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Spring 2014

Dear Students,

Verify course selections in YES to see the complete selection of course dates and times.

You will need to meet with you adviser IN PERSON before your registration appointment window at which time your adviser will release an electronic academic hold on your account so that you can register. Please email your adviser for an appointment. The name of your adviser as well as the time of your registration appointment window is listed on your YES landing page.

Instructors, sections, and topics for 100-level writing courses are subject to change after Course Request Period, depending on enrollments.

Admittance to Honors sections and 200-level Creative Writing workshops are subject to instructor approval.
See individual course listings for specific instructions.

Note: The descriptions that appear below for Spring 2014 are grouped by course. If you do not find your section number, it means that that instructor has not yet provided a description.  The webmaster will make every effort to continually update this page, so please check back often.

 

 

These courses meet the ethnic/non-western literature major and minor requirement: These courses meet the pre-eighteen hundred literature major and minor requirement:
ENGL 214a  ENGL 208a
ENGL 263.01  ENGL 210
ENGL 263.02  ENGL 221
ENGL 276  ENGL 249
ENGL 283  ENGL 251
ASIA 200W  ENGL 252a
LATS 201  ENGL 282
JS 237  ENGL 28801
   
   

 

Spring 2014 100-level English Courses:

ENGL 100: Composition

.01 MWF 1410-1500 A. Hines

This course will help you grow as a writer by focusing on the skills and processes of academic writing. In addition to reviewing mechanical skills, we will explore how writing is a community activity, rather than a solitary endeavor. This means that you will have to think about the audience of your writing. We will discuss how to anticipate and account for what your audience expects of your writing’s structure, tone, and argumentative content. To have a common subject for the writing you will do in this course, we will explore the idea of the University. What exactly is a University supposed to do anyway? Why is the University organized the way it is? How might the University change to meet the demands of globalization and the digital age? We will read and analyze essays and personal accounts that address these questions and other issues that arise from encountering institutions of higher education. 

 

102W: Literature and Analytical Thinking

.01 MWF 910-1000 D. Armstrong

Rock 'n' Roll Shakespeare: English 102W seeks to develop writing and critical thinking skills by engaging students with literature from various genres and periods. This course will aim toward that broader goal by exploring moments when Shakespeare and rock ‘n’ roll have collided, converged, or at least noticeably coexisted.  Some of the specific questions we will engage include the following: When and why do more recent authors, songwriters, and filmmakers invoke Shakespeare? To what extent do these invocations adopt and/or adapt Shakespearean language, characters, and themes? How is the concept of “Shakespeare” affected by such appropriations, which often occur in different media? Answering these questions calls for careful analysis of modern media and close reading of Shakespearean poetry and drama, in which students will hopefully find intellectual excitement and confidence.  Ultimately, students should leave the course with a better understanding of the conventions of early modern drama and poetry as well as a honed ability as cultural critics. Critical facility will be demonstrated in writing and in speech, through persuasive analytical essays, creative writing, and class discussion.  Significant time will be devoted to discussing the process of developing and defending critical arguments in writing.

.02 MWF 1010-1100 R. Averin

Post-Apocalyptic Literature and the African Diaspora:Post-apocalyptic literature has experienced a surge of popularity in recent decades—particularly post-9/11— but it is hardly a new genre, within or without the African diaspora. In this class we will explore how representations of post-apocalypse in the African diaspora including film, novels, short stories, and plays engage with and/or depart from more dominant figurations of post-apocalypse. Why might writers choose the post-apocalyptic as a genre to engage with present issues of race, class, gender, identity, and belonging? What makes it a particularly attractive genre for certain African diasporic authors? We will look at texts produced by artists throughout the diaspora such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Lorraine Hansberry, Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, Nnedi Okorafor, and the Hughes Brothers. In addition to textual analysis, past and current socio-political events concerned with apocalypse and post-apocalypse will factor into our class discussions, mirroring the authors’ literary and imaginative engagement with contemporary socio-political issues.

.03 MWF 1010-1100 S. Johnson

Inquiry into Race, Colonialism, and Capitalism:This course takes as its subject the history of slavery and colonialism. We will explore stories and memories of slavery and colonialism at the crossroads of fiction, autobiography, economics, and political theory. In our first unit of the semester, we will analyze a series of texts debating the political and economic costs of slavery’s institutionalization, and the function this institutionalization played in strengthening Western capitalism. In our second unit of the semester, we investigate a series of fictional texts – novels, short stories, and poems – addressing the impact and continuing legacy of slavery and colonialism into the twentieth century. In our final unit, we will explore three very different texts addressing racism and economics in the twentieth century.

.04 MWF 1110-1200 C. Land

Speculative Fiction as Cultural Lens:Consulting everything from novels and short stories to movies, TV, and graphic novels, we will explore the uses of science fiction and fantasy tropes as a form of social commentary in contemporary media. To do so, we will begin by examining the question of why a fantastic or futuristic setting might make an attractive venue for considering philosophical or social issues in the real world, and afterward will follow-up by working through some iconic examples of such texts. Using these works as a starting point, we will develop skills in critical reading and writing by practicing textual analysis, close-reading, critical thinking, coherent argument based on textual evidence, and revision, producing at least three essays over the course of the semester.

.05 MWF 910-1000 T. McInnis

.06 TR 810-925 K. Navarro

Queer Identity and Literary Adaptation:In this course, we will explore how political, cultural, and social critique can be enacted through literary adaptation, focusing particularly on questions of queer identity. What is designated by the term “queer,” and how might literary adaptation as a phenomenon open up (or close off) queer potentialities? Through class-wide discussion, we will interrogate the concept of queerness and its several valences by engaging adapted texts in different mediums. Ultimately, we will grapple with the necessary indeterminacy of “queer” as a term and all the interpretive potential facilitated by this very fluidity. As this is a writing intensive course designed to strengthen analytical and critical skills, we will devote a large portion of the class toward honing your own writing skills. The central goal of the course is to provide you with the toolkit you will need to write thoughtful, persuasive arguments. The texts we examine as well as the discussions we have will all serve as fuel for your own development as prose writers.

.07 TR 935-1050 D. Rodrigues

All Hail the Queen: What motivates our enduring fascination with forms of female sovereignty? Why is our culture obsessed with the anointing, appointing, and destroying of queens? From the charismatic female monarchs of the British Tudor dynasties to the global divas of contemporary pop and rock music, this course will explore cultural and literary artifacts that idolize, fetishize, and demonize female figures that variously uphold and threaten the social order. We will focus particular attention on canonical works of art and literature that have contributed to social constructions of queenliness; expectations for queens in terms of performance as the concept of "the queen" changes over time and place; and depictions of queens and queen-like figures in contemporary musical, cinematic, and multimedia texts. Our objects of study--ranging from Shakespearean sovereigns to Disney princesses to downtown drag queens--will require us to engage theories of race, class, and gender, and sexuality as we explore the politics of female iconicity. 

.08 TR 1100-1215 RJ. Boutelle

You Say You Want a Revolution? : We all want to change the world. This course examines literary and political texts that explore the rhetoric, ideologies, and aftermath of revolutions from across the globe. We’ll be reading manifestos, historical texts, critical essays, and literature that emerge from/in response to anticolonial movements and large-scale rebellions. We’ll explore the relationships between calls to action and organized violence, the frequent disconnect between proposed reformations and actual change, and alternative perspectives on the same political upheavals. In our consideration of power and responses to it, we’ll consider how issues of race, gender, class, and nation manifest in revolutionary discourses.

.09 TR 1310-1425 M. Castro

The Body in Literature:In this course, we will explore ways in which the human body has been depicted throughout literary history. We will ask questions about domination and control, ability and disability, and what it means to have a human body in the first place. We will read and critically analyze poetry, drama, fiction, and film, spanning the centuries.

.10 TR 1234-1550 F. Barter

Imagining New York: How do literary texts and films construct New York City? How do you imagine New York City when you picture it in your mind? It might be the iconic skyline, the Subway, a particular neighborhood, the fashion and garment industry, a site of immigration, or something else altogether.  In this course, we will examine literary constructions of New York City, paying close attention to how authors attempt to breathe life into the quintessential city.  Particular attention will be paid to how people and place collide in New York in ways both exhilarating and oppressive.  Possible readings include Fires in the Mirror, Brown Girl, Brownstones, Passing, and Breakfast at Tiffany's.  Possible film screenings include The Gangs of New York, Do the Right Thing, and Girls.

.11 TR 1435-1550 D. Fang

Ghost Stories and Haunted Houses: The Politics of Haunting in Literature and Film . This course explores the hidden meaning of ghost and haunted house stories. Why have they been so popular throughout the ages? What anxieties and desires do they reflect, especially in terms of sexuality, race, and class? We will read works like Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved, as well as watch haunted house movies (such as the recent popular horror movie, The Conjuring) in order to parse out what lies beneath supernatural occurrences in the home.

