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http://www.vanderbilt.edu/catalogs/undergrad/UGAD.pdf

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE – FALL 2014

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE – FALL 2014

SPANISH

SPAN 206: Spanish for Business and Economics (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
01 MWF 12:10-1:00
02 MWF 11:10-12:00
Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu
This course provides a thorough foundation in business vocabulary and an overview of business and cultural concepts, emphasizing international business communications skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Focusing on the role of the international manager, the course emphasizes vocabulary related to corporate organization and structure, finance, banking and accounting processes, capital investment, human resources, the production of goods and services, marketing, financial management, and international operations articulated within the geographic and cultural context of the Spanish-speaking world and its place in the global economy. Students are evaluated through essays, tests, oral presentations, final project, and final exam.

SPAN 207: Advanced Conversation (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
01 MWF 2:10-3:00
02 MWF 11:10-12:00
This class is an advanced conversation class that will offer an intra-cultural approach contrasting Spanish, Spanish American and US perspectives. This is a content-based course that focuses primarily on the development of advanced oral language skills. The class format will consist of class discussions, debates, oral presentations, interviews and electronic discussions on contemporary issues. This class is designed for students with a high level of proficiency, especially those returning from a study abroad program. Some of the issues covered in this class will be gender relations, cultural identity, social relations, value systems, religion and education. This class is closed to native speakers.

SPAN 208: Advanced Conversation through Cultural Issues in Film (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
MWF 12:10-1:00
Elena.O.Segovia@Vanderbilt.edu
Advanced conversation course using fifteen films in Spanish, from eight areas of the Spanish-speaking world, as the basis for discussion of linguistic, historic, cultural, and social issues.
This course is not recommended for students coming directly from Spanish 202 or Spanish 203. It is intended for students with a high level of aural/oral proficiency, especially those returning from study abroad. It is not open to students of Hispanic descent/native speakers of Spanish.
All fifteen movies have no subtitles. Students typically need to watch each movie at least twice. Final grade will be based on intense class participation, fifteen critical reviews, two exams, and two portfolio presentations.

SPAN 211: Spanish for the Medical Profession *Service Learning Course (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
MWF 10:10-11:00
Lori.Catanzaro@Vanderbilt.edu
Service-learning based, this advanced conversation course incorporates extensive medical terminology, public policy and cultural competency issues related to health care and the Latino population in the United States. Students are evaluated through essays, tests, oral presentations, service work, and final exam. Prerequisite: 201W and 202; closed to native speakers of Spanish.

SPAN 214: Dialectology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
TR 1:10-2:25
Phillip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu
This course will examine the formation, general characteristics and distinctive features, as well as the geographical extension, of the principal dialectal regions of Spain and Spanish America. Both historical and modern dialects will be considered. Emphasis will be given to phonological variation and to the study of non-standard linguistic features, which will be analyzed vis-à-vis those of modern standard Spanish (Castilian).

SPAN 216: Phonology (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
TR 9:35-10:50
Philip.D.Rasico@Vanderbilt.edu
Spanish Phonology consists of the study of phonological theory, as well as the practical application of its principles, as applied to the Spanish language. The primary goal of the course is to enable students to improve their pronunciation of Spanish through an analysis of the nature and the production of Spanish sounds and of pronunciation problems frequently experienced by non-native speakers. The course will provide a general understanding of the nature of human language, how speech sounds are produced and function discretely as a component of a linguistic system, and how the sounds of Spanish differ in nature and in distribution from those of English and other languages. Also considered are pronunciation problems due to spelling differences. Both standard and dialectal pronunciations of Spanish will be analyzed.

SPAN 217: Contrastive Analysis of Spanish and English (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
MWF 1:10-2:00
Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu
This course proposes to be a comparative analysis of the phonological, morphological, lexical, semantic and syntactical structures of Spanish and English. We will study the similarities and differences between the linguistic systems of these two languages and try to identify and explain the possible origin of different types of errors common to English-speaking students who study Spanish as a Second Language. We will analyze both oral and written English and Spanish. There will be assigned homework and readings as well as graded individual, pair and group assignments. In addition, there will be three exams. Some readings and course materials located on OAK.

SPAN 220: Languages of Spain (Major: Linguistics; AXLE: SBS)
MWF 11:10-12:00
Cynthia.Wasick@Vanderbilt.edu
This course will give students a brief overview of the formation of the Spanish languages of the Iberian Peninsula and their development into the modern languages of Castilian, Catalan, and Galician. In addition, we will briefly explore the non-Indo-European language of Basque. We will analyze each respective language by focusing on the differences in the lexical, phonological, and morphosyntactic features and systems. We will discuss issues related to bilingualism, biculturalism and the debate between linguistic theory, actual linguistic reality and the legislation and imposition of official linguistic policy by government and language academies. There will be four quizzes, one group presentation of a linguistic study, one 3 page reflection paper based upon the linguistic study and one final take home exam.
Preparation, active participation and assignments..................15%
4 quizzes (4 x 10%)...............................................................40%
1 group presentation and personal reflection paper (1 x 20%)....20%
1 Final Exam – Take Home (1 x 25%)......................................25%
Readings and course materials located on OAK.

