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Current Graduate Courses

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For the Graduate School Catalog please follow this link:

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/catalogs/grad/graduate.pdf#courses

GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONSSPANISH AND PORTUGUESE SPRING 2015

                                     
                     

 

SPAN 336: Self-Writing in Latin America

W 3:10-5:30 Furman 319

Benigno.Trigo@Vanderbilt.edu

We will trace a modern history of self-writing in Latin America beginning with a representative work from the mid-nineteenth century. We will study a number of topics raised by this two-hundred year old practice. Among the topics we will discuss are the construction of the national subject, of the masculine and the feminine subject, of the modern experimental subject, and of the othered or subaltern subject. We will engage questions regarding the nationalist function of autobiography, the traps and promises of testimonial writing, the rhetorical nature of self-writing, the aporias of the Romantic autobiographical subject, the effect of the body on self-writing, and the possibility of writing identity as a transgression and even a separation from familiar cultural values and from the mother tongue. We will study examples of this genre from the following writers: Francisco Manzano, Teresa de la Parra, Elena Poniatowska, Rigoberta Menchú, Juan Rivera Alias Juanito Xtravaganza, and David Caleb Acevedo.

 

SPAN/PORT 338: Studies in Colonial Literature (Span 338 is cross-labelled as PORT 338. You may register under Portuguese 338 if you intend to do the bulk of your work in Portuguese.)

Topic: Comparative Colonialism

T 3:10-5:30 Furman 319

Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@Vanderbilt.edu

This seminar examines a body of texts from three different –albeit coeval– colonial processes within the Early Modern Luso-Hispanic world; it aims at creating a set of categories that enable the critic to compare these colonial experiences and their cultural products, while appreciating the unique traits of each historical process. The cases of Granada, Portuguese Africa and the Indies are under this seminar’s scope. Readings by Gomes Eanes de Zurara, António Vieira, Francisco Núñez Muley, Miguel de Luna, Garcilaso Inca de la Vega, Bartolomé de las Casas and Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala. Some readings in Portuguese are included.

 

SPAN 354: The Politics of Identity in Latino U.S. Literature

M 4:10-6:30 Furman 319

William.Luis@Vanderbilt.edu

This course explores Latinos, people of Hispanic descent born or raised in the United States, who represent the fastest growing population in the United States.  Latino literature is at the vanguard of a new discipline, one that erases differences between borders, cultures, and languages.  The class will focus on the writings of Latinas/Latinos from the four largest groups: Chicanos, Cuban-Americans, Puerto Rican-Americans, and Dominican Americas.  The readings will include Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderland/La Frontera, Junot Díaz's Drown, Gustavo Pérez Firmat's Next Year in Cuba, and Juan Flores's The Diaspora Writes Back.

 

PORT 102-02: Intensive Elementary Portuguese (as official audit only)

MTRF 12:10-1:00 Buttrick 312

An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor.

 

PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese (AXLE: INT)

MWF 11:10-12:00 Calhoun 104

Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language.  The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc.).

 

PORT 205: Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature (AXLE: HCA)

TR 1:10-2:25 Furman 319

Marcio.Bahia@Vanderbilt.edu

Portuguese 205 is an introduction to Luso-Brazilian literature through the reading and analysis of literary texts and other cultural productions (such as films and music). Prerequisite: Port 201 or 203.

 

PORT 233: Modern Brazilian Literature (AXLE: HCA)