.12 TR 1600-1715 L. Mensah

Course Title: Black Masculinity and the American Urban Space: This course highlights the intersection of race, gender, and spatiality by exploring black masculinity within the context of urban spaces in the United States. These spaces include Los Angeles during the 1940s, New York City in the 1970s, and San Francisco in 2009. We will use a series of novels, short stories, and poems as a means of investigating the multiple and contested viewpoints on black manhood. We will find that writers such as Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and James Baldwin used their fiction—and particular literary and narrative strategies— to challenge the dominant beliefs about the feelings, behaviors, psychology, and sexuality of black men. In appreciation of interdisciplinarity, we will also examine how black masculinity is represented in visual art, music, and film. Texts we will read in this class include Chester Himes’ If He Hollers Let Him Go, selections from Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, and James Baldwin’s Another Country. We will also view Ryan Coogler’s 2013 film, Fruitvale Station.

.13 TR 1600-17015 P. Samuel

Surveillance, Censorship, and Resistance: While the appearance of WikiLeaks in 2006 and Edward Snowden’s 2013 NSA leaks have marked new moments in national discussions around surveillance and censorship, these themes have long been taken up in literature and other forms of media. In this course, we will examine literature, music, art, and film that has been directly impacted or influenced by censorship—including works that take up both surveillance and censorship as central themes and works that have themselves been censored, banned, discredited, or marginalized. How do technologies of surveillance produce both security and vulnerability and serve as both protection and punishment? How does surveillance impact people’s movements, actions, and thoughts? How does surveillance structure space and architecture? How are works identified as dangerous, unlawful, or inappropriate for public consumption? By what mechanisms and for what reasons are specific people or works suppressed, silenced, discredited, or marginalized? We will be engaging a broad range of texts and a wide range of multimedia sources.

 

ENGL 104W: Prose and Fiction: Forms and Techniques

.01 MWF 910-1000 H. Cook

.02 MWF 1110-1200 K. Quigley

Reading Tennessee: Where do we live? At Vanderbilt? In Nashville? Tennessee? What is “Tennessee,” anyway? What does Tennessee mean for us, what has it meant for others, and how are these meanings made? Some tout globalization as the defining fact of our age, while many urge us to renew our commitment to local contexts. In this course, we will contemplate – and engage with – our “local” environs, consider their relationship to “global” issues, and examine the very categories that underlie these concerns.  

In so doing, we will read, discuss, compare, and respond to a selection of Tennessean fiction. This may entail reading writers who seem self-evidently Tennessean, but it may also involve the works of those who write about Tennessee, as well as “local” writers who compel us to reconsider what it means to be “from” Tennessee, or anywhere else for that matter. Our texts will lead us to searching questions about how identities (community, state, regional, national, etc.) are formed, resisted, embraced, and transformed; we will inquire, too, into what it means to attend a “global” university in a geographically specific place. Primary assignments for the course will include readings, conversations, written work, and a local engagement project. En route, we will observe and develop the writing skills and critical faculty necessary to work responsibly with complex materials, communicate questions, claims, and ideas clearly, and make our voices heard.

.03 MWF 1210-1300 J. Krause

.04  MWF 1510-1600 J. Quarry

Monsters in Fiction: In this course, we will explore portrayals of various monsters—both realistic and fantastic—in fictions ranging from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries and analyze the elements of fiction (such as, but not limited to, characterization, point of view, setting, plot, metaphor, and imagery) used to illuminate them and in turn the societal anxieties and desires in the midst of which they appear.  Over our months together, we will attempt to define, and perhaps redefine, what, or who, exactly, a “monster” is and what makes a such a creature simultaneously horrifying and fascinating, and we will proceed to examine novels, graphic novels, and short stories in order to determine the terms by which so-called monsters are understood and described, and what beyond the norm these creatures represent, both literally and metaphorically, in each encounter.

Moreover, however, the aim of this course is to teach you to think critically about literature, and so we also will devote a significant amount of time to focusing on the writing process by way of close readings, discussions, and writing assignments.  Throughout the semester, you will practice analyzing and critiquing our selected literary works in three essays as well as several reading responses and in-class writing assignments, each intended to help you more clearly and more persuasively present your arguments by basing them on textual evidence. 

.05 MWF 1410-1500 J. Bagneris

"On Writing, By Writers: The Craft of Fiction and the Personal Narrative": Storytelling is a crucial component of our daily lives and we’re surrounded (if not inundated) with the imposition of narrative structure and the application of meaning to the day-to-day. From the mundane to the extraordinary, we take part in and witness this process of narration happen within the news/media, movies, television, and the pages of history. This course is designed to give you the tools to articulate and evaluate the various strategies employed by writers to tell a compelling story from both the perspective of the story’s reader and the story’s author. Over the course of the semester we will work to develop and improve your skills as a literary critic and essay-writer and to understand and respond to other writers’ (including your classmates’) work. By the end of the semester you will have the opportunity to devise and carry out original works of short fiction as well as persuasive and analytic essays. The course is primarily skill- and practice-oriented: in other words, we will spend the bulk of our time together learning skills, putting them into practice, evaluating the results, and brainstorming ways to improve. Not only will we examine the strategies of storytelling across genres such as poetry, drama, short stories, and the personal narrative, but we will also consider the tentative distinctions between fact and fiction, fantasy and reality.

.06 MWF 1310-1400 S. Higgs

.07 MWF 910-1000 J. Kraus

 

ENGL 105W: Drama: Forms and Techniques

.01 TR 1435-1550 J. Kraus

.02 TR 935-1050 J. Klass

In this course, we will look at how plays have changed over the last 2,500 years, and how theatrical conventions like the Greek chorus and the Shakespearean soliloquy have given way to other techniques and approaches. We will look at Aristotle’s ideas about the unities and about what constitutes true tragedy: ideas about katharsis and hamartia (or a “fatal flaw,” as it is sometimes translated.) Aristotle argues that plays should either be tragedies or comedies, but not a mixture of the two forms. We’ll look at the plot arcs associated with both kinds of plays – and at plays that break his rules about not mixing forms, about suitable heroes, and about the time frame for plays. We may also get a sense of how influential his ideas from the Poetics remain.

In particular, the theme running through the plays selected for this course might be described as: “the fourth wall down and the family exposed.” Theater, as opposed to film, is a form with obvious spatial limitations, and that can create a claustrophobic atmosphere on-stage – but such an atmosphere is ideal for an exploration of certain families in which characters feel trapped, stuck with the people they live with, doomed by blood ties, and perhaps by economic circumstances – or by a need to connect, to inflict harm, to be affirmed, forgiven or vindicated. Audiences observing any group of characters are voyeurs, in a sense, but film audiences are more like peeping Toms, watching a parade of visual images go by, while theater audiences are more like eavesdroppers, listening as complicated arguments and conversations reveal things about the speakers. Moreover, there is far more room in a play than in a film to let a scene play out, over time, and to peel away the layers of the characters and of their relationships as one might peel an onion; the unlikely mix of love, hate, anger, guilt, resentment, admiration, playfulness, bafflement and certainty involved in some family relationships can be given full scope, as it cannot be on film. So, we will look at how plays about families have changed over time, and make connections between some very different works.

Required Texts/Supplies:

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

The Seagull by Anton Chekhov

Long Day’s Journey Into Night by Eugene O’Neill

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

You Can’t Take It With You by Kaufman and Hart

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

‘Night, Mother by Marsha Norman

How I Learned to Drive by Paula Vogel

True West by Sam Shepard

Cell by Judy Klass

Top Dog/Underdog by Suzan-Lori Parks

Two Sisters and a Piano by Nilo Cruz

Proof by David Auburn

.03 TR 1310-1425 J. Klass

In this course, we will look at how plays have changed over the last 2,500 years, and how theatrical conventions like the Greek chorus and the Shakespearean soliloquy have given way to other techniques and approaches. We will look at Aristotle’s ideas about the unities and about what constitutes true tragedy: ideas about katharsis and hamartia (or a “fatal flaw,” as it is sometimes translated.) Aristotle argues that plays should either be tragedies or comedies, but not a mixture of the two forms. We’ll look at the plot arcs associated with both kinds of plays – and at plays that break his rules about not mixing forms, about suitable heroes, and about the time frame for plays. We may also get a sense of how influential his ideas from the Poetics remain.

In particular, the theme running through the plays selected for this course might be described as: “the fourth wall down and the family exposed.” Theater, as opposed to film, is a form with obvious spatial limitations, and that can create a claustrophobic atmosphere on-stage – but such an atmosphere is ideal for an exploration of certain families in which characters feel trapped, stuck with the people they live with, doomed by blood ties, and perhaps by economic circumstances – or by a need to connect, to inflict harm, to be affirmed, forgiven or vindicated. Audiences observing any group of characters are voyeurs, in a sense, but film audiences are more like peeping Toms, watching a parade of visual images go by, while theater audiences are more like eavesdroppers, listening as complicated arguments and conversations reveal things about the speakers. Moreover, there is far more room in a play than in a film to let a scene play out, over time, and to peel away the layers of the characters and of their relationships as one might peel an onion; the unlikely mix of love, hate, anger, guilt, resentment, admiration, playfulness, bafflement and certainty involved in some family relationships can be given full scope, as it cannot be on film. So, we will look at how plays about families have changed over time, and make connections between some very different works.