SPAN 221: Spanish Civilization (Major: Elective; AXLE: INT)
TR 1:10-2:25
Maria.P.Pintane@vanderbilt.edu
An examination of the development of Spanish culture from its origins to the present day in the context of Western civilization. Discussion of the historical background, literary and artistic trends as well as the political and socioeconomic patterns. Not open to students who have attended Vanderbilt in Spain or other abroad programs in Spain.

SPAN 232 Literature of the Spanish Golden Age (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
MWF 12:10-1:00
Heraldo.Falconi@Vanderbilt.edu
This course will survey prose, poetry and drama from early modern Spain. Some of the topics discussed in class will be history and politics, the emergence of popular culture, the continued rise of city life, the definition of religious and secular spheres, and the nature and limits of royal authority in the age of empire. Final grade will be based on class participation, regular reports, exams and papers.

SPAN 233: Spanish Literature from the Enlightenment to 1900 (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
TR 11:00-12:15
Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu
The aim of the course is to survey the history of Spanish literature from 1700 to 1900. In order to illustrate its evolution and its different genres we will read the plays El sí de las niñas by Moratín and Don Alvaro o la fuerza del sino by Angel de Saavedra, Duque de Rivas, the novel Los Pazos de Ulloa by Emilia Pardo Bazán, a two-volume anthology of poetry, and selections of other kinds of texts such as historical accounts, essays, letters, newspaper articles, etc. We will also see two movies, one about Goya in class, and an adaptation of a Realist novel outside of class. Fragments of other movies, musical works and fine arts slides and reproductions will be used also throughout the semester to complement the study of the literary texts. Classes will be taught in Spanish. Each student will give one oral presentation and a write a six-page final paper, both in Spanish.

SPAN 235: Spanish American Literature from the Conquest to 1900 (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
MWF 1:10-2:00
Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@Vanderbilt.edu
Introduction to the main literary trends transplanted to the Indies and their interaction with the Indian legacy in texts by Spanish, creole, mestizo and Indian writers. Readings will cover multiple genres, and these pieces will be linked to the cultural contexts from which they arose. Readings from Columbus, Ercilla, Balbuena, Bernal Díaz, Inca Garcilaso, Balbuena, and Sor Juana, among others.
A selection of texts and images will be available to the students.
Weekly responses (40%)
Oral Presentation (5 %)
Mid term essay (15%)
Final essay (15 %)
Attendance and Participation (25%)

SPAN 246: Don Quixote (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
TR 1:10-2:25
Edward.H.Friedman@Vanderbilt.edu
The course includes a close reading of Cervantes's Don Quijote, the most famous novel written in Spanish and one of the classic novels of all times. We will study the complete text of Don Quijote, published in two parts, in 1605 and 1615, in addition to a selection of critical studies that reflect multiple approaches to the novel. Students will write a number of short papers and abstracts, and there will be two tests. The course will be given in Spanish.
Texts:
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote (Lathrop ed.)
Don Quijote Dictionary (Lathrop)
Carroll B. Johnson, Don Quixote: The Quest for Modern Fiction
+ selected critical studies and Woody Allen film The Purple Rose of Cairo
Evaluation will be based on class participation and the written exercises (50%) and on the two tests (50%). The course requires that students read the assigned materials prior to class meetings, so that they may contribute to class discussions. It should be understood that the course will involve a significant amount of work, but, if all goes according to plan, the benefits of that work ‒ exploration of new ("novel") ideas and enjoyment ‒ will make the effort worthwhile.

SPAN 260: Development of the Short Story (Major: Literature; AXLE: HCA)
TR 2:35-3:50
Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu
Short stories written by Latin American authors in the period 1945-1965 have held a special place in the history of Latin American narrative and in the history of global cinema. Some of the most important film directors in the world have adapted for the screen short stories by Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, and Juan Rulfo. In this course we shall be reading some of these stories and watching their cinematic adaptations. Outside of class, students shall read the assigned stories and watch the assigned films at scheduled showings, or on their own; in class, we shall analyze the stories and the films. Guiding our analyses shall be questions such as the following: Why are film directors drawn to authors and short stories from a particular period and region? How is the written metaphor central to the cinematic medium? What is it about the short story as a genre that appeals to directors? What distinguishes the literary narrative from the cinematic narrative? Requirements: 6 feedback reports (2 pages each) on the short stories and films; a midterm; active participation in group and individual discussions.

