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Spring 2015

Dear Students,

Verify course selections in YES to see the complete selection of course dates and times.

You will need to meet with you adviser IN PERSON before your registration appointment window at which time your adviser will release an electronic academic hold on your account so that you can register. Please email your adviser for an appointment. The name of your adviser as well as the time of your registration appointment window is listed on your YES landing page.

Instructors, sections, and topics for 100-level writing courses are subject to change after Course Request Period, depending on enrollments.

Admittance to Honors sections and 200-level Creative Writing workshops are subject to instructor approval.
See individual course listings for specific instructions.

Note: The descriptions that appear below for Fall 2014 are grouped by course. If you do not find your section number, it means that that instructor has not yet provided a description.  The webmaster will make every effort to continually update this page, so please check back often.    

            

If you are making selections to fulfill requirements for the old major 

These courses meet the pre-eighteen hundred literature major and minor requirement: 
These courses meet the ethnic/non-western       literature major and minor requirement:
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

  If you are making selections to fulfill requirements for the new major  (for which you will be able to declare in fall 2014)

These courses meet the history literature major and minor requirement:                
These courses meet the diverse perspectives literature major and minor requirement:
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
These courses meet the approaches major and minor requirement:                                                                                              
   
   
   
   
   
   
 

ENGL 100

.01 TR 1310-1425 C. Woods

 

ENGL 102W

.01 MWF 910-1000 J. Phelan

Mapping and Wandering: This is a course about space. We will consider how real and imaginary spaces are constructed and represented—by architects and city planners, cartographers, writers of fiction and nonfiction, poets, filmmakers, installation artists, comics artists, radio storytellers, web designers, and others. We will also attend closely to the ways we get to know physical and textual spaces by wandering around in them, figuring out how to get where we're going, straying off-path, breaking our own paths, loitering, exploring, getting lost.
This is also a writing course. We will work at writing clearly and precisely, building strong arguments, and backing them up with close, critical reading. In keeping with the project of the course, we will do a lot of thinking about writing and argumentation in spatial terms. We will experiment with different techniques for mapping texts and arguments and remediating them spatially, and we will try out writing exercises that aim to get us wandering around on the page, making discoveries.

I won't be offering a final this semester.

.02 MWF 1010-1100 K. Mandoza

.03 MWF 1010-1100 A. Lehr

Fear Itself: Literary Monsters: They lurk in our closets, under our beds, and in the darkest pockets of our psyches. In this course, we will turn a critical eye upon literary monsters as embodiments of what we fear and reject. From creature features like Beowulf and Frankenstein, to the modern human boogeymen of Lolita and The Pillowman, we will interrogate how historical/cultural expectations about gender, sexuality, and race shape notions of “monstrosity” in order to better understand how we construct the things we most dread. Enroll . . . if you dare.

.04 MWF 1110-1200 S. Higgs

.05 MWF 910-1000 S. Straub

.06 TR 235-350 A. Johnson

.07 TR 935-1050 K. Navarro

.08 TR 1100-1215 T. McInnis

.09 TR 1435-1550 C, Land

.10 TR 1435-1550 S. Johnson

This course explores religious identity and spiritual agency as an often neglected entry point for thinking through configurations of selfhood and community within the modern period. While traditional models of secularism might suggest that religion plays a declining role in the formation of modern identity, recent political crises (such as paranoia over Islamic immigration in Europe, for example) would suggest that religion continues to function as an enduring force for political action, cultural expression, and public exchange. This course pays particular attention to the immanent meaning of religion expression within communities, specifically to the spaces, geographical borders, and liturgies of modern religion within literary expression. Through its readings, this course proposes that religion often plays a central role in forming political, cultural, and socio-economic publics. This course will focus on ways to closely analyze texts and to use those close readings to develop complex and creative arguments about a text’s meanings within individual papers.

