and electronic discussions on contemporary issues. This class is designed for students with a high level of proficiency, especially those returning from a study abroad program. Some of the issues covered in this class will be gender relations, cultural identity, social relations, value systems, religion and education. This class is closed to native speakers.
SPAN 208: Advanced Conversation through Cultural Issues in Film (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
MWF 12:10-1:00
Elena.O.Segovia@Vanderbilt.edu
Advanced conversation course using fifteen films in Spanish, from eight areas of the Spanish-speaking world, as the basis for discussion of linguistic, historic, cultural, and social issues.
This course is not recommended for students coming directly from Spanish 202 or Spanish 203. It is intended for students with a high level of aural/oral proficiency, especially those returning from study abroad. It is not open to students of Hispanic descent/native speakers of Spanish.
All fifteen movies have no subtitles. Students typically need to watch each movie at least twice. Final grade will be based on intense class participation, fifteen critical reviews, two exams, and two portfolio presentations.
SPAN 211: Spanish for the Medical Profession *Service Learning Course (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
MWF 10:10-11:00
Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu
Service-learning based, this advanced conversation course incorporates extensive medical terminology, public policy and cultural competency issues related to health care and the Latino population in the United States. Students are evaluated through essays, tests, oral presentations, service work, and final exam. Prerequisite: 201W and 202; closed to native speakers of Spanish.
SPAN 214: Dialectology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
TR 1:10-2:25
Phillip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu
This course will examine the formation, general characteristics and distinctive features, as well as the geographical extension, of the principal dialectal regions of Spain and Spanish America. Both historical and modern dialects will be considered. Emphasis will be given to phonological variation and to the study of non-standard linguistic features, which will be analyzed vis-à-vis those of modern standard Spanish (Castilian).
SPAN 216: Phonology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
TR 9:35-10:50
Philip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu
Spanish Phonology consists of the study of phonological theory, as well as the practical application of its principles, as applied to the Spanish language. The primary goal of the course is to enable students to improve their pronunciation of Spanish through an analysis of the nature and the production of Spanish sounds and of pronunciation problems frequently experienced by non-native speakers. The course will provide a general understanding of the nature of human language, how speech sounds are produced and function discretely as a component of a linguistic system, and how the sounds of Spanish differ in nature and in distribution from those of English and other languages. Also considered are pronunciation problems due to spelling differences. Both standard and dialectal pronunciations of Spanish will be analyzed.
SPAN 217: Contrastive Analysis of Spanish and English (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
MWF 1:10-2:00
Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu
This course proposes to be a comparative analysis of the phonological, morphological, lexical, semantic and syntactical structures of Spanish and English. We will study the similarities and differences between the linguistic systems of these two languages and try to identify and explain the possible origin of different types of errors common to English-speaking students who study Spanish as a Second Language. We will analyze both oral and written English and Spanish. There will be assigned homework and readings as well as graded individual, pair and group assignments. In addition, there will be three exams. Some readings and course materials located on OAK.
SPAN 220: Languages of Spain (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
MWF 11:10-12:00
Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu
This course will give students a brief overview of the formation of the Spanish languages of the Iberian Peninsula and their development into the modern languages of Castilian, Catalan, and Galician. In addition, we will briefly explore the non-Indo-European language of Basque. We will analyze each respective language by focusing on the differences in the lexical, phonological, and morphosyntactic features and systems. We will discuss issues related to bilingualism, biculturalism and the debate between linguistic theory, actual linguistic reality and the legislation and imposition of official linguistic policy by government and language academies. There will be four quizzes, one group presentation of a linguistic study, one 3 page reflection paper based upon the linguistic study and one final take home exam.
Preparation, active participation and assignments..................15%
4 quizzes (4 x 10%)...............................................................40%
1 group presentation and personal reflection paper (1 x 20%)....20%
1 Final Exam – Take Home (1 x 25%)......................................25%
Readings and course materials located on OAK.
SPAN 221: Spanish Civilization (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
TR 1:10-2:25
Maria.P.Pintane@vanderbilt.edu
An examination of the development of Spanish culture from its origins to the present day in the context of Western civilization. Discussion of the historical background, literary and artistic trends as well as the political and socioeconomic patterns. Not open to students who have attended Vanderbilt in Spain or other abroad programs in Spain.