SPAN 294-01: Special Topics in Hispanic Literature (Major: Literature; AXLE: none)
Topic: Celebration and Play in Latin American Literature
MWF 12:10-1:00
Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@vanderbilt.edu
A comparative analysis of the celebration phenomenon as a tool to evaluate the integration of those elements that constitute the identity of three Latin American regions: Mexico, the Andean region and the Caribbean. Colonial and contemporary texts, paintings and film will be the basis for class and theoretical discussion. Readings in the works of Octavio Paz, Elena Garro, José María Arguedas, Guillermo Cabrera Infante and José Lezama Lima, among others. Students will be required to write three analytical essays (60%), to actively engage in class participation (30%), and to take four pop up quizzes (10%).

PORTUGUESE

Spanish Majors may take Portuguese 102 (a beginning course designed for students who already know Spanish, offered every semester) as an elective in the Spanish major (but not the minor).

PORT 102: Intensive Elementary Portuguese (Elective in Spanish Major; AXLE: INT)
01 MTRF 11:10-12:00
02 MTRF 12:10-1:00
An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor. NOTE: May be counted as 3 hours of elective toward the Spanish major. [4 hours]

PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese (AXLE: INT)
MWF 11:10-12:00
Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu
Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 100B, 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language. The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc).

PORT 203: Brazilian Pop Culture (AXLE: INT)
MWF 1:10-2:00
Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu
Portuguese through Pop Culture is a content-based course with emphasis on Brazilian Pop Culture as a tool for acquiring advanced vocabulary, training conversational skills, and developing writing proficiency. This course seeks to explore various aspects of Brazilian culture while practicing advanced level grammar topics, discussing the readings, and engaging in the process of writing.

PORT 232: Brazilian Literature through the Nineteenth Century
TR 11:00-12:15
Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
Main literary trends, principal writers and works of Brazilian literature, from colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Study of the works of Gregório de Matos, Antônio Vieira, Gonçalves Dias, Alencar, Machado de Assis, and João da Cruz e Sousa.

PORT 205: Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature
TR 2:35-3:50
Emanuelle.Oliveira@Vanderbilt.edu
Portuguese 205 is an introduction to Luso-Brazilian literature through the reading and analysis of literary texts and other cultural productions (such as films and music). Prerequisite: Port 201 or 203.

PORT 232: Brazilian Literature through the Nineteenth Century
TR 11:00-12:15
Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
Main literary trends, principal writers and works of Brazilian literature, from colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Study of the works of Gregório de Matos, Antônio Vieira, Gonçalves Dias, Alencar, Machado de Assis, and João da Cruz e Sousa.

Senior Majors may, with permission of the instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies, take a graduate level course. Registration must be handled separately through the Graduate School.

SPAN 301: Literary Analysis and Theory (Also listed as Portuguese 301)
F 1:10-3:30
Christina.Karageorgou@Vanderbilt.edu
The purpose of this course is to provide some of the principles and basic knowledge that may become departing points for critical approaches to literary texts. The knowledge of literary theory requires a fundamental discernment from criticism and history, namely from using a set of applicable tools, instrumental knowledge, and/or historical views on literature in order to interpret a text. Literary theory precedes any analysis and is the basis for all critical readings. Whether consciously or not, every interpretive reading presupposes a set of principles, the demarcation of a departing space, the perspective from which critical discourse is emitted. This semester, Literary Theory and Analysis aims at providing the starting point for a personal trajectory of discovery, this of a partial yet not for this less solid knowledge of the kind of problems addressed over time by literary theorists and trends of thought. No course or series of courses could cover the entire field of literary theory. Such a conviction drives me to offer a selected series of texts that show approaches to the definition of the literary in terms of aesthetics, a topic which I consider a cornerstone for any approach to literature. What has been thought of as literature, and what is the relation of the corpus of literary texts with the field of aesthetics? These are the two fundamental questions answered by the series of texts chosen in this course.

SPAN 344: The Baroque
T 3:10-5:30
Edward.H.Friedman@Vanderbilt.edu
The course will offer a survey of baroque literature and culture in Spain. The selections will include narrative, dramatic, and poetic texts, as well as critical studies. We will discuss the use of the term baroque: its origins, manifestations, and polemics regarding baroque style. We will consider the distinctions between culteranismo and conceptismo; contrasts among the categories of Renaissance, mannerist, and baroque art; the baroque in Europe at large; and the neobaroque. Students will write short response papers, contribute to class dialogue, and develop a seminar paper on a Spanish baroque work.
The primary texts will include
Lazarillo de Tormes
Francisco de Quevedo, La vida del buscón
Miguel de Cervantes, La fuerza de la sangre, La española inglesa
María de Zayas, La inocencia castigada, El jardín engañoso
Tirso de Molina, El vergonzoso en palacio
Pedro Calderón de la Barca, La dama duende
Elias L. Rivers, ed., Renaissance and Baroque Poetry of Spain (selections by Juan Boscán, Garcilaso de la Vega, Lope de Vega, Luis de Góngora, Francisco de Quevedo, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz)
+ selected critical studies
Evaluation will be based on written exercises and participation (70%) and the seminar paper (30%).