Required Texts/Supplies:

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

The Seagull by Anton Chekhov

Long Day’s Journey Into Night by Eugene O’Neill

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

You Can’t Take It With You by Kaufman and Hart

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

‘Night, Mother by Marsha Norman

How I Learned to Drive by Paula Vogel

True West by Sam Shepard

Cell by Judy Klass

Top Dog/Underdog by Suzan-Lori Parks

Two Sisters and a Piano by Nilo Cruz

Proof by David Auburn

 

ENGL 115F: First Year Writing Seminar

.03 TR 1100-1215 H. Shin

Representations of Asian Americans: This course explores the history of Asian American representations in U.S. literature and culture. By tracing a number of disparate Asian American ethnic groups and their varied histories within the United States (immigration and exclusion, settlement and discrimination, assimilation and resistance) the course examines the role Asian Americans played in, and the meaning of their contribution to the construction and development of American national history. Texts will include novels, short stories, graphic narratives, animation, films and critical reflections including Chang-rae Lee’s Native Speaker, Julie Otsuka’s When the Emperor was Divine, Alvin Lu’s Hell Screens, Ted Chiang’s “Tower of Babylon,” Gish Gen’s “Birthmate,” Gene Yang’s American Born Chinese, and the Disney Animation Pocahontas. The course will focus on examining the literary, political, social, and psychological dimensions of Asian American cultural representations, but students will also engage with close textual analysis, foster critical thinking, and hone academic writing skills.

Course Requirements

-          Three essay assignments of varying focus and length

-          Short written assignments on OAK (case by case basis)

-          Attending class screenings for the animation/films

-          Weekly readings (novels will be available at the Bookstore; short stories will be posted to OAK; there will be class screenings for visual media)

Required Texts (available at the bookstore)

-          Chang-rae Lee’s Native Speaker

-          Julie Otsuka’s When the Emperor was Divine

-          Alvin Lu’s Hell Screens

-          Gene Yang’s American Born Chinese

.25 TR 1435-1550 R. Hilles

From Frost to Dove: Storytelling in American Verse.

There is a great tradition of storytelling verse in American poetry that extends from the 19th into the 20th century. In the 20th century Modernism had a profound effect on this tradition, as it did on all art forms, but narrative poetry continued to be vital for some important American poets. Edwin Arlington Robinson, Robert Frost, and Robinson Jeffers in the early 20th century and Robert Penn Warren, Gwendolyn Brooks and Rita Dove in the later 20th century all made use of narrative in their poetry in innovative ways. Plot, character development, setting, and narration, all elements of prose fiction, are elements in the poems of these poets, along with form, rhythm, and imagery. The central events of modern American history are also reflected in their poems, from the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, migrations west and north, and the Civil Rights Movement. Reading their poems we will not only become familiar with some great stories in poetic form, but we will watch the development of modern American society and personal identity. Class meetings will focus on discussion of the reading and discussion of writing critical analysis of narrative poetry. Students will occasionally be responsible for leading discussion of individual poems. They will also have the opportunity to read drafts of one another’s papers in order to assist the process of revision. Grading will be based on three assigned papers (two of which may be revised), class participation, and a final exam. Texts: Edwin Arlington Robinson, Selected Poems; Robert Frost, Early Poems; Robinson Jeffers, Selected Poems; Robert Penn Warren, Brother to Dragons; Gwendolyn Brooks, Blacks; Rita Dove, Thomas and Beulah.

.30 TR 935-1050 I. Nwankwo

What is America to Me?: Immigration and the (Re)Making of American Identity: Over the course of the semester, we will explore personal stories, films, and literature about migration to the U.S. from the Caribbean, Latin America, and Africa, learning about and from these immigrant communities’ cultures, histories, identities, and perspectives on the American Dream. We will consider questions such as: What are the push and pull factors that lead these immigrants to the U.S? What are their experiences when they get here? What impact have they had on American society? How have they been represented and represented themselves in literature, media, and film?

We will begin by learning about the history of immigration in the U.S by delving into literature and films. In particular, through the stories of Irish and other European immigrants who came to the U.S. in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and responses to their arrival we will expand our understanding of the foundations of the United States of America as we know it.

Next, we will move on to talking about immigration from the Caribbean. Novels, autobiographies, and oral history interviews about immigrants’ experiences will figure prominently in this section, alongside films that reveal other nuances of the experiences of these immigrants.

The third major section will focus on African immigrants. Films will help to round out students’ knowledge about the identity challenges faced and posed by these “other African Americans.”

Throughout the semester we will connect the new information we are learning through our readings and films to current-day issues and happenings.

Tailored training in recognized and innovative research methods will be a core element of this course. Students will learn how to formulate research questions; use library resources to help identify and critically engage pertinent primary, secondary, and tertiary sources; cite sources using accepted formats (MLA); conduct and analyze oral history interviews; take research notes; and compile bibliographies on the path to producing a final paper on an aspect our course topic, all with individualized guidance from the professor.

.39 MWF 1010-1100 G. Briggs

Decades before the heralded "American Renaissance" in literature that included Emerson,Thoreau, Melville, and Poe, a coterie of American authors created works that shaped America's literary landscape, challenged conventional wisdom, and helped us to imagine alternative literary histories in the United States. This course will examine how early American authors challenged conceptions of national identity in the burgeoning Republic and engaged historical moments of crisis, such as the Indian Removal and slavery. The novels will cut across several literary genres, including American Gothic and Historical Romance, and feature writers such as Lydia Maria Child and Charles Brockden Brown.

.40 TR 1310-1425 H. Garcia

Environmental Ethics in Beast Fables

What would your dog or cat say if they could speak? This course will examine fables featuring creatures who implore human readers to examine their ethical and spiritual responsibility toward the environment, a fragile ecosystem that cannot endure society's unsustainable practices. This genre will be studied from a global ecocritical perspective and through various media, focusing on the philosophical, scientific, political, and aesthetic implications of the human-animal relationship in ancient Greek, Arabic, and Sanskrit fables and Native American trickster tales (in English translation) as well as in familiar fables such as Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book and the Disney film Bambi.  How this relationship affects the way we treat non-humans and live with each other as animals will also be explored. [3] (P)

This freshmen seminar is designed to give you a firm training in interdisciplinary writing methods, formal and informal, and in effectively using multi-media and blogs to communicate online with a “real” public audience. Toward that end, you are expected to think, write, create, and imagine wildly. Attendance and participation, in and out of class, are not just mandatory but essential to your success.

.97 MWF 1110-1200 J. Morrell

New American Folkore. This course offers an introduction to American folklore and culture heroes from Johnny Appleseed to John Henry, from Anansi the spider to Coyote the trickster. Through readings of tales, legends, myths, ballads, jokes, riddles, proverbs, rituals, festivals, and material folklore, we will explore the way that folklore shapes national, regional, and ethnic identities and the ways that folklore transcends static form of identity and association. We will examine the history of folklore study in the United States and the contemporary theories of ethnography that contribute to further understanding. Students will be introduced to theory, research, and fieldwork.

.98 MWF 1110-1200 J. Wanninger

.99 MWF 1110-1200 G. Briggs

Decades before the heralded "American Renaissance" in literature that included Emerson,Thoreau, Melville, and Poe, a coterie of American authors created works that shaped America's literary landscape, challenged conventional wisdom, and helped us to imagine alternative literary histories in the United States. This course will examine how early American authors challenged conceptions of national identity in the burgeoning Republic and engaged historical moments of crisis, such as the Indian Removal and slavery. The novels will cut across several literary genres, including American Gothic and Historical Romance, and feature writers such as Lydia Maria Child and Charles Brockden Brown.

 

ENGL 116W: Introduction to Poetry

.01 MWF 910-1000 A. Johnson

.02 MWF 1010-1100 D. Ross

This course aims to enrich your love and understanding of poetry by introducing you to a wide range of influential poems. To this end, we will look at contemporary texts focused on issues in American culture, and engage both the content and form of these works. We will consider the poem as a solitary object, as well as a text that is in conversation with its culture. We will concentrate heavily on close-reading, as well as improving your ability to write and think analytically.  

.03 MWF 1110-1200 K. Cosner

.04 MWF 1210-1300 D. Ross

This course aims to enrich your love and understanding of poetry by introducing you to a wide range of influential poems. To this end, we will look at contemporary texts focused on issues in American culture, and engage both the content and form of these works. We will consider the poem as a solitary object, as well as a text that is in conversation with its culture. We will concentrate heavily on close-reading, as well as improving your ability to write and think analytically.  

.05 MWF 1210-1300 A. Johnson

.06MWF 1310-1400 K. Cosner

.07 MWF 1510-1600 K. Cosner

.08 TR 935-1050 J. Bradley

This course will give you a strong foundation in reading, discussing and enjoying poetry. We will look at poems drawn from a wide range of periods and approaches and consider their content and their form as you build the skills and confidence to engage any poem with greater pleasure and understanding, both on its own terms and as a work of art in conversation with the culture and moment from which it emerged and in which it’s being read.
 