SPAN 232 Literature of the Spanish Golden Age (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
MWF 12:10-1:00
Heraldo.Falconi@Vanderbilt.edu
This course will survey prose, poetry and drama from early modern Spain. Some of the topics discussed in class will be history and politics, the emergence of popular culture, the continued rise of city life, the definition of religious and secular spheres, and the nature and limits of royal authority in the age of empire. Final grade will be based on class participation, regular reports, exams and papers.
SPAN 233: Spanish Literature from the Enlightenment to 1900 (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
TR 11:00-12:15
Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu
The aim of the course is to survey the history of Spanish literature from 1700 to 1900. In order to illustrate its evolution and its different genres we will read the plays El sí de las niñas by Moratín and Don Alvaro o la fuerza del sino by Angel de Saavedra, Duque de Rivas, the novel Los Pazos de Ulloa by Emilia Pardo Bazán, a two-volume anthology of poetry, and selections of other kinds of texts such as historical accounts, essays, letters, newspaper articles, etc. We will also see two movies, one about Goya in class, and an adaptation of a Realist novel outside of class. Fragments of other movies, musical works and fine arts slides and reproductions will be used also throughout the semester to complement the study of the literary texts. Classes will be taught in Spanish. Each student will give one oral presentation and a write a six-page final paper, both in Spanish.
SPAN 235: Spanish American Literature from the Conquest to 1900 (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
MWF 1:10-2:00
Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@Vanderbilt.edu
Introduction to the main literary trends transplanted to the Indies and their interaction with the Indian legacy in texts by Spanish, creole, mestizo and Indian writers. Readings will cover multiple genres, and these pieces will be linked to the cultural contexts from which they arose. Readings from Columbus, Ercilla, Balbuena, Bernal Díaz, Inca Garcilaso, Balbuena, and Sor Juana, among others.
A selection of texts and images will be available to the students.
Weekly responses (40%)
Oral Presentation (5 %)
Mid term essay (15%)
Final essay (15 %)
Attendance and Participation (25%)
SPAN 246: Don Quixote (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
TR 1:10-2:25
Edward.H.Friedman@Vanderbilt.edu
The course includes a close reading of Cervantes's Don Quijote, the most famous novel written in Spanish and one of the classic novels of all times. We will study the complete text of Don Quijote, published in two parts, in 1605 and 1615, in addition to a selection of critical studies that reflect multiple approaches to the novel. Students will write a number of short papers and abstracts, and there will be two tests. The course will be given in Spanish.
Texts:
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote (Lathrop ed.)
Don Quijote Dictionary (Lathrop)
Carroll B. Johnson, Don Quixote: The Quest for Modern Fiction
+ selected critical studies and Woody Allen film The Purple Rose of Cairo
Evaluation will be based on class participation and the written exercises (50%) and on the two tests (50%). The course requires that students read the assigned materials prior to class meetings, so that they may contribute to class discussions. It should be understood that the course will involve a significant amount of work, but, if all goes according to plan, the benefits of that work ‒ exploration of new ("novel") ideas and enjoyment ‒ will make the effort worthwhile.
SPAN 260: Development of the Short Story (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
TR 2:35-3:50
Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu
Short stories written by Latin American authors in the period 1945-1965 have held a special place in the history of Latin American narrative and in the history of global cinema. Some of the most important film directors in the world have adapted for the screen short stories by Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, and Juan Rulfo. In this course we shall be reading some of these stories and watching their cinematic adaptations. Outside of class, students shall read the assigned stories and watch the assigned films at scheduled showings, or on their own; in class, we shall analyze the stories and the films. Guiding our analyses shall be questions such as the following: Why are film directors drawn to authors and short stories from a particular period and region? How is the written metaphor central to the cinematic medium? What is it about the short story as a genre that appeals to directors? What distinguishes the literary narrative from the cinematic narrative? Requirements: 6 feedback reports (2 pages each) on the short stories and films; a midterm; active participation in group and individual discussions.
SPAN 294-01: Special Topics in Hispanic Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: none)
Topic: Celebration and Play in Latin American Literature
MWF 12:10-1:00
Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@vanderbilt.edu
A comparative analysis of the celebration phenomenon as a tool to evaluate the integration of those elements that constitute the identity of three Latin American regions: Mexico, the Andean region and the Caribbean. Colonial and contemporary texts, paintings and film will be the basis for class and theoretical discussion. Readings in the works of Octavio Paz, Elena Garro, José María Arguedas, Guillermo Cabrera Infante and José Lezama Lima, among others. Students will be required to write three analytical essays (60%), to actively engage in class participation (30%), and to take four pop up quizzes (10%).