SPAN 351: Comparative Methodology (Also listed as PORT 351 - Sign up for Port 351 if you intend to do all your written work and oral presentations in Portuguese.)
TR 1:10-2:25
Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
Comparative Methodology deals with basic methodological questions: What is Comparative Literature and how does one define it? How are Spanish and Portuguese reinvigorating the discipline? How and why is the combined Ph.D. program in Spanish and Portuguese an inherently comparative program? What possibilities does it offer? How does it prepare someone for connecting Latin American literature to inter-American literary study? What constitutes a successful comparative paper or essay? What elements must it have? What are the problems that a comparative study must avoid or resolve if it is to be successful? The course emphasizes connecting one's particular interests to the possibilities presented by the comparative method. In addition to regular presentations, a final, formal oral presentation is required as is a final comparative research paper.

SPAN 362: Realist Novel of the Nineteenth Century
R 3:10-5:30 Furman
Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu
The seminar will explore the Spanish realist novel through the reading of four primary texts: La Regenta by Leopoldo Alas "Clarín," Fortunata y Jacinta by Benito Pérez Galdós, Los Pazos de Ulloa by Emilia Pardo Bazán and Insolación by the same author. We will also read a selection of documents on the poetics of the realist novel and a set of articles about recent developments in the criticism of the primary texts read and of the period as a whole. Some of the topics to be discussed will be: the problematic of representation, the obsession with the fabrication of people, the politics of gender and sex, the relation of the novel with other art forms and media, the historical conditions of existence of the realist novel, and the social function of literature, its actual or intended performative value.

SPAN 375: Seminar: Studies in Trans-Atlantic Literature and Culture.
Topic: Transatlantic Enlightenments
W 3:10-5:30
Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu
Rigorously interdisciplinary, this survey is an introduction to the major trends and authors of the Hispanic 18th century on both sides of the Atlantic. Readings include novels by the Mexican journalist and novelist J.J. Fernández de Lizardi, La Quijotita y su prima o la educación de las mujeres, and the Portuguese poet and novelist Francisco Botelho de Moraes, Historia de las cuevas de Salamanca. Poetry will also be surveyed, including canti from epics by Francisco Ruiz de León, La Hernandía, and Pedro de Peralta Barnuevo, Lima fundada o la Conquista del Perú. Prose-readings will include selections from: Ignacio de Luzán, Poética; Padre Benito Feijoo y Montenegro, Teatro crítico and Cartas eruditas; newspapers and literary journals such as Mercurio Peruano, Gaceta de México, Gaceta de Madrid, Diario de los literatos de España; Joaquín Antonio de Basarás, Origen, costumbres y estado presente de mexicanos y filipinos Pedro Rodríguez Campomanes, Discurso sobre la educación popular and Discurso sobre el fomento de la industria; Antonio de Ulloa, Noticias americanas o Entretenimientos fisico-históricos sobre la América meridional y la septentrional oriental; Mario Cicala, Descripción de la Real Audiencia de Quito; Pedro Murillo Velarde, Geografía de México y de las Filipinas and Curso de derecho canónico hispano indiano; Urrutia y Montoya, Teatro historico, jurídico y político militar de la Isla Fernandina de Cuba; Hipólito Unanue, Escritos científicos; José Antonio de Villaseñor y Sánchez, Teatro americano: Descripción general de los reinos y provincias de la Nueva España. We shall also address briefly both music and painting. Secondary readings include: Dorinda Outram, The Enlightenment, and Karen Stolley, Domesticating Empire. Paper draft (midterm), book review, oral presentation, and final paper required.

PORT 351: Comparative Methodology (Cross-listed as SPAN 351 - Sign up for Port 351 if you intend to do all your written work and oral presentations in Portuguese.)
TR 1:10-2:25
Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu
Comparative Methodology deals with basic methodological questions: What is Comparative Literature and how does one define it? How are Spanish and Portuguese reinvigorating the discipline? How and why is the combined Ph.D. program in Spanish and Portuguese an inherently comparative program? What possibilities does it offer? How does it prepare someone for connecting Latin American literature to inter-American literary study? What constitutes a successful comparative paper or essay? What elements must it have? What are the problems that a comparative study must avoid or resolve if it is to be successful? The course emphasizes connecting one's particular interests to the possibilities presented by the comparative method. In addition to regular presentations, a final, formal oral presentation is required as is a final comparative research paper.

 

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