TR 11:00-12:15 Furman 319

Marcio.Bahia@Vanderbilt.edu

The development of Brazilian literature from the Semana de Arte Moderna to the present. We will explore key aspects of the Brazilian Modernism such as the concept of cultural anthropophagy, as well as the tensions between the national and regional identities.  Novels, short stories, and poetry by masters of the Brazilian literature will include Mario de Andrade (Macunaíma, Pauliceia Desvairada), Oswald de Andrade (Manifesto Antopófago), Vinícius de Moraes (Nova Antologia Poética), Carlos Drummond de Andrade (A Rosa do Povo), Jorge Amado (Gabriela Cravo e Canela), Clarice Lispector (Laços de Família), Guimarães Rosa (Grande Sertão: Veredas), João Cabral de Melo Neto (Morte e Vida Severina), Nelson Rodrigues (A Vida Como Ela É), and Augusto de Campos (Viva Vaia). Finally, we will explore contemporary authors who recently established themselves in the pantheon of Brazilian Literature: Cristovão Tezza (O Filho Eterno, 2007) and Milton Hatoum (Dois Irmãos, 2000 and Cinzas do Norte, 2005).


GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – FALL 2014

SPANISH

SPAN 301 Literary Theory and Analysis (also listed as Port 301)

F 1:10-3:30

Christina.Karageorgou@vanderbilt.edu

The purpose of this course is to provide some of the principles and basic knowledge that may become departing points for critical approaches to literary texts. The knowledge of literary theory requires a fundamental discernment from criticism and history, namely from using a set of applicable tools, instrumental knowledge, and/or historical views on literature in order to interpret a text. Literary theory precedes any analysis and is the basis for all critical readings. Whether consciously or not, every interpretive reading presupposes a set of principles, the demarcation of a departing space, the perspective from which critical discourse is emitted. This semester, Literary Theory and Analysis aims at providing the starting point for a personal trajectory of discovery, this of a partial yet not for this less solid knowledge of the kind of problems addressed over time by literary theorists and trends of thought. No course or series of courses could cover the entire field of literary theory. Such a conviction drives me to offer a selected series of texts that show approaches to the definition of the literary in terms of aesthetics, a topic which I consider a cornerstone for any approach to literature. What has been thought of as literature, and what is the relation of the corpus of literary texts with the field of aesthetics? These are the two fundamental questions answered by the series of texts chosen in this course.

SPAN 310: Foreign Language Learning and Teaching (also listed as Port 310)

M 3:10-5:40

Virginia.M.Scott@Vanderbilt.edu

Principles and practices of teaching a second language, with concentration on recent interactive and communicative models of foreign language instruction. Goals of the course are 1) to introduce principles of Second Language Acquisition and learning, 2) to critically read relevant literature in the area(s), and 3) to develop FL instructor's awareness through reflective and critical thinking. Classroom observations, journal writing, development of materials, and a small action research project are expected. Required of all entering teaching assistants.

SPAN 344: The Baroque

T 3:10-5:30

Edward.H.Friedman@Vanderbilt.edu

The course will offer a survey of baroque literature and culture in Spain. The selections will include narrative, dramatic, and poetic texts, as well as critical studies. We will discuss the use of the term baroque: its origins, manifestations, and polemics regarding baroque style. We will consider the distinctions between culteranismo and conceptismo; contrasts among the categories of Renaissance, mannerist, and baroque art; the baroque in Europe at large; and the neobaroque. Students will write short response papers, contribute to class dialogue, and develop a seminar paper on a Spanish baroque work.

The primary texts will include

Lazarillo de Tormes

Francisco de Quevedo, La vida del buscón

Miguel de Cervantes, La fuerza de la sangre, La española inglesa

María de Zayas, La inocencia castigada, El jardín engañoso

Tirso de Molina, El vergonzoso en palacio

Pedro Calderón de la Barca, La dama duende

Elias L. Rivers, ed., Renaissance and Baroque Poetry of Spain (selections by Juan Boscán, Garcilaso de la Vega, Lope de Vega, Luis de Góngora, Francisco de Quevedo, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz)

+ selected critical studies

Evaluation will be based on written exercises and participation (70%) and the seminar paper (30%).

