Math Calendar

Upcoming Events

September 27, 2016 (Tuesday), 6:00 pm

The Twisted Nature of Polyominoes

Alex Vlasiuk, Vanderbilt University
Location: Stevenson 1206

Polyominoes are flat geometric figures obtained by joining several equal squares edge to edge. They can tile the plane, help you play Tetris or Blokus, serve as a literary subject or a test case for your programming/counting skills, or simply be the building blocks of many a joyous pastime. But for all that flatness, there’s a certain twist to them. (Pizza and drinks will be provided.)

September 28, 2016 (Wednesday), 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Tea

Location: Stevenson 1425

September 30, 2016 (Friday), 3:10 pm

Seiberg-Witten Theory and Geometry of 4-Manifolds

Ioana Suvaina, Vanderbilt University
Location: Stevenson 1310

The Seiberg-Witten theory provides a smooth invariant, which can be used to distinguish homeomorphic, non-diffeomorphic, smooth structures. It also has a deep impact on the Riemannian properties of 4-manifolds. We will discuss how obstructions to the existence of Einstein metrics arise, and how one can compute the Yamabe invariant for Kahler surfaces and some symplectic 4-manifolds.

October 5, 2016 (Wednesday), 4:10 pm

A Bieberbach Theorem for Crystallographic Group Extensions

John Ratcliffe, Vanderbilt University
Location: Stevenson 1310

Joint work with Steven Tschantz. We will talk about our relative Bieberbach theorem: For each dimension n there are only finitely many isomorphism classes of pairs of groups (Γ,N) such that Γ is an n-dimensional crystallographic group and N is a normal subgroup of Γ such that Γ/N is a crystallographic group. This result is equivalent to the statement that for each dimension n there are only finitely many affine equivalence classes of geometric orbifold fibrations of compact, connected, flat n-orbifolds.

October 6, 2016 (Thursday), 4:10 pm

The Einstein Equations and Gravitational Wave

Lydia Bieri, University of Michigan
Location: Stevenson 5211

In Mathematical General Relativity (GR) the Einstein equations describe the laws of the universe. This system of hyperbolic nonlinear pde has served as a playground for all kinds of new problems and methods in pde analysis and geometry. A major goal in the study of these equations is to investigate the analytic properties and geometries of the solution spacetimes. In particular, fluctuations of the curvature of the spacetime, known as gravitational waves, have been a highly active research topic. Last year, gravitational waves were observed for the first time by LIGO. Understanding gravitational radiation is tightly interwoven with the study of the Cauchy problem in GR. I will talk about geometric-analytic results on gravitational radiation and the memory effect of gravitational waves. We will connect the mathematical findings to experiments. I will also address recent work with David Garfinkle on gravitational radiation in asymptotically flat as well as cosmological spacetimes.Tea at 3:30 pm in SC 1425. (Contact Person: Marcelo Disconzi)

October 7, 2016 (Friday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Giusy Mazzone, Vanderbilt University
Location: Stevenson 1307

October 7, 2016 (Friday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Sandeepan Parekh, Vanderbilt University
Location: Stevenson 1432

October 9, 2016 (Sunday), 2:00 pm

Department Picnic

Location: Edwin Warner Park, Shelter 11

Departmental Fall Picnic. For more information contact Graduate Students Sahana Balasubramanya or Bryan Jacobson.

October 19, 2016 (Wednesday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

John Jasper, University of Cincinatti
Location: Stevenson 1432

October 21, 2016 (Friday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Brent Nelson, UC Berkeley
Location: Stevenson 1432

October 26, 2016 (Wednesday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Ben Hayes, Vanderbilt University
Location: Stevenson 1310

October 27, 2016 (Thursday), 4:10 pm

Sharp Energy Minimization for the Triangular Bi-Pyramid

Richard Schwartz, Brown University
Location: Stevenson 5211

For any s>0 one can define the Riesz s-energy potential for a finite configuration of points on the sphere as the sum of the reciprocal s powers of the distances between the points, taken over all pairs. The case of 5 points has been notoriously intractable and it has been long conjectured that there exists a constant S = 15.048… such that the triangular bi-pyramid is the global minimizer for the Riesz s-energy potential if and only if s in (0,S]. I will explain my very recent proof of this result. The argument has some massive (but rigorous) computer calculations in it, but it also involves such ideas as stereographic projection, symmetrization, polynomial interpolation, and divide-and-conquer algorithms. I’ll illustrate the talk with a bunch of computer demos. Tea at 3:30 pm in SC 1425. (Contact Person: Ed Saff)

October 28, 2016 (Friday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Craig Kleski, Miami University in Ohio
Location: Stevenson 1432

November 4, 2016 (Friday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Hung-Chang Liao, Penn State University
Location: Stevenson 1432

November 4, 2016 (Friday), 4:10 pm

On Convergence Almost Everywhere of Spectral Resolutions of Elliptic Differential Operators and the Multiple Fourier Integrals

Ravshan Ashurov, Institute of Mathematics, National University of Uzbekistan
Location: Stevenson 1307

The question of the validity of the Luzin conjecture for the spherical partial sums of the multiple Fourier integrals is open so far. But if we consider the Riess means of the multiple Fourier integrals or in addition if we let f=0 on an open set G, and investigate the convergence to zero a.e. on G (i.e. generalized localization principle), then there are many possitive results. We first remind some of these results, and then study generalized localization principle for compactly supported distributions and present sharp conditions for its fullfilment.

November 8, 2016 (Tuesday), 6:00 pm

The Trouble with Voting

Zach Gaslowitz, Vanderbilt University
Location: Stevenson 1206

We will explore some of the surprising mathematical challenges one runs into when trying to turn a pile of ballots into a single winner. How do we decide who should win, and how does this question influence our democracy as a whole?

November 10, 2016 (Thursday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Haynes Miller, MIT
Location: Stevenson 5211

Tea at 3:30 pm in SC 1425. (Contact Person: Anna Marie Bohmann)

November 11, 2016 (Friday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Elaine Cozzi, Oregon State University
Location: Stevenson 1307

November 11, 2016 (Friday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Daniel Drimbe, UC San Diego
Location: Stevenson 1432

November 17, 2016 (Thursday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Nigel Higson, Penn State
Location: Stevenson 5211

Tea at 3:30 pm in SC 1425. (Contact Person: Rudy Rodsphon)

December 8, 2016 (Thursday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Danny Calegari, University of Chicago
Location: Stevenson 5211

Tea at 3:30 pm in SC 1425. (Contact Person: Mark Sapir)

February 2, 2017 (Thursday), 4:10 pm

Talk Title TBA

Dan Margalit, Georgia Tech
Location: Stevenson 5211

Tea at 3:30 pm in SC 1425. (Contact Person: Spencer Dowdall)