.11 TR 1435-1550 D. Rodrigues

.12 TR 1600-1725 D. Armstrong

In the course of our busy day-to-day lives, we often hear talk about “managing” or “buying" time. These common figures of speech suggest that “time is money,” as Benjamin Franklin so famously said, and that it can be exchanged, made equivalent, and traded in the marketplace. This course will look to literary figures who live according to the tick of a different watch, so to speak: characters who steal time, or ignore, accelerate, or hoard it. Drawing from various genres and reaching across different historical periods, from Renaissance sonnets and drama to postmodern novels and long form television drama, we will explore how literature can give us different--though not necessarily new--ways to think and talk about our own time. 

The course will teach close reading as a method of analysis and encourage students to extend this method beyond literary study to other disciplines. A presentation and discussion will require students to think carefully about how language creates certain perceptions of time in their own fields of interest. Discussion of texts and of student writing on course blogs will occupy most meetings, but some in-class time will also be devoted specifically to the formulation of literary arguments and the writing and revision of literary analysis papers. Outside of class, students will work toward writing goals by crafting three literary analysis papers, and in-class sessions will include peer review and several one-on-one paper conferences with the instructor about that work.

.13 MWF 910-1000 W. Smeele

Beyond the Laboratory: Experimental Science and Medicine in Literature What happens when our experiments leave the laboratory? How are medical and scientific advances incorporated into the cultural consciousness? How does literature’s treatment of science and medicine reimagine the category of the “human”? This course will consider how literature manages scientific and medical experimentation within and beyond the space of the laboratory. By coupling non-literary texts with fiction, we will trace the dialogue between science and medicine, and literature. This course will be structured by topics such as creating the human, cultural constructions of beauty, the ethics of medical experimentation, especially through vivisection and human experimentation during the Third Reich, and the category of the human as it becomes complicated by technologies. Through our readings, we will work towards an understanding of what constitutes an “appropriate” space for experimentation, while considering what implications the merging of the humanities and the sciences have for this conversation.

.14 MWF 1010-1100 L. Dordal

The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of literature, to help you become close readers of literature, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. First, we will focus on poetry, learning how to do a close reading of a poem and how to make a claim about a poem. During our unit on poetry, we will read and discuss TJ Jarrett’s collection entitled Ain’t No Grave (and possibly one other collection of poetry). After this, we will turn our attention to fiction (short stories, specifically). In addition to reading poetry and fiction, we will read several texts about the creative writing process in order to get a sense of how writers do what they do and what the life of a writer “looks” like. Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), one or two class presentations, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions. 

 

ENGL 104W Prose Fiction: Forms and Techniques

.01 MWF 900-1000 Staff

.02 MWF 1110-1200 Staff

.03 MWF 1210-1300 Staff

.04 MWF  1510-1600 J. Quarrey

.05 MWF 1410-1500 J. Quarrey

.06 MWF 1310-1400 E. August

.07 MWF 910-1000 E. August

 

 

ENGL 105W Drama: Forms and Techniques

.01

.02 TR 935-1050 J. Klass

.03 TR 1310-1425 J. Klass

.04 TR 1600-1715 B. Orr

 

ENGL 115F First Year Writing Seminar

.04 TR 935-1050 J. Wanninger

.19 MWF 1310-1400 C. Amich

.22 TR 1010-1100 A. Hearn

More than Mr. Darcy: The Life and Works of Jane Austen: It is a truth universally acknowledged that a young woman of good feeling must be in love with Mr. Darcy.  Like all such truths in Austen’s fiction, however, this one could stand some finessing—there’s more to Jane Austen than Mr. Darcy.  (There’s also more to Mr. Darcy than Mr. Darcy.)  Jane Austen the woman and Jane Austen the novelist offer students an excellent personal and academic model: so much of her fiction, indeed the course of her own life, turns on the acquisition of self-knowledge, sound judgment, and independent thought—qualities essential to living a good life as well as writing a good essay.

Although the study of Jane Austen and her fiction could happily engage a lifetime, we will make a good start by reading at least three of the six main novels, dipping into the novelist’s entertaining letters, and exploring the world of the woman and her work.   We will read the two novels that bookend Austen’s beloved Pride and Prejudice (Sense and Sensibility and Mansfield Park); we will also likely read Austen’s final novel, Persuasion.  We will study these works as both literary texts and examples of successful composition, gaining an understanding of their historical, cultural, and biographical contexts.  We will write three formal academic essays, with one assignment having a research component.