Our attention will be focused intensely on the language of the poems we’re reading, but as a “W” course, our attention will also turn to exploring your own language and writing processes, as well. Formal and informal writing will be a major part of our course, and I hope you will remember it as a course that pushed you to embrace writing as a medium for developing and exploring your ideas at the same time that you honed your mastery of writing about poetry as well as the conventions of persuasive academic writing, in general.

.09 TR 1100-1210 E. Barnett

The focus of this class will be to develop a critical vocabulary for talking and writing about poetry through the close study of ten poets and the periodicals in which their work first appeared. Weekly short essays and vigorous participation are expected.

.10 MWF 1410-1500 A. Johnson

.11 TR 810-925 E. Barnett

.12 MWF 1110-1200 D. Birdsong

 

ENGL 117W; Introduction to Literary Criticism

.01 TR 1100-1215 C. Hovanec

Literary Theory and the Modernist Short Story: Why do we study literature? What can it tell us about our culture and ourselves? Does good literature transcend the everyday social, economic, and political business of the world, or does it offer a different way of perceiving that business? In this course, we’ll address these questions and more as we explore the philosophies undergirding English as a discipline today. We’ll explore five prominent schools of literary theory: humanism, historicism and cultural studies, feminism and gender studies, postcolonial theory, and posthumanism. We’ll ask how these theories can help us to read modernist short stories (i.e. stories from the first half of the twentieth century), a genre noted for its self-conscious experimentation with literary conventions. And, as we read and write about these texts, we’ll begin to develop our own theories of what literature does and how to interpret it.

.02 MWF 1210-1300 R. Chapman

 

ENGL 118W: Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis

.01 MWF 810-900 R. Chapman

.02 MWF 910-1000 R.Spivey

Why does the U.S. incarcerate so many of its citizens, more than any other nation in the world? What role does prison play in the national imagination? In this course we will attempt to answer both questions through a study of literature by and about prisoners.  We'll begin the course with a short survey of nineteenth-century American authors (including Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allen Poe and Herman Melville) and examine the frequent motifs of solitude and confinement in their work. To trace changing attitudes toward punishment and incarceration, and to broaden our own understanding of the effects of the modern, prison industrial complex, we'll study Truman Capote's twentieth-century classic, In Cold Blood, as well as several prison memoirs and documentary films.

.03 MWF 1010-1100 R. Chapman

.04 MWF 1010-1100 R. Spivey

Why does the U.S. incarcerate so many of its citizens, more than any other nation in the world? What role does prison play in the national imagination? In this course we will attempt to answer both questions through a study of literature by and about prisoners.  We'll begin the course with a short survey of nineteenth-century American authors (including Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allen Poe and Herman Melville) and examine the frequent motifs of solitude and confinement in their work. To trace changing attitudes toward punishment and incarceration, and to broaden our own understanding of the effects of the modern, prison industrial complex, we'll study Truman Capote's twentieth-century classic, In Cold Blood, as well as several prison memoirs and documentary films.

.05 MWF 1210-1300 H. Freeman

Serialization and the Anti-Hero: How does serialized storytelling affect narrative structure?  On a cultural level, why are we seemingly so obsessed with serial tv, while the Victorian serialized novel is considered passé?  How does genre (novel, comics, TV, etc.) change how we approach serialized stories?  Why is the male “anti-hero” phenomenon so ubiquitous in contemporary TV drama?  In order to begin answering these questions, we’ll be studying a wide variety of texts, including Wilkie Collins’s landmark 1860 novel The Woman in White and the first seasons of Breaking Bad and Orphan Black. 

.06 MWF 1210-1300 R. Spivey

Why does the U.S. incarcerate so many of its citizens, more than any other nation in the world? What role does prison play in the national imagination? In this course we will attempt to answer both questions through a study of literature by and about prisoners.  We'll begin the course with a short survey of nineteenth-century American authors (including Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allen Poe and Herman Melville) and examine the frequent motifs of solitude and confinement in their work. To trace changing attitudes toward punishment and incarceration, and to broaden our own understanding of the effects of the modern, prison industrial complex, we'll study Truman Capote's twentieth-century classic, In Cold Blood, as well as several prison memoirs and documentary films.

.07 MWF 1210-1300 N. Roche

In his poem, The Second Coming, W. B. Yeats states: “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; / Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world.” Written in the aftermath of WWI, Yeats was disillusioned with brutality and its effect upon society. This course is predicated on the idea that literature is influenced by and mirrors the climate of its creation. The Twentieth Century saw the rise of two world wars, protest movements and political revolutions, social upheaval, changes in manners and mores, the dissolution of empires, and the technology necessary for globalization. Furthermore, this time frame produced two major literary eras: Modernism and Postmodernism. In this course we will look at texts that herald and reflect major social change and examine the cultural and historical context of their construction. We will consider various genres and a diverse collection of writers from this period, including: James Joyce, Joan Didion, Flannery O’Connor, Cormac McCarthy, Zora Neale Hurston, T.S. Eliot, Gloria Anzaldua, and Thomas Pynchon.    

.08 TR 1310-1425 C. Hovanec

"Endless Forms": Literature and Science Since Darwin: Literature and science are often perceived as radically different kinds of endeavors with little to say to one another. Yet many poets and novelists have found inspiration in scientific discoveries, and science writing has often aspired to the condition of literature. In this course, we'll trouble the boundary between literary and scientific forms of expression as we read literary fiction, science fiction, and scientific writing from the mid-nineteenth century to today. The reading list is not yet set, but will likely include science writing by Darwin, Julian Huxley, Stephen Jay Gould, Bill Bryson, Frans de Waal, and Neil deGrasse Tyson, along with literary works by H.G. Wells, E.M. Forster, Marianne Moore, Toni Morrison, Margaret Atwood, and Zadie Smith. Some possible areas of focus for the class include the controversy over evolution, the history of scientific racism and sexism, the cultural work of science fiction, debates about environmentalism and the status of animals, and the ways new media and new technologies reconfigure human life.

.09 MWF 1510-1600 H. Freeman

Serialization and the Anti-Hero: How does serialized storytelling affect narrative structure?  On a cultural level, why are we seemingly so obsessed with serial tv, while the Victorian serialized novel is considered passé?  How does genre (novel, comics, TV, etc.) change how we approach serialized stories?  Why is the male “anti-hero” phenomenon so ubiquitous in contemporary TV drama?  In order to begin answering these questions, we’ll be studying a wide variety of texts, including Wilkie Collins’s landmark 1860 novel The Woman in White and the first seasons of Breaking Bad and Orphan Black.

.10 TR 935-1050 V. Kutizinski

.11 TR 1100-1215 H. Spillers

Transatlantic Traffic: Women Singers and the Rise of Popular Culture—from Bessie Smith to Adele: This course is devoted to the study of transatlantic popular culture, especially that of the United States, as it grows from the era of recorded sound to the present. The texts for the course will be drawn from the discographies of female vocalists in the age of mechanical reproduction, from Bessie Smith, one of the earliest performers of modern American music to be captured by recorded sound, to Aretha Franklin at mid-century and the cross-over appeal of Rhythm and Blues, to contemporary vocalists in today’s global, transcultural context, including Beyonce and Adele. Focusing attention on 12 singers, who meld in their performance various traditions of American popular music, i.e., blues, spirituals, gospel, jazz, R&B, soul, funk, and rap, “Transatlantic Traffic” takes up the following questions: 1) What is the relationship between women vocalists and the rise of “popular culture”? 2) How might we describe the moments of transition between eras of female vocalizing? 3) Why is it true, if you agree with the premise, that modern American music defines a key aspect of national identity? 4) What is “soul,” and why do you think it has travelled so successfully across national and cultural borders? We hope that these questions, as they generate others, will yield a rich supply of topics to address in critical writing that fulfills the objectives of the course.

.12 TR 1310-1425 C. Tichi

.13 TR 1310-1425 M. Milazzo

Bodies, Borders, and Power:

Borders are set up to define the places that are safe and unsafe, to distinguish us from them.

                        - Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands / La Frontera

 It is at the borders of pain and suffering that the men are separated from the boys.

                        - Emil Zatopek

This course is concerned with concrete, metaphorical, and discursive borders, and the social realities of exclusion, inequality, and privilege that shape them. What kinds of boundaries separate a “man” from a “boy,” a “citizen” from an “alien,” or a “criminal” from the “innocent”? Why do some borders appear more fluid and permeable than others? Through the critical study of fiction, memoir, and creative nonfiction we will analyze concepts such as race, gender, sexuality, citizenship and criminality as socially, historically, geographically and discursively constructed, and yet as having real and important implications. In the process, we will challenge notions of “normality” and will instead examine normativity as defined by unequal power relations, and in particular by the transnational forces of heteropatriarchy, global capitalism, and racism. Students will be introduced to modes of critical analysis that question how people make meaning through writing and creative expression, and will learn to engage literature from an interdisciplinary perspective, making use of ideas and theories developed in critical race as well as gender and sexuality studies. To enrich our literary analyses, in class we will also critically engage music, video, film, documentary, and news media. Students may have the opportunity to interview a writer whose work we will be reading via Skype.