SPAN 351: Comparative Methodology (Also listed as PORT 351)

TR 1:10-2:25

Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu

Comparative Methodology deals with basic methodological questions: What is Comparative Literature and how does one define it? How are Spanish and Portuguese reinvigorating the discipline? How and why is the combined Ph.D. program in Spanish and Portuguese an inherently comparative program? What possibilities does it offer? How does it prepare someone for connecting Latin American literature to inter-American literary study? What constitutes a successful comparative paper or essay? What elements must it have? What are the problems that a comparative study must avoid or resolve if it is to be successful? The course emphasizes connecting one's particular interests to the possibilities presented by the comparative method. In addition to regular presentations, a final, formal oral presentation is required as is a final comparative research paper.

SPAN 362: Realist Novel of the Nineteenth Century

R 3:10-5:30

Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu

The seminar will explore the Spanish realist novel through the reading of four primary texts: La Regenta by Leopoldo Alas "Clarín," Fortunata y Jacinta by Benito Pérez Galdós, Los Pazos de Ulloa by Emilia Pardo Bazán and Insolación by the same author. We will also read a selection of documents on the poetics of the realist novel and a set of articles about recent developments in the criticism of the primary texts read and of the period as a whole. Some of the topics to be discussed will be: the problematic of representation, the obsession with the fabrication of people, the politics of gender and sex, the relation of the novel with other art forms and media, the historical conditions of existence of the realist novel, and the social function of literature, its actual or intended performative value.

SPAN 375: Seminar: Studies in Trans-Atlantic Literature and Culture.

Topic: Transatlantic Enlightenment

W 3:10-5:30

Ruth.Hill@vanderbilt.edu

Rigorously interdisciplinary, this survey is an introduction to the major trends and authors of the Hispanic 18th century on both sides of the Atlantic. Readings include novels by the Mexican journalist and novelist J.J. Fernández de Lizardi, La Quijotita y su prima o la educación de las mujeres, and the Portuguese poet and novelist Francisco Botelho de Moraes, Historia de las cuevas de Salamanca. Poetry will also be surveyed, including canti from epics by Francisco Ruiz de León, La Hernandía, and Pedro de Peralta Barnuevo, Lima fundada o la Conquista del Perú. Prose-readings will include selections from: Ignacio de Luzán, Poética; Padre Benito Feijoo y Montenegro, Teatro crítico and Cartas eruditas; newspapers and literary journals such as Mercurio Peruano, Gaceta de México, Gaceta de Madrid, Diario de los literatos de España; Joaquín Antonio de Basarás, Origen, costumbres y estado presente de mexicanos y filipinos Pedro Rodríguez Campomanes, Discurso sobre la educación popular and Discurso sobre el fomento de la industria; Antonio de Ulloa, Noticias americanas o Entretenimientos fisico-históricos sobre la América meridional y la septentrional oriental; Mario Cicala, Descripción de la Real Audiencia de Quito; Pedro Murillo Velarde, Geografía de México y de las Filipinas and Curso de derecho canónico hispano indiano; Urrutia y Montoya, Teatro historico, jurídico y político militar de la Isla Fernandina de Cuba; Hipólito Unanue, Escritos científicos; José Antonio de Villaseñor y Sánchez, Teatro americano: Descripción general de los reinos y provincias de la Nueva España. We shall also address briefly both music and painting. Secondary readings include: Dorinda Outram, The Enlightenment, and Karen Stolley, Domesticating Empire. Paper draft (midterm), book review, oral presentation, and final paper required.

PORTUGUESE

PORT 102: Intensive Elementary Portuguese (Available to grad students for AUDIT only)

01 MTRF 10:05-10:55

02 MTRF 12:10-1:00

An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor. [4 hours]

PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese

MWF 11:10-12:00

Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu

Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 100B, 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language. The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc).

PORT 203: Brazilian Pop Culture

MWF 1:10-2:00

Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu

Portuguese through Pop Culture is a content-based course with emphasis on Brazilian Pop Culture as a tool for acquiring advanced vocabulary, training conversational skills, and developing writing proficiency. This course seeks to explore various aspects of Brazilian culture while practicing advanced level grammar topics, discussing the readings, and engaging in the process of writing.