One final note: one need not love Austen’s work or even know it to enroll in and enjoy this course.  Also, one need not be a girl.

.45 TR 1600-1715 C. Dayan

WORLD WAR I: A HUNDRED YEARS LATER: World War I generated a tremendous amount of writing by soldiers, soldiers’ families, politicians, journalists, poets, and others. Some celebrated the “Great War,” others decried it. This course takes a broad and interdisciplinary approach in order to reconsider this conflict and its legacy. We will read poetry, novels, memoirs, journalism, propaganda, and, now, the just released diaries of British soldiers (actually regimental diaries) from the front. We shall also look at how the War was used in the new medium of film. What made citizens of the most “civilized” nations on earth kill one another at unprecedented rates for four years? What kinds of writings seek to recall, commemorate, or condemn “the war to end all wars”?

Readings include poetry by Wilfred Owen, Siegried Sassoon, Rupert Brooke, and others; novels such as Ford Maddox Ford, A Man Could Stand Up, Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme, Pat Barker, Regeneration; memoirs including Vera Brittain, Testament of Youth, Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That; and historical works, for example, Adam Hochschild, To End All Wars and John Keegan, “The Somme, 1 July 1916,” The Face of Battle.

 

ENGL 116W Introduction to Poetry

.01 MWF 910-1000 N. Roche

.02 MWF 1010-1100 C. Cosner

.03 MWF 1110-1200 L. Dordal

The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, imagery, figures of speech, sound, rhythm, etc.). In the second half of the course, we will read and discuss Nick Flynn’s collection of poetry entitled Some Ether and TJ Jarrett’s collection entitled Ain’t No Grave. The second part of the course also will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, and Langston Hughes. Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), two brief class presentations, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions.   

.04 MWF 1210-1300 C. Cosner

.05 MWF 1210-1300 E. August

.06 MWF 1310-1400 J. Morrell

.07 MWF 1510-1600 L. Dordal

The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, imagery, figures of speech, sound, rhythm, etc.). In the second half of the course, we will read and discuss Nick Flynn’s collection of poetry entitled Some Ether and TJ Jarrett’s collection entitled Ain’t No Grave. The second part of the course also will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, and Langston Hughes. Requirements will include three papers (plus revisions), two brief class presentations, short response papers and homework assignments, and participation in class discussions.   

.08 TR 935-1050 A. Kinard

.09 TR 1100-1215 A. Johnson

.10 MWF 1410-1500 C. Cosner

.11 TR 810-925 A. Johnson

.12 MWF 1110-1200 D. Birdsong

 

ENGL 117W

.01TR 1100-1215 F. Barter

.02 MWF 1210-1300 A. Miller

This course surveys the literature of literature: those texts which take fiction, poetry, or drama as specimens of study rather than vehicles of expression. If a good book is like a luxury car, literary criticism is the study of said car’s engine. Literary criticism, in other words, sets its sights on the mechanics of literature itself. It seeks to answer the question: what makes literature work? In addition to edifying ourselves as to how literary criticism has, over the millennia, answered this question, this course also poses a question for the student: what are the ramifications—aesthetic, moral, social, and historical—of literary criticism itself? That is to say, what are we to make of its work and impact on our relationships to literature and to broader culture? The ambition of this course is for students to construct informed opinions on this much debated question, and to be able to represent and argue their opinions via persuasive writing.

 

ENGL 118W

.01 MWF 810-900 A. Miller

This course exposes students to various aspects of cultural theory which pertain to the many components of the “virtual”—specifically, the virtual as created by digital means. The primary “texts” of this class is the online simulator Second Life (available free). Students will be trained as cultural theorists, and over the course of the semester they will record their observations of Second Life’s content. Each week students will be required to focus on a different theme (corresponding to that week’s theoretical readings) and must draft a two-page, prose record of those observations (to be posted to the class blog). These observations will serve as examples for in-class discussions of that week’s theoretical readings. At the end of the semester, each student will be required to produce a ten-page essay that critically analyzes these observations using one of the theoretical models discussed throughout the semester. The result will be a compendium of observations and critical insights on Second Life, authored by students, and made available to them as a single document at the end of the semester. 