Required texts:

Nella Larsen, Passing (1929)

Mary Crow Dog, Lakota Woman (1990)

Luis Alberto Urrea, Across the Wire: Life and Hard Times on the Mexican Border (1993) Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body (1993)

Mumia Abu-Jamal, Live From Death Row (1995)

Thando Mgqolozana, A Man Who is Not a Man (2009)

Dual-listed with Women’s and Gender Studies.

.14 TR 1600-1724 C. Hovanec

.15 TR 1600-1725 E. Covington

.16 MWF 1010-1100 H. Freeman

Serialization and the Anti-Hero: How does serialized storytelling affect narrative structure?  On a cultural level, why are we seemingly so obsessed with serial tv, while the Victorian serialized novel is considered passé?  How does genre (novel, comics, TV, etc.) change how we approach serialized stories?  Why is the male “anti-hero” phenomenon so ubiquitous in contemporary TV drama?  In order to begin answering these questions, we’ll be studying a wide variety of texts, including Wilkie Collins’s landmark 1860 novel The Woman in White and the first seasons of Breaking Bad and Orphan Black.  

.17 MWF 1310-1400 G. Briggs

This course will examine the rise of American Literature in the United States from the end of the revolutionary period to the late-nineteenth-century. We will read the work of authors who shaped America’s literary landscape, challenged conventional wisdom, and who help us to imagine alternative literary histories in the US. As much as the course will provide students with a window on cultural responses to prominent issues from our nation’s past, it is also a course in developing the students’ general critical skills. As such, this course is designed to strengthen critical reading and writing skills as we examine literary texts to understand how writers use their work to preserve, disseminate, and analyze the social, cultural, and political issues of their day.

.18 MWF 1410-1500 G. Briggs

This course will examine the rise of American Literature in the United States from the end of the revolutionary period to the late-nineteenth-century. We will read the work of authors who shaped America’s literary landscape, challenged conventional wisdom, and who help us to imagine alternative literary histories in the US. As much as the course will provide students with a window on cultural responses to prominent issues from our nation’s past, it is also a course in developing the students’ general critical skills. As such, this course is designed to strengthen critical reading and writing skills as we examine literary texts to understand how writers use their work to preserve, disseminate, and analyze the social, cultural, and political issues of their day.

.19 MWF 1510-1600 D. Ross

Gods and Monsters: Representations of White Manhood in American Culture: In this course, we will explore late 20th century representations of white manhood in American popular culture and literature. We will endeavor to answer the following questions: Why do representations of white manhood matter? How have representations of white manhood changed over time? How do we consume these representations? What do we assume about white men based on these representations?

In doing so, we will acknowledge and upset our preconceived expectations about white manhood in order to reach a richer analytical understanding about gendered and racialized representations more broadly.  Throughout the semester, students will think and write critically about film, fiction, poetry, and print media in various forms, including reading responses, short analytical pieces, film presentations, and a creative final project.

Possible texts include Of Mice and Men, Fight Club, and Lars and the Real Girl.

.20 TR 810-925 Staff

.21 MWF 1310-1400 N. Roche

In his poem, The Second Coming, W. B. Yeats states: “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; / Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world.” Written in the aftermath of WWI, Yeats was disillusioned with brutality and its effect upon society. This course is predicated on the idea that literature is influenced by and mirrors the climate of its creation. The Twentieth Century saw the rise of two world wars, protest movements and political revolutions, social upheaval, changes in manners and mores, the dissolution of empires, and the technology necessary for globalization. Furthermore, this time frame produced two major literary eras: Modernism and Postmodernism. In this course we will look at texts that herald and reflect major social change and examine the cultural and historical context of their construction. We will consider various genres and a diverse collection of writers from this period, including: James Joyce, Joan Didion, Flannery O’Connor, Cormac McCarthy, Zora Neale Hurston, T.S. Eliot, Gloria Anzaldua, and Thomas Pynchon.    

.22 MWF 110-200 C. Hart

In what ways do the places we inhabit shape our identities? How do we, as individuals, use place as a means of constructing our own identities and of perceiving the identities of others? In this course, we will explore the relationship between place and identity—between setting and character—in literature and culture. Using various texts, including novels, graphic novels, short stories, essays, and poems, we will think about what it means to be from a place, how authors like Emily Brönte, E. M. Forster, Daniel Clowes, David Sedaris, Neil Gaiman, Jeanette Winterson, and Jonathan Safran Foer articulate and explore the effect of place on identity, and how setting influences various elements of a text, especially character.  

.23 MWF 210-300 C. Hart

In what ways do the places we inhabit shape our identities? How do we, as individuals, use place as a means of constructing our own identities and of perceiving the identities of others? In this course, we will explore the relationship between place and identity—between setting and character—in literature and culture. Using various texts, including novels, graphic novels, short stories, essays, and poems, we will think about what it means to be from a place, how authors like Emily Brönte, E. M. Forster, Daniel Clowes, David Sedaris, Neil Gaiman, Jeanette Winterson, and Jonathan Safran Foer articulate and explore the effect of place on identity, and how setting influences various elements of a text, especially character.  

 

ENGL 120W: Intermediate Composition

.01 TR 1600-1715 E. Barnett

This class will be run as a workshop. In addition to reading and commenting on the work of your peers, we will discuss published essays of many sorts (narrative, persuasive, expository) as well as more focused writings on style and grammar. Weekly short essays and vigorous participation are expected.

 

ENGL 122: Beginning Fiction Workshop

.01 TR 935-1050 L. Conell

 

ENGL 123: Beginning Poetry Workshop

.01 TR 1310-1425 C. Dees

.02 TR 1310-1425 A. Charlton

The aim of this course is to enhance your understanding of poetry and to raise your awareness of poetic craft. Our primary text will be Mary Oliver’s A Poetry Handbook; with it, we will explore how poems work in our classroom discussions of published poems and your own poems-in-progress. Your grade will be determined by the timely completion of required assignments, the submission of a final portfolio, attendance and class participation.

 

Spring 2014 200-level English Courses:

ENGL 200: Intermediate Nonfiction Writing

.01 M 1510-1800 TBA

 

ENGL 201 Advanced Fiction Writing

.01 M 1510-1800 P. Guralnick

Limited enrollment. Admission to the workshop is by instructor permission, with re-enrollment by students who have previously taken the course subject to the same proviso. Interested students should register and contact the English Department about submitting a brief writing sample on an assigned topic, to be turned in before the December break.

This is a workshop on Creative Nonfiction, which revolves around the writing of the participants, with additional readings in work by such writers as Gay Talese, Gary Smith, Jack Kerouac, Wil Haygood, Ernest Hemingway, Rosanne Cash, and Alice Munro.

It will focus on issues of characterization, narrative technique, selectivity of detail, and angle of perception, with special emphasis on the profile – in other words, how to make a real-life story come alive in the same way that fictional narrative can.

This is a workshop in which we are all interdependent on each other's efforts.

Three major pieces of 2500-3000 words will be required, along with the possibility of some brief additional exercises. Every student in the course will critique each of the other students' papers in writing, and the class will consist primarily of constructive discussion of the work. Class participation is the second most important element of the class (after the writing itself), so attendance is of the highest importance. Most of all, the workshop is a kind of shared enterprise in which a mutual enthusiasm for writing (irrespective of the level of achievement) should make it engaging – and fun – for all. The only prerequisite is a commitment to effort and honest self-expression.

 

ENGL 204: Intermediate Fiction Workshop

.01 T 1510-1800 Staff

.02 MW 1310-1425 J. Quarry

This intermediate workshop is geared toward those who already have some experience writing short stories, with the intentions of broadening students' knowledge of the elements of craft and strengthening their utilization of narrative techniques, and of encouraging students to pursue experimentation in literary fiction (in this regard, the first half of the course will focus on the writing of speculative fiction).  The chief texts for this class will be approximately thirty stories authored by workshop members, but throughout the semester students also will read and examine craft essays and contemporary American short fiction in order to better understand how to apply what they learn to their own writing. 

 

ENGL 204 Advanced Fiction Workshop

.01 R 310-600 T. Earley

 

ENGL 207 Advanced Poetry Workshop

.01 W 1210-1500 R. Hilles

 

ENGL 208 A: Representative Brittish Writers

.01 TR 1600-1715 A. Hearn

This course will introduce students to the foundations of English literature in its first thousand years of development: from Beowulf to Paradise Lost, we will read representative works covering major (and many minor) writers, movements, genres, and techniques. We will pay particular attention to the relationship of our readings to their specific moments—their political, social, economic, religious, and cultural contexts. This is a thrilling span of English history: from Viking raids, the Norman Conquest, and the Hundred Years War; from Agincourt, the Wars of the Roses, and the defeat of the Spanish Armada; to the Pilgrims at Plymouth, the Civil Wars, the Restoration, and the Great Fire of London. The literature is correspondingly various and exciting, moving from epics through romances, dramas, and sonnet sequences, and back to epics again. Major readings (in whole or in part) will include Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Morte d’Arthur, one of Shakespeare’s history plays, and Paradise Lost. In addition to vigorous class discussion, students should plan on regular quizzes, two exams, two essays, and a group dramatic presentation.

  Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

 

ENGL 208 B: Representative British Writers

.01 MWF 910-1000 R. Gottfried

No writer writes in a vacuum. Moved not only by the surrounding events of the time and place, a writer is changed as well by previous authors and works. This course will examine the major periods of English literature from the Restoration to the Modern era in their cultural features and will study the major poets in engagement with their literary predecessors. The course provides an exposure to the famous works of the English tradition for the general student and provides a broad background for those students considering more specialized advanced studies.

 

ENGL 210 Shakespeare: Representative Selections

.01 MW 1610-1725 L. Marcus

This course is for students who love to read Shakespeare, but are also interested in performance.  We will consider Shakespeare on stage and page through interpretation of the plays in their written form, and through contrasting recent film and video productions of them.  Students will have the opportunity of staging or filming their own scene from Shakespeare as an alternative to one of the papers.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

 

ENGL 211: Representative American Writers

.01 TR 1310-1425 M. Kreyling

 Representative American Writers: I’ve been reading a biography of Apple founder Steve Jobs, and halfway through it dawned on me that Jobs inhabits, simultaneously, two American archetypes found in our literature: the sweet, Zen-like purist Thoreau and the crazy monomaniac of Moby-Dick, Captain Ahab. So, I propose to organize Representative American Writers along the lines of recurrent, archetypal constructions of American-ness, such as: American selfhood; plain style vs. “literary” style; nature vs. the city; democracy and citizenship. This course is designed as a foundation for subsequent courses in American literature, so we will aim for breadth rather than depth. Expect to use an anthology and at least one additional text: F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby. We’ll begin in the era of the Founders and complete the course with Gatsby, the great dying and disappointment of the First World War.

 

ENGL 212: Southern Literature

.01 TR 1600-1725 M. Kreyling

Southern Literature: Nations have regions – parts of the whole, internal voices murmuring dissent and disagreement and alternate histories in a voice with a strange but also familiar accent. Such is the relationship of the US South to the rest of the nation. Those internal voices have produced a literature, and that literature and its relationship to the nation is the subject of this course. The course begins in the 19th century, when the south’s social and economic basis in slavery made it distinct, and will pursue the theme of “distinctness” as far as time will allow into the 20th and the early years of the 21st. Expect to read the major figures (William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, Flannery O’Connor, Richard Wright, and others) as well as samples by writers less well known but no less important to an understanding of the southern-ness of US literature.

 

ENGL 214A: Literature and Intellectual History

. 01 TR 1600-1725 H. Garcia

British Romanticism and India

During the Romantic period (roughly 1780-1830), both British literature and the early British Empire underwent radical transformations in which the Orient, real and imagined, served as an experimental site for envisioning a global modernity. This course is premised on the assumption that literature served as an important medium for the way Britons and their colonial subjects understood the nature of a developing western empire, and the early empire in turn profoundly informed the themes and forms of literary expression in Britain and India. We will focus on connected histories linking South Asia to Britain, as variously articulated across poetry, fiction, travel literature, historical and religious writing, and painting. We will study works by British writers Sir William Jones, Lord Byron, Thomas Moore, and Sydney Owenson in dialogical relationship with Anglophone literary works by contemporary Romantic-era Indians: the Muslim entrepreneur and traveler Sake Dean Mahomet, the first Indian known to write in English, and early Calcutta poets Henry Louis Vivian Derozio, a Eurasian freethinker, teacher, and journalist, and Kasiprasad Ghosh, an orthodox Hindu.

This course is designed to give you a firm training in effectively using multi-media and blogs to communicate online with a “real” public audience. Toward that end, you are expected to think, write, create, and imagine wildly. Attendance and participation, in and out of class, are not just mandatory but essential to your success.

Satisfies ethnic-non-western literature major and minor requirement.

 

ENGL 221: Medieval Literature

.01 TR 935-1050 J. Plummer III

This course introduces the student to the chief literary forms and cultural issues of the late 13th through the 15th centuries in England. We learn Middle English while reading chronicles, saints= lives, drama, romance, lyrics, and allegory, exploring the alterity and modernity of medieval culture, what we have in common with the period and how we differ from it. No previous experience with medieval studies is required or expected. Graded work includes a midterm and final exam, and a paper of 8-10 pages.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

 

ENGL 237W: World Literature, Modern

.01 TR 1435-1550 J. Fesmire

This course familiarizes students with the global context of the Western tradition, as well as with the Western tradition in literature and culture, seventeenth century to the present.  Texts include:  Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus, Molière’s Don Juan, Pope’s The Rape of the Lock and other poems, Byron’s Don Juan, Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac, Woolf’s  A Room of One’s Own, Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita, McEwan’s Atonement, Stoppard’s Arcadia, Roy’s The God of Small Things.”

 

ENGL 243: Literature Science & Technology

.01 MWF 1010-1100 J. Clayton

Literature, Bioethics, and Public Policy: Issues in Evolution and Genetics: The revolution in contemporary genetics has generated enormous media attention on topics such as cloning; newly discovered genes for breast-cancer, homosexuality, and long life; genetic engineering; evolution; gene patenting; DNA evidence in criminal cases; and genetically modified food. In this course we explore how literature explores these intriguing issues, which have important bearing on bioethics and public policy. The course will draw its material from mainstream novels, science fiction, film, advertising, and writing on evolution, genetics, and medicine.

No expertise in genetics or evolutionary theory is required. Students will be introduced to key issues through works by Charles Darwin and James Watson, as well as by videos and essays by some of the major figures of the new genetics. Novels will include Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, Andrea Barrett's Ship Fever, Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go , Simon Mawer's Mendel's Dwarf, Zadi Smith's White Teeth, and H. G. Wells’s The Island of Dr. Moreau.

 

ENGL 249: Seventeenth-Century Literature

.01 TR 1435-1550 E. King

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

 

ENGL 251: Milton

.01 MW 1310-1425 L. Marcus

Description:  John Milton has long been reputed the second greatest writer in English after Shakespeare, but he has almost always been more controversial than Shakespeare. In this course we will find out why.  We will read all of “Classic” Milton: Comus, Lycidas, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes and the minor poems. We will also dip into Milton’s prose, in which he advocated such daring and radical ideas (for his time) as freedom of the press, freedom of religion, and divorce for incompatible partners in marriage. Major emphasis will be placed on considering his writings in the context of the shifting political landscape before and during the English Civil War and its aftermath.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

 

ENGL 252A: Restoration and the Eighteenth Century

 .01 TR 1100-1215 J. Lamb

Literature from the Restoration to 1800 : This is a survey course in which we shall sample some poetry, drama, prose and fiction from the 140 years that elapsed between the restoration of Charles II and the Napoleonic Wars. In order to give it some kind of coherence the texts will be divided into five overlapping categories: commerce, materialism, sexuality, voyages of discovery, and aesthetics. In each there will be at least one central text, with possibilities for development should curiosity carry you further. So:

Commerce: Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees, John Gay The Beggar's Opera

Materialism: Jonathan Swift, Tale of a Tub; John Wilmot, A Ramble in St James's                               Park

Sexuality: The Whore's Rhetoric (Ferrante Pallavicino) and Fantomina (Eliza                                   Haywood)

Voyages:   Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Swift, Gulliver's Travels

Aesthetics:      Andrew Marvell, The Garden; Alexander Pope, Epistle to Burlington,                          Joseph Addison, The Spectator

It is hoped that this arrangement of material will give students a sense of how literary production responded to a rapidly expanding world market as well as to the commoditization of sensuous pleasure. It ought also to give us some sense of how a world not quite yet fully `discovered' helped to alter tastes for landscape in terms of standards that came to be known as the sublime and the picturesque. As well as fulfilling requirements for a writing class, participants will be expected to collaborate (in groups of three) in presentations on a topic of their choice.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

 

ENGL 256: Modern British & American Poetry

.01 TR 1100-1215 M. Jarman

Modern Poetry in English, Yeats to Auden: This course will consider those modern poets, writing in English, primarily between 1900 and 1950, who left the strongest imprint on the poetry of their own time and subsequently:  W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, and Wallace Stevens.  In the first half of the 20th century, each of these poets created a unique style which embodied his or her personal vision of the poet and the modern world.  All but Yeats, who was Irish, were Americans. Yeats, despite living and working many years in London, was strongly attached to his childhood home in County Sligo, and played a critical role in the formation of modern Irish literature and culture. Eliot, born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, and Pound, born in Idaho and raised in Pennsylvania, were expatriates, living in London in Eliot’s case, and in Pound’s case, in London, Paris, and Italy. Eliot became an English citizen and is claimed by both the U.S. and England. Williams lived and worked as a doctor in the place of his birth, Rutherford, New Jersey. Marianne Moore lived most of her life in New York City, working for a time at the New York Public Library. Wallace Stevens was an insurance executive in Hartford, Connecticut. We will consider these poets’ association with place, culture, society, and the history of their times. For all of them, the art of poetry was a foremost concern. Class will consist of an ongoing discussion of their poems and, where relevant, their prose. Two papers, a final, homework assignments throughout the semester. Required texts: William Butler Yeats, Selected Poems and Four Plays; T. S. Eliot, Selected Poems, Four Quartets; Ezra Pound, New and Selected Poems and Translations; William Carlos Williams, Selected Poems; Marianne Moore, Complete Poems; Wallace Stevens, Selected Poems.