PORT 232: Brazilian Literature through the Nineteenth Century

TR 9:35-10:50

Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu

Main literary trends, principal writers and works of Brazilian literature, from colonial beginnings through the nineteenth century. Study of the works of Gregório de Matos, Antônio Vieira, Gonçalves Dias, Alencar, Machado de Assis, and João da Cruz e Sousa.

PORT 351: Comparative Methodology (Also listed as SPAN 351)

TR 1:10-2:25

Earl.E.Fitz@Vanderbilt.edu

Comparative Methodology deals with basic methodological questions: What is Comparative Literature and how does one define it? How are Spanish and Portuguese reinvigorating the discipline? How and why is the combined Ph.D. program in Spanish and Portuguese an inherently comparative program? What possibilities does it offer? How does it prepare someone for connecting Latin American literature to inter-American literary study? What constitutes a successful comparative paper or essay? What elements must it have? What are the problems that a comparative study must avoid or resolve if it is to be successful? The course emphasizes connecting one's particular interests to the possibilities presented by the comparative method. In addition to regular presentations, a final, formal oral presentation is required as is a final comparative research paper.

Graduate Course Descriptions – Spanish and Portuguese – Spring 2014

SPANISH

Span 338: Studies in Colonial Literature

Topic: Natural Law and Natural Rights in Colonial Literature

T 3:10-5:30 Furman 319

Jose.Cardenas-Bunsen@vanderbilt.edu

This seminar explores the reassessment that the notion of natural law underwent after Columbus's arrival to the Indies, and traces its influence on the main tenets of major writings from Colonial to Independence times. Emphasis will be put on its literary representation in chronicles, poetry and sermons. Readings from Columbus, Cortés, Vitoria, Las Casas, Bernal Díaz, Ercilla, Inca Garcilaso, António Vieira, Sor Juana, Clavijero and Bolívar among others.

SPAN 352: Issues in Hispanic Cinema

Topic: Transatlantic Voyages

M 4:10-6:30 Buttrick 201

Andres.Zamora@vanderbilt.edu

A study of the pervasiveness of transatlantic travels in contemporary Spanish and Latin American cinema and its possible connection with those primordial historical expeditions that fated the destinies and the profiles of the two sides of the Ocean.  A tentative list of movies to examine includes "Nadie hablará de nosotras cuando hayamos muerto" (Díaz Yanes), "El cuarteto de la Habana" (Fernando Colomo),  "Amores perros" (González Iñárritu), "Y tu mamá también" (Cuarón), "Flores de otro mundo" (Bollain), "Princesas" (León de Aranoa), "La puta y la ballena" (Puenzo), "Plata Quemada" (Piñeyro), "Todo sobre mi madre" (Almodóvar), "Lugares comunes" (Aristarain), "La virgen de la lujuria" (Ripstein), "El espinazo del diablo" (Del Toro) y "Aunque estés lejos" (Tabío).

SPAN 372: 20th and 21st Century Spanish Literature

Topic: Alterity in Contemporary Spain

F 1:10-3:30 Furman 319

Michelle.Shepherd@vanderbilt.edu

This seminar explores the concept of alterity in contemporary Spain through a critical examination of twentieth and twenty-first century narrative. We will analyze how Otherness is remembered, negotiated, and employed to construct national identities, primarily through contrast and negation. Texts may include novels by Ángeles Caso, Benito Pérez Galdós, Juan Goytisolo, Najat el Hachmi, Donato Ndongo, Lourdes Ortiz, José Ovejero, and Manuel Rivas and two films, 14 kilómetros (dir. Olivares 2007) and Extranjeras (dir. Taberna 2003). In addition, we will read complementary theoretical works by Sara Ahmed, Hannah Arendt, Judith Butler, Homi Bhabha, Paul Gilroy, Gayatri Spivak, Timothy Brennan, and Raymond Williams.

Grades will be determined through class participation, a 15-minute presentation, and a final essay.