.02 MWF 910-1000 R. Spivey

.03 MWF 1010-1100 G. Briggs

.04 MWF 1010-1100 A. Miller

This course exposes students to various aspects of cultural theory which pertain to the many components of the “virtual”—specifically, the virtual as created by digital means. The primary “texts” of this class is the online simulator Second Life (available free). Students will be trained as cultural theorists, and over the course of the semester they will record their observations of Second Life’s content. Each week students will be required to focus on a different theme (corresponding to that week’s theoretical readings) and must draft a two-page, prose record of those observations (to be posted to the class blog). These observations will serve as examples for in-class discussions of that week’s theoretical readings. At the end of the semester, each student will be required to produce a ten-page essay that critically analyzes these observations using one of the theoretical models discussed throughout the semester. The result will be a compendium of observations and critical insights on Second Life, authored by students, and made available to them as a single document at the end of the semester.

.05 MWF 1110-1200 G. Briggs

.06 MWF 1210-1300 K. Klein

.07 TR 810-900 M. Minarich

.08 TR 1310-1425 C. Tichi

.09 MWF 1510-1600 K. Klein

.10 TR 935-1050 N. Roche

.11 TR 1100-1215 P. Aulakh

.12 TR 1310-1425 N. Roache

.13 TR 1310-1425 M. Minarich

.14 TR 1600-1715 M. Minarich

.15 MWF 1610-1700

.16 MWF 1010-1100 R. Spivey

.17 MWF 910-1000 K. Klein

.18 MWF 1110-1200

.21 MWF 1310-1400

 

ENGL 120W Intermediate Composition

.01 TR 1100-1215 R. Spivey

 

ENGL 123 Beginning Poetry Workshop

.02 TR 1100-1215 A. Brandewie

.03 MWF 1410-1500 E. Kunz

 

 ENGL 199 Foundations of Literacy

.01 TR 1310-1425 L.Lopez

Imaginative Writing: Joining the Conversation.  “Foundations of Literary Study” aims to enrich the experience of reading, writing and reflecting on literature, while seeking to answer these questions: What is literature?  And why does it matter?  Designated for students interested in pursuing the creative-writing track, this section of the course will also be a good option for those who wish to compose and workshop original poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and drama while developing close-reading and analytic writing skills.  As contemporary literature is the focus of this class, we will read, analyze, and evaluate recently published work as an ongoing conversation—a context—with which emerging writers must become familiar before entering.  The primary readings will be accompanied by  The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms , as well as other critical and theoretical concepts.

 

Required Texts:

Janet Burroway, Imaginative Writing

Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams: Essays

Neil LaBute, The Money Shot: A Play

Jamie Quatro,  I Want to Show You More
Natasha Tretheway,  Thrall: Poems
The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms  
 

 

.02 MWF 1410-1500 S. Juengel

 

 

 

ENGL 201 Advanced Nonfiction Writing

 

.01 M 1510-1800 P. Guralnick

 

 

 

ENGL 202 Literature and the Craft of Writing

 

.01 TR 1310-1425 N. Reisman

 

 

 

ENGL 204 Intermediate Fiction Workshop

 

.01 T 1510-1800 L. Lopez

 

This section of creative writing focuses on developing and refining techniques of fiction writing as related to the short story.  Fiction writing is a craft, as well as a discipline and a process.  This course is designed to help students hone skills, such as, but not limited to developing effective characterization, using perspective judiciously and consistently, proportioning summary (exposition) appropriately to scene, developing setting and imagery that interacts with characterization or resonates metaphorically, as well as selecting and applying significant detail to enhance scene, characterization, and tone.  To better apprehend and build such techniques and others, students will write two original short stories, complete writing exercises, attend and respond to three literary events, and analyze published short stories to discuss structural and stylistic components that contribute to these narratives, in addition to reading text on craft on a weekly basis and critiquing work from peers.