PORTUGUESE
Spanish Majors may take Portuguese 102 (a beginning course designed for students who already know Spanish, offered every semester) as an elective in the Spanish major (but not the minor).
PORT 102: Intensive Elementary Portuguese (Elective in Spanish Major; AXLE: INT)
01 MTRF 11:10-12:00
02 MTRF 12:10-1:00
An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor. NOTE: May be counted as 3 hours of elective toward the Spanish major. [4 hours]
PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese (AXLE: INT)
MWF 11:10-12:00
Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu
Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 100B, 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language. The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc).
PORT 203: Brazilian Pop Culture (AXLE: INT)
MWF 1:10-2:00
Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu
Portuguese through Pop Culture is a content-based course with emphasis on Brazilian Pop Culture as a tool for acquiring advanced vocabulary, training conversational skills, and developing writing proficiency. This course seeks to explore various aspects of Brazilian culture while practicing advanced level grammar topics, discussing the readings, and engaging in the process of writing.
PORT 232: Brazilian Literature through the Nineteenth Century
TR 11:00-12:15
Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
Main literary trends, principal writers and works of Brazilian literature, from colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Study of the works of Gregório de Matos, Antônio Vieira, Gonçalves Dias, Alencar, Machado de Assis, and João da Cruz e Sousa.
PORT 205: Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature
TR 2:35-3:50
Emanuelle.Oliveira@Vanderbilt.edu
Portuguese 205 is an introduction to Luso-Brazilian literature through the reading and analysis of literary texts and other cultural productions (such as films and music). Prerequisite: Port 201 or 203.
PORT 232: Brazilian Literature through the Nineteenth Century
TR 11:00-12:15
Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
Main literary trends, principal writers and works of Brazilian literature, from colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Study of the works of Gregório de Matos, Antônio Vieira, Gonçalves Dias, Alencar, Machado de Assis, and João da Cruz e Sousa.
Senior Majors may, with permission of the instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies, take a graduate level course. Registration must be handled separately through the Graduate School.
SPAN 301: Literary Analysis and Theory (Also listed as Portuguese 301)
F 1:10-3:30
Christina.Karageorgou@Vanderbilt.edu
The purpose of this course is to provide some of the principles and basic knowledge that may become departing points for critical approaches to literary texts. The knowledge of literary theory requires a fundamental discernment from criticism and history, namely from using a set of applicable tools, instrumental knowledge, and/or historical views on literature in order to interpret a text. Literary theory precedes any analysis and is the basis for all critical readings. Whether consciously or not, every interpretive reading presupposes a set of principles, the demarcation of a departing space, the perspective from which critical discourse is emitted. This semester, Literary Theory and Analysis aims at providing the starting point for a personal trajectory of discovery, this of a partial yet not for this less solid knowledge of the kind of problems addressed over time by literary theorists and trends of thought. No course or series of courses could cover the entire field of literary theory. Such a conviction drives me to offer a selected series of texts that show approaches to the definition of the literary in terms of aesthetics, a topic which I consider a cornerstone for any approach to literature. What has been thought of as literature, and what is the relation of the corpus of literary texts with the field of aesthetics? These are the two fundamental questions answered by the series of texts chosen in this course.
SPAN 344: The Baroque
T 3:10-5:30
Edward.H.Friedman@Vanderbilt.edu
The course will offer a survey of baroque literature and culture in Spain. The selections will include narrative, dramatic, and poetic texts, as well as critical studies. We will discuss the use of the term baroque: its origins, manifestations, and polemics regarding baroque style. We will consider the distinctions between culteranismo and conceptismo; contrasts among the categories of Renaissance, mannerist, and baroque art; the baroque in Europe at large; and the neobaroque. Students will write short response papers, contribute to class dialogue, and develop a seminar paper on a Spanish baroque work.
The primary texts will include
Lazarillo de Tormes
Francisco de Quevedo, La vida del buscón
Miguel de Cervantes, La fuerza de la sangre, La española inglesa
María de Zayas, La inocencia castigada, El jardín engañoso
Tirso de Molina, El vergonzoso en palacio
Pedro Calderón de la Barca, La dama duende
Elias L. Rivers, ed., Renaissance and Baroque Poetry of Spain (selections by Juan Boscán, Garcilaso de la Vega, Lope de Vega, Luis de Góngora, Francisco de Quevedo, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz)
+ selected critical studies
Evaluation will be based on written exercises and participation (70%) and the seminar paper (30%).