SPAN 389: Special Topics in Spanish American Literature

Topic: Life and Works of the Cuban Slave Poet Juan Francisco Manzano

R 3:10-5:30 Furman 319

William.Luis@Vanderbilt.edu

In this seminar, we will study the life and works of the Cuban slave poet Juan Francisco Manano, the only slave in Spanish America to write his autobiography. Manzano taught himself to read and write at a time in which slaves were forbidden a formal education. Manzano wrote poems, an autobiography, and a play. He wrote with difficulty, and there are corrected versions of his works, some significantly different from the original. We will consider the different versions of Manzano's autobiography, and situate his writings within the context of the antislavery narratives, with works such as Anselmo Suárez y Romero's Francisco, Féliz Tanco y Bosmeniel's Escenas de la vida privada en la isla de Cuba, and Cirilo Villaverde's Cecilia Valdés, among others of the period. We will also study the impact Manzano had on the abolitionist movements in England, France, and the United States. Indeed, Manzano is a foundational writer of Cuba's literature and culture.

 

PORTUGUESE

PORT 102: Intensive Elementary Portuguese (4 hrs) Available for AUDIT only.

01 MTRF 10:05-10:55 Buttrick 312

02 MTRF 12:10-1:00 Buttrick 312

An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor.

PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese

MWF 1:10-2:00 CA 104

Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu

Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language. The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc).

PORT 205: Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature

TR 1:10-2:25 Furman 302

Earl.E.Fitz@vanderbilt.edu

Portuguese 205 is an introduction to Luso-Brazilian literature through the reading and analysis of literary texts and other cultural productions (such as films and music). Prerequisite: Port 201 or 203.

PORT 233: Modern Brazilian Literature

MWF 11:10-12:00 Buttrick 212

Marcio.Bahia@vanderbilt.edu

The development of Brazilian literature from the Semana de Arte Moderna to the present. We will explore key aspects of Brazilian Modernism such as the concept of cultural anthropophagy, as well as the tensions between the national and regional identities. Novels, short stories, and poetry by masters of the Brazilian literature will include Mario de Andrade (Macunaíma, Pauliceia Desvairada), Oswald de Andrade (Manifesto Antopófago), Vinícius de Moraes (Nova Antologia Poética), Carlos Drummond de Andrade (A Rosa do Povo), Jorge Amado (Gabriela Cravo e Canela), Clarice Lispector (Laços de Família), Guimarães Rosa (Grande Sertão: Veredas), João Cabral de Melo Neto (Morte e Vida Severina), Nelson Rodrigues (A Vida Como Ela É), and Augusto de Campos (Viva Vaia). Finally, we will explore contemporary authors who recently established themselves in the pantheon of Brazilian literature: Cristovão Tezza (O Filho Eterno, 2007) and Milton Hatoum (Dois Irmãos, 2000 and Cinzas do Norte, 2005).

PORT 294-01: Special Topics in Portuguese Language, Literature or Culture: Soccer in Brazilian Culture

TR 11:00-12:15 Furman 007

Emanuelle.Oliveira@vanderbilt.edu

Considering the upcoming World Cup in Brazil, this course examines soccer as one of the main components of Brazilian national identity. Soccer is analyzed through the study of literature, cinema, media, and popular culture. Critical texts in diverse areas of humanities and social sciences (sociology, anthropology, literary criticism, etc) will be used.

CATALAN

In addition, Catalan 102 is being offered and may be audited by graduate students:

CTLN 102: Intensive Elementary Catalan Available for AUDIT only.

MWF 10:10-11:00 Furman 209

Philip.D.Rasico@vanderbilt.edu

This course is an intensive introduction to Catalan, a Romance language of some eight million people of northeastern Spain (Catalonia, Valencia, the Balearic Islands, and a portion of eastern Aragon), the Principality of Andorra, the Department of Roussillon in southwestern France, as well as the town of Alguer (Alghero) on the island of Sardinia. Emphasis will be on oral/aural communication, grammar, reading and culture. Prior study of another Romance language through the intermediate level is highly recommended.

GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – FALL 2013

SPANISH

SPAN/PORT 301: Literary Analysis and Theory

R 1:10-3:30 Furman 202

Andres.Zamora@Vanderbilt.edu

This course is intended as a basic introduction to twentieth-century and contemporary literary theory at a graduate level. One of its objectives will be to provide the students with a survey of theoretical models, terminologies and working tools for literary analysis. We will read general introductions and relevant texts of Russian formalism, New Criticism, reader oriented theories, Marxism, structuralism, psychoanalytic literary theory, feminisms, poststructuralism, postmodernism, cultural studies, New Historicism, postcolonial studies, and gender studies.  We will complement the theoretical readings with a selection of different pieces of textual criticism.

SPAN 303: The Art of Research and Grant Proposal Writing

R 3:10-5:30 Furman 319

Susan.Berk-Seligson@vanderbilt.edu

This course will be conducted in workshop format. It is designed to help graduate students write grant proposals for university-wide competitions for research funds, but will cover the area of grantspersonship more generally. The approach to the course will be to focus on each student's own research project. Students will draft and submit for collective discussion different components of their proposals, leading up to the term project, namely grant proposals that are ready for submission to external funding agencies. The course is useful for students planning to apply both for internal University funding (e.g., Vanderbilt College of Arts and Sciences Summer Research Award Program, Penn Warren Humanities Center, Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) summer travel awards [FLAS, Tinker, Simon Collier], and external fellowships and grants (e.g., Fulbright, Fulbright-Hayes, National Endowment for the Humanities). For those planning to enter the academic job market, the course will prepare them for internal faculty and external grant competitions once they are professors in the tenure-track.

In addition, the course will cover topics such as how to prepare manuscripts for submission to journals, how to write abstracts for consideration by conference organizing committees, and how to prepare for entry into the academic job market.

SPAN/PORT 310: Foreign Language Learning and Teaching (Also listed as Portuguese 310)

M 3:10-5:40 Furman 109

Virginia.M.Scott@Vanderbilt.edu

Principles and practices of teaching a second language, with concentration on recent interactive and communicative models of foreign language instruction. Goals of the course are 1) to introduce principles of Second Language Acquisition and learning, 2) to critically read relevant literature in the area(s), and 3) to develop FL instructor's awareness through reflective and critical thinking. Classroom observations, journal writing, development of materials, and a small action research project are expected. Required of all entering teaching assistants.

SPAN 343: Early Modern Spanish Drama

Topic: The Comedia and Beyond

T 3:10-5:30 Wilson 127

Edward.H.Friedman@Vanderbilt.edu

The course will begin with the frustrated but talented dramatist Miguel de Cervantes, will focus on Lope de Vega and the development of the comedia nueva, and will consider representative works of the neoclassical and Romantic periods. Emphasis will be on reading and discussion of individual plays, a consideration of their multiple contexts, and a survey of dramatic theory from classical antiquity to the present, including performance theory.

Texts will include:

Miguel de Cervantes, La Numancia, "El retablo de las maravillas"

Lope de Vega, "Arte nuevo de hacer comedias en este tiempo," El caballero de Olmedo, Fuenteovejuna, La dama boba, El castigo sin venganza

Tirso de Molina, El burlador de Sevilla

Pedro Calderón de la Barca, El médico de su honra, La vida es sueño

María de Zayas, La traición en la amistad

Ana Caro, Valor, agravio y mujer

Leandro Fernández de Moratín, El sí de las niñas

Ángel Saavedra, Duque de Rivas, Don Álvaro, o la fuerza del sino

José Zorrilla, Don Juan Tenorio

Selected criticism

There will be a reading assignment and a short written exercise for each week. Evaluation will be based on the exercises and class participation (70%) and a final paper of ten to twelve pages (30%). The class will be given in Spanish. The final paper may be in Spanish, Portuguese, or English.