 

Required Texts:

Janet Burroway, et al, Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (8th Edition)

Jennifer Egan and Heidi Pitlor, The Best American Short Stories 2014

 

 

ENGL 221 Medieval Literature

.01 TR 1100-1215 J. Plummer

This course introduces the student to the chief literary forms and cultural issues of the late 13th through the 15th centuries in England.  We learn Middle English while reading chronicles, saints = lives, drama, romance, lyrics, and allegory, exploring the alterity and modernity of medieval culture, what we have in common with the period and how we differ from it.  No previous experience with medieval studies is required or expected.  Graded work includes a midterm and final exam, a paper of 8-10 pages, and class participation.

 

ENGL 251 Milton

 

.01 TR 1435-1550 R. Hilles, and L. Marcus

 

John Milton has long been reputed the second greatest writer in English after Shakespeare, but he has almost always been more controversial than Shakespeare. In this course we will find out why.  We will read all of “Classic” Milton: Comus, Lycidas, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes and the minor poems, with major emphasis on Paradise Lost. We will also dip into Milton’s prose, in which he advocated such daring and radical ideas (for his time) as freedom of the press, freedom of religion, and divorce for incompatible partners in marriage. Major emphasis will be placed on considering his writings in the context of the shifting political landscape before and during the English Civil War and its aftermath.  Since this is an honors course, there will be no exams.  Written work will consist of a short paper (4-5 pp.) during the semester and a longer paper (10-15 pp.) at the end of the course.  There will also be frequent presentations by groups of students working together.

 

 ENGL 254 The Romantic Period

.01 TR 1600-1715 H. Garcia
Romanticism after the Apocalypse: According to many twenty-first-century apocalyptic prophecies, the world was supposed to end on December 21st, 2012, yet previous students who took this course survived with a passing grade and you are now reading this course description. Such prophecies are, of course, false and inaccurate, but their emotional and cultural appeal is so powerful because they address a modern obsession with the passage of time and the end of history.  This thematic course treats these contemporary apocalyptic anxieties as deeply rooted in the cultural and literary transformations that we now retrospectively call “British Romanticism.”  British Romantic writers worried about the demise of humankind and the planet, but also hoped for a regenerative revolution that remakes the world anew after the apocalypse.  We will examine the Romantic discourse of “apocalypse” as a religious, secular, and political phenomenon that captivated the British imagination between 1789 and 1830.  The following questions will guide our thinking: why does the Romantic poet-prophet replace the priest and politician as a legislator speaking for the world?  Could women adopt this prophetic position?  How does poetry assume supernatural insight into the past, present, and future?  How does “the end of history” theme shape the way British Romantics write for their contemporaries and to us—their post-apocalyptic progenitors?  In order to answer these questions, we will spend the first part of the semester studying sections of William Wordsworth’s The Prelude (in its various editions); then the fierce controversy that was sparked by the 1789 revolution in France; and, during the last half of the course, the revolutionary mytho-poetic prophecies of John Keats, Lord Byron, and P. B. Shelley.  The course will conclude with Mary Shelley’s doomsday novel, The Last Man (1826), a romantic spoof on the Romantics’ apocalyptic poetics.

This course is designed to give you a firm training in effectively using multi-media and blogs to communicate online with a “real” public audience (see the blog for a previous version of this course: http://romanticismandapocalypse.wordpress.com ).  Toward that end, you are expected to think, write, create, and imagine wildly.  Attendance and participation, in and out of class, are not just mandatory but essential to your success.

 

ENGL 262 Literature and the Law

.01 TR 1600-1715 C. Dayan

FROM THE PLANTATION TO THE PENITENTIARY: INTERPRETATION, LITERATURE AND THE LAW:              

Whilst society in the United States gives the example of the most extended liberty, the prisons of the same country offer the spectacle of the most complete despotism.—Beaumont and Tocqueville, On the Penitentiary System in the United States (1831)

This course will examine how punishment, prisons, incapacitation, and torture not only became critical to the meaning of democracy and freedom in the United States but also shaped a history of property and possession essential to what Thomas L. Dumm in Democracy and Punishment has called "the American project."

Ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution was announced in December 1865.  The Thirteenth Amendment outlawed slavery and involuntary servitude “except as punishment of crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.” The legal exception became the means for terminological slippage: those who were once slaves were now criminals.  Such an amendment amounted to nothing less than an escape clause, a corrective that left the essence of enslavement intact. 

Crucial questions to be considered:
1) What is the connection between slavery and imprisonment?
2) How does the mobilization of history trump arguments about justice?
3) What are the legitimate rights of the state over the liberty interests of the incarcerated?
4) What is the relation between the status of criminal as “slave of the state” and of the slave as property or thing?
5) What are the conditions sufficient for attaining the status of “citizen”?
6) What does it mean to be dead in law?
7) And perhaps most important now in the United States: Is the prison, though invisible to most of us, now the defining framework for civil society?  Does that zone of exclusion become the grid for discriminatory practice, surveillance, labeling, and disregard in everyday life?

We will examine legal, philosophical and historical texts, as well as fictional and cinematic re-enactments of lockdown and criminality, the death penalty, chain gangs, and supermax confinement. Case law is central to this course. Texts include Mumia Abu Jamal, Live from Death Row; Colin Dayan, The Law is a White Dog;Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow;Herman Melville, Billy Budd and Other Stories; Angela Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete? Also, cases such as Furman v. Georgia (1972), Wilson v. Seiter (1991); Madrid v. Gomez (1995); Bea rd v. Banks (2006); Baze v. Rees (2008).

 

ENGL 273 Problems in Literature

.01 TR 935-1050 J. Plummer

Star-Crossed Lovers:
"Ay me!  for aught that I could ever read,
Could ever hear by tale or history,
The course of true love never did run smooth."
-- A Midsummer Night's Dream

As Lysander in Shakespeare's play claims, literature is filled with unhappy, unlucky, tragic loves.  This course will examine some of the most famous of these, and enquire into the varieties of "crossings," or impediments to true love as well as exploring reasons for the popularity of the motif.  Some of the literary texts  included are these:
Tristan and Isolde ; selections from Malory's Morte Darthur, especially "The Book of Sir Launcelot and Queen Guenevere" and "The Most Piteous Tale of the Morte Arthur Saunz Guerdon"; Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Troilus and Cressida, and  Midsummer Night's Dream; versions of the story of Orpheus and Euridice including Ovid's (Metamorphoses), Boethius' (Consolation of Philosophy), the Middle English Sir Orfeo, Cocteau's Orphée [play and film], and the Brazilian film Black Orpheus; Versions of the story of Abelard and Eloise, including Pope's "Eloïsa to Abelard; Pyramus and Thisbe (Metamorphoses 4).

In addition to the films mentioned above we will view Casablanca.

.02 TR 1100-1215 H. Baker Jr.

 

ENGL 274 Major Figures in Literature

.01 TR R. Teukolsky

Oscar Wilde and the 1890s: “I was a man who stood in symbolic relations to the art and culture of my age.” So wrote Oscar Wilde in 1897, from the confinement of a prison cell. Wilde’s career offers a revealing glimpse into late-Victorian culture and society—from his roots in Ireland, to his ascent in London society as a celebrated wit and playwright, to his stunning arrest and imprisonment for “acts of gross indecency” with other men. This course will examine Wilde’s writings within the context of the last decade of the nineteenth century, when anxieties about the fate of British culture and empire spurred a kind of conservative hysteria, along with the subversive counter-culture known as “decadence.” Texts will include Wilde’s poetry, essays on art, aesthetics, and socialism, his plays The Importance of Being Earnest and Lady Windermere’s Fan,and his gothic novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. We will also consider his decadent play Salomé, published in book form with illustrations by Aubrey Beardsley and banned by London censors before it could make it to the Victorian stage. Other authors and artists will help us to understand the rebellious art-culture of the 1890s: Walter Pater, R. L. Stevenson, J.-K. Huysmans, Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Symons, J. M. Whistler, D. G. Rossetti, Max Beerbohm, George Egerton, Amy Levy, and Michael Field, among others.