SPAN 351: Comparative Methodology (Also listed as PORT 351 - Sign up for Port 351 if you intend to do all your written work and oral presentations in Portuguese.)
TR 1:10-2:25
Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
Comparative Methodology deals with basic methodological questions: What is Comparative Literature and how does one define it? How are Spanish and Portuguese reinvigorating the discipline? How and why is the combined Ph.D. program in Spanish and Portuguese an inherently comparative program? What possibilities does it offer? How does it prepare someone for connecting Latin American literature to inter-American literary study? What constitutes a successful comparative paper or essay? What elements must it have? What are the problems that a comparative study must avoid or resolve if it is to be successful? The course emphasizes connecting one's particular interests to the possibilities presented by the comparative method. In addition to regular presentations, a final, formal oral presentation is required as is a final comparative research paper.
SPAN 362: Realist Novel of the Nineteenth Century
R 3:10-5:30 Furman
Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu
The seminar will explore the Spanish realist novel through the reading of four primary texts: La Regenta by Leopoldo Alas "Clarín," Fortunata y Jacinta by Benito Pérez Galdós, Los Pazos de Ulloa by Emilia Pardo Bazán and Insolación by the same author. We will also read a selection of documents on the poetics of the realist novel and a set of articles about recent developments in the criticism of the primary texts read and of the period as a whole. Some of the topics to be discussed will be: the problematic of representation, the obsession with the fabrication of people, the politics of gender and sex, the relation of the novel with other art forms and media, the historical conditions of existence of the realist novel, and the social function of literature, its actual or intended performative value.
SPAN 375: Seminar: Studies in Trans-Atlantic Literature and Culture.
Topic: Transatlantic Enlightenments
W 3:10-5:30
Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu
Rigorously interdisciplinary, this survey is an introduction to the major trends and authors of the Hispanic 18th century on both sides of the Atlantic. Readings include novels by the Mexican journalist and novelist J.J. Fernández de Lizardi, La Quijotita y su prima o la educación de las mujeres, and the Portuguese poet and novelist Francisco Botelho de Moraes, Historia de las cuevas de Salamanca. Poetry will also be surveyed, including canti from epics by Francisco Ruiz de León, La Hernandía, and Pedro de Peralta Barnuevo, Lima fundada o la Conquista del Perú. Prose-readings will include selections from: Ignacio de Luzán, Poética; Padre Benito Feijoo y Montenegro, Teatro crítico and Cartas eruditas; newspapers and literary journals such as Mercurio Peruano, Gaceta de México, Gaceta de Madrid, Diario de los literatos de España; Joaquín Antonio de Basarás, Origen, costumbres y estado presente de mexicanos y filipinos Pedro Rodríguez Campomanes, Discurso sobre la educación popular and Discurso sobre el fomento de la industria; Antonio de Ulloa, Noticias americanas o Entretenimientos fisico-históricos sobre la América meridional y la septentrional oriental; Mario Cicala, Descripción de la Real Audiencia de Quito; Pedro Murillo Velarde, Geografía de México y de las Filipinas and Curso de derecho canónico hispano indiano; Urrutia y Montoya, Teatro historico, jurídico y político militar de la Isla Fernandina de Cuba; Hipólito Unanue, Escritos científicos; José Antonio de Villaseñor y Sánchez, Teatro americano: Descripción general de los reinos y provincias de la Nueva España. We shall also address briefly both music and painting. Secondary readings include: Dorinda Outram, The Enlightenment, and Karen Stolley, Domesticating Empire. Paper draft (midterm), book review, oral presentation, and final paper required.
PORT 351: Comparative Methodology (Cross-listed as SPAN 351 - Sign up for Port 351 if you intend to do all your written work and oral presentations in Portuguese.)
TR 1:10-2:25
Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
Comparative Methodology deals with basic methodological questions: What is Comparative Literature and how does one define it? How are Spanish and Portuguese reinvigorating the discipline? How and why is the combined Ph.D. program in Spanish and Portuguese an inherently comparative program? What possibilities does it offer? How does it prepare someone for connecting Latin American literature to inter-American literary study? What constitutes a successful comparative paper or essay? What elements must it have? What are the problems that a comparative study must avoid or resolve if it is to be successful? The course emphasizes connecting one's particular interests to the possibilities presented by the comparative method. In addition to regular presentations, a final, formal oral presentation is required as is a final comparative research paper.
 
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