SPAN 375: Studies in Trans-Atlantic Literature

Topic: Poetry in the Era of Memory

F 1:10-3:30 Furman 319

Christina.Karageorgou@Vanderbilt.edu

The purpose of this seminar is to work on a highly debatable topic: lyric trends dealing with memory, oblivion, and social responsibility in modern Hispanic poetry. Moreover, the focus of the course is a dialog of temporal and spatial resonances that coverthe twentieth century and expand over the Atlantic to bridge the distance that separates Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula. Through pairs of poets such as Xavier Villaurrutia (Mexico) and Federico García Lorca (Spain), Jorge Luis Borges (Argentina) and Luis Cernuda (Spain), Susana Thénon (Argentina) and María Ángeles Pérez López (Spain), and Cristina Peri Rossi (Uruguay/Spain) and Noni Benegas (Argentina/Spain), we will examine ways of telling history beyond narration. The word history here means both historical events and social issues that galvanize the polis and its citizens. The theoretical basis of the course will be formed by reflections on art, poetry and society on behalf of Ernst Bloch, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, and Paul Ricoeur.

Evaluation

Oral presentations on Ricoeur, Bloch, Benjamin, and AdornoA series of four interpretive essays, up to five pages each, on any four out of the eight poets and their works to be discussed throughout the course. Each essay is due the day we discuss the poet and her/his work in class (see reading schedule below).A final research/interpretation essay of up to 6000 words (without notes and bibliography), on any one of the eight poets included in the course.

All essays should be sent as attached Word documents to my email before class.

SPAN 389: Special Topics in Spanish American Literature

Topic: Narratives of Nation Building

Ruth.Hill@Vanderbilt.edu

W 3:10-5:30 Furman 319

This course examines U.S. and Latin American nationalisms and literatures (primarily prose from the long-19th century) from the perspective of Hemispheric American Studies. Our secondary readings shall encompass theoretical piece from this field as well as from Latin American Studies. Primary texts may include: A. Bello, Silvas americanas; J. J. Fernández de Lizardi, La Quijotita y su prima; S. Morton, Crania Americana (selections); W. H. Prescott, History of the Conquest of Peru (selections), History of the Conquest of Mexico (selections); W. W. Brown, Clotel, or The President's Daughter; D. F. Sarmiento, "Espíritu y condiciones de la Historia en América," "North and South America," Vida de Abrán Lincoln (introd.); M. Peabody Mann, Juanita; J. E. Rodó, Ariel; George Schuyler, Black No More.

PORTUGUESE

 

01 MTRF 10:05-10:55 Buttrick 304

02 MTRF 12:10-1:00 Buttrick 301

An accelerated introduction to reading, writing, speaking and listening. Emphasis on practical usage. Open to students with prior study of another Romance language or by permission of instructor. [4 hours]

PORT 200: Intermediate Portuguese

MWF 12:10-1:00 Wilson 121

Emanuelle.Oliveira@Vanderbilt.edu

Intermediate Portuguese 200 is a course offering for students who have taken Portuguese 100B, 102 or have acquired Portuguese background elsewhere and wish to continue studying the language. The course is designed to offer a review of grammar through the use of music and other cultural elements (film, television programs, web resources, etc).

PORT 225: Brazilian Culture through Native Materials

TR 11:00-12:15 Furman 325

Marcio.Bahia@Vanderbilt.edu

In this course we will have a historical overview of Brazilian cultural production through the analysis of objects as diverse as sitcoms, soap operas, movies and songs. It will be divided into four main segments: music, cinema, TV and sports. Students will study Brazilian music from the birth of Bossa Nova (1950s) and MPB (Música Popular Brasileira, 1960s) to contemporary musical phenomena such as tecnobrega, funk carioca and sertanejo universitário. We will discuss the development of Brazilian cinema from the Cinema Novo in the 1960s to the retomada in the mid-1990s. In the TV section, we will examine the impact of telenovelas and the role of the mighty Rede Globo in Brazilian society. Finally, beyond the insurmountable importance of soccer, we will also study the development of volleyball as today's second most popular sport in Brazil.

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