 

ENGL 276 Anglophone African Literature

.01 TR 1435-1550 M. Milazzo

Post-1994 South African Fiction: In this course we will examine post-apartheid South African fiction written in English, with an emphasis on novels by young writers that creatively capture the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Starting with an assessment of colonialism and segregation, we will examine contemporary fiction with an eye towards the representation of apartheid’s legacies. In reading novels that will take us from the University of Cape Town campus to the poverty-stricken inner-city area of Hillbrow in Johannesburg, we will explore an exciting literary landscape as well as gain a critical understanding of actual challenges that shape ordinary life in present-day South Africa, especially for the youth. In the process, we will consider the great diversity and vibrancy that characterize South Africa, a country with eleven official languages and ethnic groups, and ask: What is new (and what is not) about the “New” South Africa and its literature? To enrich our analyses, in class we will also examine South African music, video, film, documentary and news media. Main course requirements: participation, weekly short responses on OAK, one film screening outside of regular class time, at least one paper conference meeting with the professor, one final research paper.

All students are welcome; no prior knowledge or special skill is required.

Required books:
Mark Mathabane, Kaffir Boy: The True Story of a Black Youth’s Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (1986)
Zakes Mda, Ways of Dying (1995)
J.M. Coetzee, Disgrace (1999)
Phaswane Mpe, Welcome to Our Hillbrow (2001)
Kgebetli Moele, Room 207 (2006)
C.A. Davis, The Blacks of Cape Town (2013)
Thando Mgqolozana, Unimportance (2014)

 

ENGL 277 Asian American Literature

.01 TR 1310-1425 H. Shin

Stranger in a Home Land: Asian American Literature and the Mechanisms of Alienation: American culture stands at the intersection of diverse cultural traditions and ethnicities. Among the many nodes that constellate this colorful landscape, members of certain communities who bear social markers that stand apart from the perceived majority are often represented as alien— strangers in their own home land. Whether it be outright discrimination, unsavory stereotypes, or their satiric appropriations that seemingly subvert but also insidiously reinforce deeply ingrained prejudices, mechanisms of alienation permeate our society on countless fronts. Situating Asian American literature in this broader context of critical minority discourse, this class invites students to problematize accepted standards of normalcy and investigate their modes of delivery across different mediums including written text, film, graphic narrative, television, and social media. The course materials themselves deviate from mainstream Asian American fiction in their style and genre (ranging from science fiction to dystopian futures, magical realism, comedy, and the superhero narrative), further complicating the metrics of “otherness” the class will explore with questions such as the following: could the use of racial, ethnic, and cultural stereotypes be justified when framed as critical commentary? How are we to demarcate the thin line between appropriation and inordinate reproduction? What happens when “otherness” as concept becomes translated (in other words, technologized) across mediums, for instance from written text to visual media, and how may we understand the gaps and misalignments that constitute this process? How does technology, in communicating indexes of otherness or as a source of power in the age of global capital, serve as a double-edged sword in addressing the issues of alienation when specifically applied to the Asian context?

Required Texts (Books to purchase):
Gary Shteyngart, Super Sad True Love Story
Chang-rae Lee, On Such a Full Sea
Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew, The Shadow Hero
Kevin Kwan, Crazy Rich Asians
Charles Yu, How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe
Karen Tei Yamashita, Tropic of Orange

Available on OAK
Critical materials on concepts such as the yellow peril, model minority, racial melancholia, techno-orientalism, and tiger mom, among others
News reports and social media posts on current events (the #cancelcolbert campaign, the Lynsanity phenomenon, the Asiana pilot name fiasco, etc.)