 

ENGL 263 African American Literature

.01 TR 1435-1550 H. Spillers

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the study of the literature produced by African-American writers in the social, historical, and political context of the United States; we begin this literary survey with nineteenth-century narratives written by ex-enslaved subjects during the years that immediately precede the U.S. Civil War and go on from there to examine writing and its creative products across the genres of fiction, poetry, and social critique. Starting with the narratives of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, we will investigate writings by W.E.B.DuBois, the practitioners of the Harlem Renaissance, select instances of the generation of black writers poised between WWII and the 1960’s, writers of the Black Arts Movement, between the 1960s and the 1980s, ending with fiction produced by contemporary writers, among them, Toni Morrison and David Bradley. To the extent that time allows, we will also interrogate some of the newer movements in speculative fiction, such as select writings by Samuel Delany and Octavia Butler.

Satisfies ethnic-non-western literature major and minor requirement.

.02 TR 1100-1215 V. Kutzinski

Satisfies ethnic-non-western literature major and minor requirement.

 

ENGL 265: Film and Modernism

.01 MW 1435-1550 S. Girgus

The course focuses on the relationship of film to the forces and movements that define and impel modernism, including changes regarding sexuality and gender, ethics, belief, identity, values, and lifestyles. Readings will include classics of literary modernism and the modern tradition. We will relate these readings to the cinema of modernism from a variety of national film traditions, including Italian, French, British, Russian, Swedish, American, and other cultures. The course will structure this learning and viewing experience in terms of the personal quest in modernity for belief and commitment. We will examine how film originated with the modernist movement and grew to maturity with the great modernists of art, literature, and philosophy.

A Journey in Two Parts: The Crisis and the Quest

I. Film originated with the modernist movement and grew to maturity with the great modernists of art, literature, and philosophy. The course will study the structure, aesthetics, and cultural significance of film from the perspective and within the context of the major themes of modernism: the divided self, the break between language and realism, nihilism and the search for belief, narrative space and time in film, ideology and identity, politics and aesthetics, the body and film. Suggested texts will include classic studies of modernism and the modern tradition as well as recent theories of cinema and modernism. We will read these authors in the modern tradition in conjunction with studying the cinema of modernism as seen in the films of Antonioni, Allen, Bergman,De Sica, Godard, Truffaut, Bunuel, Ford, Eisenstein, Capra, among others.

 

ENGL 269: Special Topics in Film

.01 R 1310-1600 S. Girgus

The course will offer close readings of major films by three of America’s greatest current directors who have profoundly influenced modern film and contemporary culture and values. All three directors have changed our understanding and appreciation of film as art and cultural product. They have directed modern masterpieces as cinematic scenes of cultural engagement, conflict, and transformation. Leaders in developing the creative potential of film art, these directors emphasize certain themes in their work, including changing views of masculinity, the revolution in sexual and gender relationships, violence in contemporary culture, ethnic and racial identities and tensions, the search for meaning and belief, irony and humor.

 

ENGL 273: Problems in Literature: Special Topics

.02 TR 1100-1215 J. Plummer III
 

The Sonnet in English from Wyatt to Wilbur: From The Penguin Book of the Sonnet: “The phenomenon we call the sonnet tradition has resulted in some of the greatest lyric poetry, crossing boundaries of time, style, religion, race, nationality, and ethnic identity. One of the oldest literary forms of the postclassical world, a meeting place of image and voice, passion and reason, elegy and ode, the sonnet has engaged almost every notable poet writing in a Western language. Seeing how each writer meets the challenge of transforming an inherited patter heightens our understanding of the living conversation between past and present. When a sonnet is true to its nature, it encompasses contradiction and arrives at resolution or revelation.”

We will read a wide range of sonnets and sonnet sequences, moving roughly chronologically, with an eye to discovering and discussing ways in which poets have engaged with the form.

 
.03 TR 1435-1550 H. Shin
 
Ghostly Bodies and Dreaming Machines: The Question Concerning Technology and Ontology 
 

“I am a life-form that was born in the sea of information.”

– The Puppet Master, from Ghost in the Shell

As breakthroughs in cybernetics, medical technology and computer science continuously expand the scope of our bodily and mental presence, the question of being presses us with an ever greater urgency. How do we define and know who we are, and how does one certify his or her own existence, in an age when mechanical augmentation, extension, or even replacement of the body is a realistic venture, and the properties of the human mind can be reproduced, preserved, and emulated in the form of digital code? If the human body and its internal mechanism can be compatible with that of machines, and self-evolving machines can interact with or even replace humans in their cognitive capacity, what does being human involve, and mean? This course explores literary and critical works that represent, reflect on and inspire ontological discourses within the context of technological progress. Course materials will include: short stories and novels (full volumes or excerpts) by Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, H. G. Wells, Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, and Neal Stephenson; films and TV productions (mainly excerpts) by Fritz Lang (Metropolis), Charlie Chaplin (Modern Times), Ridley Scott (Blade Runner), and Joss Whedon (Dollhouse); digital literature (Patchwork Girl); graphic narrative (We3); and critical/theoretical reflections or scientific inquiries by René Descartes, Gilbert Ryle, Martin Heidegger, Roger Penrose, Félix Guattari and Jean Baudrillard.

Course Objectives

-            Examine various concepts and properties of being – such as memory, consciousness, physical integrity, sentience, etc. – portrayed in fiction and philosophical/critical texts, and understand how they may contribute to, contradict, or shape our own perception of being in relation to technological apparatuses

-            Discuss how various forms and experiences of being that involve cognitive and bodily extension, alteration, or fusion such as artificial intelligence, cyborgs or genetically engineered entities may confirm or change our understanding of being        

-            Understand the effects of form, medium-specific characteristics, and narrative strategies employed in the text    

-            Develop critical skills to situate and comprehend the texts within the social and historical rubrics from which they were conceived and are currently consumed

 

ENGL 274 Major Figures in Literature

.01 MW 1310-1425 V. Bell

William Faulkner, Modernism, and the American South: Seven major novels by Faulkner considered in the context of his being contradictorily both a southern writer and an experimental modernist and how the abrasion against each other of those two influences produced the uniqueness of his vision. Frequent in-class writing in place of the usual outside-of-class paper(s) plus a final exam.  

.02 MW 1610-1725 T. Goddu

Toni Morrison: This seminar will examine the works and career of Toni Morrison. Beginning with Morrison’s early novels, The Bluest Eye and Sula, the seminar will move chronologically through Morrison’s oeuvre, focusing especially on her trilogy (Beloved, Jazz, Paradise) and one of her most recent novels, A Mercy. We will also read her children’s literature, non-fiction, and literary criticism. We will develop arguments about the particular issues and problems that recur in her works: issues of race, gender, and class, geography and migration, history and memory. We will also use Morrison as a case study of how an author becomes popularized and canonized: how do the professional aspects of a writer’s career affect their writing and its reception? How does winning the Nobel Prize or being chosen for Oprah’s Book Club help to construct Morrison’s stature and her writing? Most importantly, we will locate Morrison’s works at the center of contemporary discussions about race and nation.

Students will be expected to read the primary texts with care as well as to attend to secondary criticism on Toni Morrison. Requirements will consist of several short papers and a final project.  

Please note this is an Honors Seminar and hence requires a 3.4 GPA for admission.

 

ENGL 276: Anglophone African Literature

.01 TR 935-1050 M. Milazzo

Post-Apartheid South African Literature: In this course we will examine post-1994 South African literature in English, with an emphasis on novels by young Black writers that creatively capture the changing realities of everyday life in the aftermath of apartheid. Beginning with an assessment of European colonialism, racial segregation, and resistance, we will examine Black fiction with an eye toward the representation of apartheid’s legacies. In addition, we will analyze the impact that the philosophy of Black Consciousness and the vision of justice developed by anti-apartheid leader Steve Biko continue to exercise upon writers and activists. Through the study of works that take us to affluent suburbs of Johannesburg and Cape Town, rural areas of the Eastern Cape, the bustling township of Soweto, the poverty-stricken inner-city area of Hillbrow, or the lively Wits university campus, students will receive insight into an exciting and rich literary landscape, as well as gain a critical understanding of actual challenges that shape ordinary life in present-day South Africa, especially as they affect the youth. In the process, we will explore the great diversity and vibrancy that characterize South African culture and will ask: What is new (and what is not) about the “New” South Africa and its literature? To enrich our literary analyses, in class we will also critically engage South African music, video, film, documentary, and news media. Students may have the opportunity to interview a writer whose work we will be reading via Skype.

Required texts:

Mark Mathabane, Kaffir Boy: The True Story of a Black Youth’s Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (1986)

Zakes Mda, Ways of Dying (1995)

Niq Mhlongo, Dog Eat Dog (2004)

Kgebetli Moele, Room 207 (2006)

Zoe Wicomb, Playing in the Light (2006) 

Kopano Matlwa, Coconut (2008)

Thando Mgqolozana, A Man Who is Not a Man (2009)

Mongane Wally Serote, Revelations (2010)

Satisfies ethnic-non-western literature major and minor requirement.

 

ENGL 282: The Bible in Literature

.01 MWF 1110-1200 R. Gottfried

An examination of ways in which the Bible and biblical imagery have functioned in literature and fine arts, in both "high culture" and popular culture, from Old English poems to modern poetry, drama, fiction, cartoons, and political rhetoric. Readings include influential biblical texts and a broad selection of literary texts drawn from all genres and periods of English literature.

  Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

 

ENGL 283: Jewish American Literature

.01 MWF 1010-1100 A. Schachter

This course surveys the major questions and themes of twentieth-century Jewish American literature and situates this literature in the context of ethnic writing in America. We will explore such topics such as dialect or voice, multilingualism, ethnic modernism, and racial and ethnic difference. At the beginning of the course will read novelistic accounts of Jewish immigration in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. During the second-half of the semester we will focus on the post-World War II transformation of Jewish writing, looking at writers who have been assimilated into the American literary canon. Some of the questions we will discuss in class are as follows: To what extent should we read these authors as Jewish writers and to what extent are they American? How do Jewish writers in America straddle the divide between Jewish culture and modern American life? How have they defined experience in modern American life? How can we relate Jewish writing to other so-called ethnic literatures? During the course of the semester, we will pay close attention to questions of immigration, gender, race, and ethnic identity.

Satisfies ethnic-non-western literature major and minor requirement.

Eligible for American Studies Major, Eligible for Jewish Studies

 

ENGL 286B: 20th Centry British/World Drama

.01 TR 935-1050 B. Orr

 

ENGL 287: Investigative American Writers

.01 W 1510-1800 A. Little

The Story of Climate Change: Exploring Environmental Crisis and Innovative Breakthrough:

How to report and write stories of environmental change and innovation in America as we grapple with global warming and build a sustainable future.

Taught by award-winning environmental journalist who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, and Outside Magazine, and authored Power Trip: The Story of America’s Love Affair With Energy, this course focuses on one of the most important global challenges of our time. Climate change presents both a crisis and an opportunity: As warming temperatures pose severe ecological challenges, innovators are responding with new discoveries in renewable energy, electric cars, smart homes, and other pivotal technologies. This course will explore what’s going wrong, what’s going right, and the thrill and challenge of documenting historic change. Readings will include selections from essential environmental writings of the last half-century; seminal present-day texts by Thomas Friedman, Bill McKibben, and Elizabeth Kolbert; up-to-the-minute opinion writing and investigative journalism from publications ranging from HuffingtonPost.com and ClimateProgress.com to The Wall Street Journal.

The professor has traveled from deepsea oil rigs into the guts of the electricity grid, from Kansas cornfields into the catacombs of the Pentagon, to investigate America’s changing energy landscape. Students will attempt their own high-adventure investigative journalism in this course—reporting local stories that document the effects of climate change and the emerging green economy. We will discuss your pieces in class and the instructor will critique your writing in private conferences.

Limited enrollment. Admission to the workshop is by instructor permission, with re-enrollment by students who have previously taken the course subject to the same provision. Interested students should register and contact the English Department about submitting a brief writing sample on an assigned topic before the December break.

 

ENGL 288: Special Topics English and American Literature

.01 TR 1310-1425 L. Enterline

Metamorphosis: The course grapples with the question of change and transformation in its broadest manifestations as well as its most specific aspects. Beginning with Lucretius’s On the Nature of Things, which represents matter collecting and dispersing, organizing and disorganizing, and proposes that such changes are the material and carnal equivalent of the changes of figurative language, we will study a wide variety of literary investigations of transformation from the ancient and early modern worlds down to our own time. Metamorphosis questions the boundaries of the human with respect of matter, animals, and the gods.   And under stress, things begin to strike human beings as animate and intelligent; when feelings run high, the psychological dimension of metamorphosis emerges in startling figures of animation and reification, tracing a long rhetorical and poetic history of prosopopoeia – a powerful but tricky trope that puts conventional distinctions (between life and death, figural and literal) at risk and solicits redefinition of such terms.   Texts may include: Lucretius, On the Nature of Things; Ovid, Metamorphoses; Apuleius, The Golden Ass; Petrarch, Rime sparse; Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Winter’s Tale; John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi; Andrew Marvell, selected poems; Pope, The Rape of the Lock; Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels; Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland; J.M. Coetzee, The Lives of Animals.

 Note: Departmental Honors Seminar; 3.4 cum GPA required.

 

ENGL 290B: Honors Thesis

.01 T 1900-2130 M. Wollaeger

 

Spring 2014 dual-listed courses that may be counted toward the major:

 

JS 237 Coming of Age in Jewish Literature and Film

.01 MWF 1310-1400 A. Schachter

Jewish Coming of Age: Through novels, stories, memoirs, and films we will examine the experience of coming of age Jewish from multiple historical and cultural perspectives. What does it mean to grow up in the Russian empire in the late nineteenth century?  In Vilna on the eve of World War II? In 1950s American suburbia? Late twentieth century New Jersey? What are the different challenges that young men and women face as they embrace or reject the Jewish lives their parents lived? What role does sexuality play in the modern Jewish imagination. We’ll address a range of themes in the course ranging from minority identity, the Holocaust, and Zionism to Birthright Israel tours, summer camps, and inter-ethnic and inter-faith relationships. 

Satisfies ethnic-non-western literature major and minor requirement.

 

LATS 201 Introduction to Latino and Latina Studies

.01 TR 1600-1715 L. Lopez

Satisfies ethnic-non-western literature major and minor requirement.

 

WGS 273: Seminar on Psychoanalysis and Feminism

 

TR 1600-1715 L. Enterline

Psychoanalysis, Feminism, Literature: Psychoanalysis and feminism have a long and intellectually provocative history of mutual involvement. Freud’s first psychoanalytic reflections on the psychological effects of normative cultural structures were born from listening to women deemed ill with “hysteria.” Melanie Klein, a highly visible figure in a field largely dominated by male analysts, worked from 1920-1960 in Britain to emphasize the importance of mother-child relations as a response to what she considered a too narrow focus on the figure of the father in Freud’s thought. And in the wake of the influential linguistic turn in French psychoanalytic theory, a series of feminist thinkers took up the project of rethinking gender, sexuality, and culture in a psychoanalytic manner – an engagement that energized the emergent field of feminist literary theory and criticism in the 1970s. Many of these theoretical and critical studies remain important to current work in gender studies. This course will track major developments in the relationship between psychoanalytic thought and feminist inquiry; at the same time, it will place the questions and theories that emerge from that engagement in relation to a number of literary texts that either raise similar questions about gender and sexuality themselves or have been important touchstones in feminist/psychoanalytic scholarship. Texts may include: Freud, Three Essays on a Theory of Sexuality, Mourning and Melancholia, and selections from The Interpretation of Dreams; Jacques Lacan, selections from Ecrits; Judith Butler, Gender Trouble and Bodies that Matter; Gayle Rubin, “Thinking Sex;” Julia Kristeva, selected essays; Jacqueline Rose, selected essays; Shakespeare, Hamlet; John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi; Henry James, The Turn of the Screw; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse.

 

 

ASIA 200W Coming of Age in Asia

TR 935-1015 Ben Tran

In the European Bildungsroman (or coming-of-age novel), young protagonists come of age, learning the ways of the world psychologically, socially, and morally.  Youth in this genre represents a struggle between self-determination and the processes of socialization.  It symbolizes modern society’s demands and uncertainties, as well as modernity’s potential for mobility and instability.  This course will examine how the Bildungsroman takes on different meanings in Asian literatures.  We will read coming-of-age works that address and represent the politics of gender, nationalism, and language within the frameworks of modernity andcolonialism.  The class will look at the experiences of young men and women in different socio-historical contexts that range from Indonesia to Burma.  We will also turn our attention to individuals who—traveling to urban centers, foreign countries, and ancestral lands—must grapple with geographical displacement.

Literary texts will include:

Dumb Luck, Vu Trong Phung

The Lover, Marguerite Duras

This Earth of Mankind, Pramoedya Ananta Toer

Sightseeing, Rattawut Lapcharoensap

Not Out of Hate, Ma Ma Lay

*Besides these primary texts, reading assignments will also compromise of secondary reading material or writings about the genre of the novel, particularly the Bildungsroman.  These materials will be posted on OAK.

 Satisfies ethnic-non-western literature major and minor requirement

 

MHS 216 L. Andrews

Exploration of Afrofuturism as a literary genre and its critique of the impact of techno-science and medicine on black health, life, and futurity. Multidisciplinary approach in understanding novels, memoirs and secondary texts. No credit for students who took MHS 290 section 3 in fall 2013. [HCA]