Class Screening (also available at the library, or online streaming services)
Cloud Atlas (film)
Episodes from Fresh off the Boat (TV)

 

 

ENGL 279 Ethnic American Literature

.01 TR 1110-1200 C. Amich

 

ENGL 282 The Bible in Literature

.01 MWF 1110-1200 R. Gottfried

 

ENGL 287 Investigative American Writers

.01 W 1510-1700 A. Little

 

 

LATS 201 - Dual-listed with English and Women’s and Gender Studies.
Spring 2015 – TR 4:00-5:15pm
Dr. Marzia Milazzo

Crossing Borders: Introduction to Latino and Latina Studies: This course provides an introduction to the histories and cultural productions of Latinas and Latinos in the United States, with a main focus on Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Cuban American and Central/South American communities. We will pay close attention to how race, class, gender, sexuality and citizenship intersect to create differential experiences between and within Latina/o communities. The course will provide a platform not only for examining interconnections and differences between Latin@s but also for understanding key relationships with other groups, in particular African American, European American, and Native American communities. Through the study of history, fiction, creative nonfiction, sociology, film (Sleep Dealer), music (from corridos to hip hop) and other genres, we will grapple with realities that shape the lived experiences of Latina/o communities by employing the conceptual lens of “the border.” In the process, we will ask: Why can some people cross borders more easily than others? What kinds of boundaries separate a “citizen” from an “alien” or a “criminal” from the “innocent”? How are legality and illegality constructed? What purposes do “Close the Border” discourses and anti-immigration propaganda at large serve? What does it mean to inhabit a border? Main course requirements: participation, weekly short responses on OAK, one film screening outside of regular class time, at least one paper conference meeting with the professor, one final research paper or creative project.

Dual-listed with English and Women’s and Gender Studies.
All students are welcome; no prior knowledge or special skill is required.

 

 

Amer 295 D. Nelson
Global Warming: Science, Politics, Economy, Culture: Wikipedia reports that “Global warming is the unequivocal and continuing rise in the average temperature of Earth's climate system.”  “Sorry Global Warming Alarmists, The Earth Is Cooling,” rebuts a Forbes headline.  It’s the surface temperature, it’s the atmosphere, linear reactions, adjusted data.  The climate is warming; the rate of warming has slowed; it’s over.  There’s a strong scientific consensus. . . or there isn’t.  The issue has become deeply politicized, and the economic and social stakes are high.
 
This course will examine the science as well as cultural inputs both to the science and the popular interpretation of the science of global warming in the United States.  Our goal will be to understand both the quality of the science, various popular and policy responses to the science, and the main lines of resistance to that science.  We will think broadly about evidence for global warming, drawing on class research and your own independent and team research, and will narrow our focus to one or two particular policy issues toward the end of the class.  As we go, we will consider carefully the art of persuasion in the light of what we learn.
 
Requirements will include:  reading, discussion, short independent research papers, longer research project, and team reports.

LATS 201 - Dual-listed with English and Women’s and Gender Studies.
TR 4:00-5:15pm Dr. Marzia Milazzo
Crossing Borders: Introduction to Latino and Latina Studies : This course provides an introduction to the histories and cultural productions of Latinas and Latinos in the United States, with a main focus on Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Cuban American and Central/South American communities. We will pay close attention to how race, class, gender, sexuality and citizenship intersect to create differential experiences between and within Latina/o communities. The course will provide a platform not only for examining interconnections and differences between Latin@s but also for understanding key relationships with other groups, in particular African American, European American, and Native American communities. Through the study of history, fiction, creative nonfiction, sociology, film (Sleep Dealer), music (from corridos to hip hop) and other genres, we will grapple with realities that shape the lived experiences of Latina/o communities by employing the conceptual lens of “the border.” In the process, we will ask: Why can some people cross borders more easily than others? What kinds of boundaries separate a “citizen” from an “alien” or a “criminal” from the “innocent”? How are legality and illegality constructed? What purposes do “Close the Border” discourses and anti-immigration propaganda at large serve? What does it mean to inhabit a border? Main course requirements: participation, weekly short responses on OAK, one film screening outside of regular class time, at least one paper conference meeting with the professor, one final research paper or creative project.

 

Dual-listed with English and Women’s and Gender Studies.

All students are welcome; no prior knowledge or special skill is required.

 

Required books:

Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza

Blas Falconer & Lorraine López, The Other Latin@: Writing Against a Singular Identity

Juan Gonzalez, Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America

Cristina Henríquez, The Book of Unknown Americans: A Novel  

Adriana Páramo, Looking for Esperanza: The Story of a Mother, a Child Lost, and Why

            They Matter to Us

Victor Rios, Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys